Archive for Taiyler Simone Mitchell

Rep. Katie Porter calls out Johnson & Johnson over trying to split company during baby powder lawsuits

Johnson & Johnson logo
  • Rep. Katie Porter blasted Johnson & Johnson for trying to separate its company.
  • She said that the company is trying to "shield its assets" during lawsuits.
  • The lawsuits allege that the company knew their baby powder had asbestos in it for decades.

Rep. Katie Porter called out Johnson & Johnson on Twitter for moving to separate the Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder portions from the company as it faces lawsuits from tens of thousands of women alleging the Baby Powder and other talc products from the company were contaminated with asbestos.

"Johnson & Johnson filed in court last week to split its Baby Powder from the rest of the company," the congresswoman tweeted. "Why? J&J knew asbestos laced some bottles but kept it a secret for decades. Tens of thousands of women with ovarian cancer are suing, and the company wants to shield its assets."

"J&J sold the powder for 60 years, and now that it has to pay for these women's medical bills, it wants the courts to treat 'Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder' as a separate company," California congresswoman continued.

A 2018 investigation by Reuters reported that small amounts of asbestos were found in the company's baby powder between the early 1970s and the early 2000s. The investigation found through documents that the company failed to disclose that information.

The company has repeatedly denied the claims.

Reuters reported last week that cases against Johnson & Johnson cost to company about $1 billion to defend, and settlements and verdicts have been an additional $3.5 billion.

In June, J&J had to pay out $2 billion to women who claim their products caused ovarian cancer.

Nearly 40,000 plaintiffs are suing Johnson & Johnson, alleging that their talc-based products caused cancer and mesothelioma.

In one suit, the plaintiffs allege "Johnson & Johnson's baby powder was aggressively marketed to Black women as a product that would 'maintain freshness and cleanliness,'" Insider's Aleeya Mayo previously reported. "But, the group says, internal documents from a study conducted in 1968 suggest that the powder contained talc which may have been contaminated with asbestos and that the company knew there was a 'carcinogenic nature of talc and the effects of talc use.'"

The company put these claims into a company called LTL Management LLC, which filed for bankruptcy last Thursday, October 14, halting the cases, according to Reuters. The lawsuits are currently paused while the bankruptcy is negotiated. J&J said will fund the company's legal costs, but the amount is under review, Reuters reported.

Court paperwork by the newly filed company said that the case was "necessitated by an unrelenting assault by the plaintiff trial bar, premised on the false allegations that the ... talc products contain asbestos and cause cancer," according to Reuters.

"There are countless Americans suffering from cancer, or mourning the death of a loved one, because of the toxic baby powder that Johnson & Johnson put on the market that has made it one of the most profitable pharmaceutical corporations in the world. Their conduct and now bankruptcy gimmick is as despicable as it is brazen," Linda Lipsen, who is a part of the American Association for Justice, said in a statement, according to ABC News.

The company did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

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Trump brought up an unsubstantiated claim in the Steele dossier to the National Republican Senatorial Committee: ‘I’m not into golden showers’

Donald Trump
Former President Donald Trump speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Dallas, Texas, on July 11, 2021.
  • A former British spy included the unverified claim in a collection of memos now known as the Steele dossier.
  • Trump has repeatedly denied claims of the existence of the tape, and the dossier's claim is unsubstantiated.
  • "I'm not into golden showers," said the former president on Thursday.

Former President Trump denied claims that he'd ever had any interaction with Russian sex workers during Thursday remarks to a group of Republicans in Palm Beach, Florida, according to Josh Dawsey and Michael Scherer of The Washington Post.

"I'm not into golden showers," he said, according to The Post. "You know the great thing, our great first lady - 'That one,' she said, 'I don't believe that one.'"

The "golden showers" comment refers to unverified claims made in what is now known as the Steele dossier - a collection of memos put together by former British spy Christopher Steele during the 2016 presidential election looking into Trump's ties to Russia.

While some of the dossier's claims have been substantiated, as Insider's Sonam Sheth breaks down in a very helpful piece, salacious claims of a pee-tape have not been verified.

