California recall candidate Larry Elder says it could be argued that slave owners were owed reparations after the Civil War

In this July 12, 2021 file photo, radio talk show host Larry Elder poses for a photo in his studio in Burbank, Calif.
In this July 12, 2021 file photo, radio talk show host Larry Elder poses for a photo in his studio in Burbank, Calif.
  • On a July episode of Prager University's "The Candace Owens Show," Owens said the US was one of the first countries to abolish the slave trade.
  • Her guest, Larry Elder, said because slavery was legal and their "property" had been taken, slave owners could be owed reparations.
  • Elder said the compensation UK slaveowners received for their loss of property prevented civil war.
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On a July 18 episode of Prager University's "The Candace Owens Show," Larry Elder said an argument could be made that slave owners were owed reparations after the Civil War because slavery was legal and their "property" had been taken.

"When people talk about reparations, do they really want to have that conversation? Like it or not, slavery was legal," Elder said. "Their legal property was taken away from them after the Civil War, so you could make an argument that the people that are owed reparations are not only just Black people but also the people whose 'property' was taken away after the end of the Civil War."

Owens and Elder's conversation on reparations began when Owens said the US was one of the first countries to ban the slave trade.

It was one of the last countries to abolish slavery, according to PolitiFact.

Elder replied that the United Kingdom compensated slave owners for their loss of property, stating that the "substantial amounts of money" they received from the government prevented civil war from breaking out like it did in the US.

The British Slave Compensation Commission distributed £20 million in compensation to slave owners following the passage of the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833, according to the Centre for the Study of the Legacies of British Slavery.

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