"The dossier said Trump rented the presidential suite at the Ritz-Carlton in Moscow during a trip to Russia in 2013. While staying at the hotel, the document says, Trump hired Russian prostitutes to perform sexual acts in front of him which involved urination," Sheth previously explained. "The hotel is said to be monitored by Russian intelligence, and the dossier alleged that Russian authorities obtained footage of the events which they then used as leverage over Trump."

There is no evidence that this tape exists. Trump has denied the claims and called the dossier "a pile of garbage."

The dossier was referenced by both the FBI and the Senate Intelligence Committee when they were investigating Russia's interference in the 2016 election and whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia. (Special counsel Robert Muller found that Russia did interfere in the 2016 election but did not have sufficient evidence that the Trump campaign coordinated with Russia. Mueller's findings did not exonerate Trump on obstruction of justice, but left that question to Congress citing a DOJ policy.)

On Thursday, according to The Post, the former president brought up the claim during the National Republican Senatorial Committee donor retreat - without having been asked about the topic. The group included senators and GOP strategists.

The Office of Donald Trump and the NRSC did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

In addition to bringing up the "golden showers," Trump repeatedly made baseless claims about 2020 election fraud.

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Kamala Harris says that the caregiving economy is overlooked because women rely on it most

Kamala Harris
Vice President Kamala Harris speaks during a meeting on voting rights at the TCF Center in Detroit, Monday, July 12, 2021.
  • The vice president spoke at a virtual town hall on Thursday advocating the Build Back Better plan.
  • VP Kamala Harris said that family leave is often pushed aside because it primarily impacts women.
  • It's not prioritized because "because most people who rely on care are women, and most people who supply care are also women."

Vice President Kamala Harris argued in favor of the Biden administration's Build Back Better agenda, saying that the caregiving economy is pushed aside because it primarily impacts women, during a virtual town hall on Thursday.

According to Harris, paid time off and, specifically, paid family leave isn't prioritized "because most people who rely on care are women, and most people who supply care are also women. So it is time to make care a top priority."

"For working people and for working women in particular, care is a prerequisite to be able to get to work," she added.

She said that the average family has to spend 13% of their income on childcare, which can often cost more than housing, healthcare, or in-state college tuition in some states.

The $3.5 trillion Build Back Better plan aims to improve conditions for working families. The legislation would cut the cost of childcare in half, extend the child tax credit, increase paid leave, and expand care for senior citizens and people with disabilities.

Critics of the agenda like Sen. Joe Manchin said that the reconciliation bill will give Americans an "entitlement mentality."

"I cannot accept our economy, or basically our society, moving towards an entitlement mentality," said the Senator. "I can help those who really need help if those who help themselves do so."

Democrats are currently negotiating on Biden's $3.5 trillion 10-year agenda, as some senators like Manchin want to see the price tag lowered. This could mean cuts to improvement in healthcare, childcare, climate change solutions, and education.

During the town hall, the vice president seemed to counter that claim: "This is about allowing people the dignity with which they deserve and want to live."

The White House and the Office of Senator Joe Manchin did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

Watch the full clip here:

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Trump urged GOP senators to vote ‘no’ on raising the debt ceiling. 11 senators, including Mitch McConnell, ignored him and voted to pave the way for passage.

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) gives a thumbs up when asked whether a deal has been reached regarding the ongoing debate on the national debt reduction on July 31, 2011 in Washington, DC.
U.S. Senate Minority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) gives a thumbs up when asked whether a deal has been reached regarding the ongoing debate on the national debt reduction on July 31, 2011 in Washington, DC.
  • Former President Donald Trump has been vocal about disagreeing with raising the debt ceiling.
  • But 11 GOP senators helped Democrats clear a procedural vote that paved the way for final passage.
  • Trump's sway is more limited in the Senate compared to the House.

Former President Donald Trump urged Senate Republicans to oppose raising the debt ceiling only minutes before the vote began. But 11 GOP senators - including the upper chamber's top Republican - ignored his comments anyway and helped Democrats clear a procedural hurdle in the deadlocked Senate allowing the bill to pass in the end.

"Republican Senators, do not vote for this terrible deal being pushed by folding Mitch McConnell. Stand strong for our Country. The American people are with you!" the former president advised.

Eleven GOP senators helped Democrats clear an initial procedural vote to cut off debate and break the 60-vote threshold needed to overcome a filibuster. That allowed the measure to advance to final passage with only Democratic votes.

Sens. John Barrasso of Wyoming, Roy Blunt of Missouri, Shelley Moore-Capito of West Virginia, Susan Collins of Maine, John Cornyn of Texas, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Rob Portman of Ohio, Mike Rounds of South Dakota, Richard Shelby of Alabama, and John Thune of South Dakota helped Democrats break the filibuster. The cloture vote was 61-38; the final vote on the bill was 50-48 along party lines.

Trump's influence is more limited in the Senate compared to the House, where he holds outsized sway among Republican lawmakers. In the summer, 19 Republican senators supported President Joe Biden's $550 billion infrastructure bill, despite his demands that they tank it. Still, that doesn't mean he wields no influence in the Senate.

"I think Donald Trump always influences people's votes whether he says something or doesn't," Sen. Kevin Cramer of North Dakota told reporters.

Senate Republicans were largely upset with McConnell's maneuver on Thursday, and they struggled to dig up 10 votes in their ranks to clear the first procedural vote, known as cloture. Raising the debt ceiling would avoid a government default. An agreement made Thursday allows for a $480 billion increase until December 3.

The debt ceiling is the statutory cap on how much the government can borrow to repay its bills. Suspending the limit gives the US more time to pay its bills for pandemic stimulus and other key aid programs from the last two years. If Congress fails to raise the limit, the government can default on its debt and plunge the US into a new economic crisis.

"We've averted the fiscal cliff - at least for now," Murkowski told reporters after the vote.

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Former Trump press secretary Stephanie Grisham believes Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump ‘thought they were a shadow president and first lady’

U.S. President Donald Trump (R), stands with his wife first lady Melania Trump, daughter Ivanka Trump and her husband Jared Kushner, inside of the inaugural parade reviewing stand in front of the White House on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald Trump was sworn in as the nation's 45th president today.
U.S. President Donald Trump (R), stands with his wife first lady Melania Trump, daughter Ivanka Trump and her husband Jared Kushner, inside of the inaugural parade reviewing stand in front of the White House on January 20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Donald Trump was sworn in as the nation's 45th president today.
  • Former Trump press secretary Stephanie Grisham appeared on CNN to discuss her new book.
  • She said that working with Jared Kushner was "tough" because he was never "challenged."
  • She said Kushner and Ivanka Trump acted as though they were "a shadow president and first lady."
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Former press secretary to Donald Trump, Stephanie Grisham, said in a new interview on CNN's "New Day" that Jared Kushner was able to navigate the White House freely without being checked or "challenged" because he was Trump's son-in-law.

"I believe that he and Ivanka kind of thought they were a shadow president and first lady," she said.

Grisham appeared on the show Tuesday where she discussed her book, "I'll Take Your Questions Now," and what it was like working with Kushner, who she refers to as "Rasputin in a slim suit" in her book.

She said Kushner inserted himself into affairs that didn't concern him and "would dive into these areas where I know he had absolutely no expertise and, you know, claim to save the day, and then he would leave."

She said that he "got really heady with power," would disappear with Ivanka Trump on vacation when conflicts arose, and probably did not leave the White House "the best version of himself."

She also said she believed that both Kushner and his wife Ivanka Trump were intelligent, but that Ivanka was likely "the brains" behind the shadow president.

Grisham was the Press Secretary for Former President Trump for a total of nine months before returning to work for Melania Trump.

Trump responded to the book by referencing Grisham's break-up with a former White House, who she claimed was abusive, CNN reported.

"Stephanie didn't have what it takes and that was obvious from the beginning. She became very angry and bitter after her break up and as time went on she was seldom relied upon, or even thought about," he said.

"Now, like everyone else, she gets paid by a radical left-leaning publisher to say bad and untrue things," the former president added.

The Office of Donald J. Trump did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

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Trump Super PAC rebrands: ‘Make America Great Again, Again!’

US President Donald Trump greets the crowd during a campaign rally at the Florida State Fairgrounds Expo Hall in Tampa, Florida, on July 31, 2018.
US President Donald Trump greets the crowd during a campaign rally at the Florida State Fairgrounds Expo Hall in Tampa, Florida, on July 31, 2018.

The "ONLY Trump approved Super PAC" has rebranded from "Make America Great Again Action" to "Make America Great Again, Again!" the political action committee announced Monday.

"MAGA, Again! will support Trump-endorsed candidates across the country who have proven to be fighters of the MAGA movement and President Trump's many accomplishments," a Monday press release said.

According to Newsweek, Former President Trump has endorsed 37 candidates for House, Senate, and governor, and other elected positions for the 2022 elections. However, Trump has not announced 2024 plans to run for president yet.

"We look forward to building on the success of MAGA Action with our new committee, Make America Great Again, Again!" Pam Bondi, chairman of the political group and former Florida Attorney General, said in the statement. "We are thrilled to continue to support America First candidates in the midterms and beyond."

Bondi acquired the role of chairman after Corey Lewandowski moved on "to other endeavors," following the revelation of a sexual misconduct allegation from a Trump donor last Wednesday, according to a tweet by Trump's Communication Director Taylor Budowich.

"Trump folks had no way to legally replace Lewandowski, one of two board members of the first super PAC, unless he stepped down, so they're now forming a new group," New York Times White House correspondent Maggie Haberman said on Twitter by way of explaining the name change.

The Office of Donald J. Trump did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slams Facebook during outage, saying company’s ‘monopolistic behavior’ saying it’s destructive to ‘free society and democracy’

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez(D-NY) listens as Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Financial Services Committee on "An Examination of Facebook and Its Impact on the Financial Services and Housing Sectors" in the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, DC on October 23, 2019.
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez(D-NY) listens as Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Financial Services Committee on "An Examination of Facebook and Its Impact on the Financial Services and Housing Sectors" in the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, DC on October 23, 2019.
  • A Monday outage took Facebook-owned companies offline- including WhatsApp and Instagram.
  • Rep. Ocasio-Cortez slammed the company saying it is a threat to "free society and democracy."
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez blamed what she called Facebook's "monopolistic behavior" for the impacts of Monday's Facebook outage that affected WhatsApp, Instagram, Facebook, and Messenger.

She specifically responded to a claim that Latin American communities were disproportionately affected by the Facebook outage on Monday, due to the high use of WhatsApp.

"It's almost as if Facebook's monopolistic mission to either own, copy, or destroy any competing platform has incredibly destructive effects on free society and democracy," the congresswoman said on Twitter, in response to Forbes editor José Caparroso.

"Remember: WhatsApp wasn't created by Facebook. It was an independent success. FB got scared & bought it," Ocasio-Cortez continued.

During the outage, Caparroso tweeted: "Latin America lives on WhatsApp. I am surprised by so many people underestimating how catastrophic this downfall has been."

Other social media users agreed. "The repercussions of WhatsApp being down in The Rest Of The World are vast and devastating. It's like the equivalent of your phone and the phones of all of your loved ones being turned off without warning. The app essentially functions as an unregulated utility," said Aura Bogado, a reporter and producer at Reveal.

"If Facebook's monopolistic behavior was checked back when it should've been (perhaps around the time it started acquiring competitors like Instagram), the continents of people who depend on WhatsApp & IG for either communication or commerce would be fine right now," Ocasio-Cortez added. "Break them up."

Rep. Ocasio-Cortez has been a staunch supporter of breaking up big tech and supported Sen. Elizabeth Warren's plan during her 2020 presidential campaign, according to Politico.

"Facebook as a basic communications platform while also selling ads and also being a surveillance platform," Ocasio-Cortez said to Politico in 2019. "Those functions should be broken up, but how that gets levied and how that gets approached is what we need to take a fine-tooth comb at."

The Facebook outage lasted 6 hours and was restored before 6 p.m. ET.

"*Sincere* apologies to everyone impacted by outages of Facebook-powered services right now. We are experiencing networking issues and teams are working as fast as possible to debug and restore as fast as possible," said Mike Schroepfer, the chief technology officer for Facebook, via Twitter this afternoon.

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Shocking photos show Haitian migrants swimming across the Rio Grand into Mexico and being confronted by Border Patrol agents on horses

CIUDAD ACUNA, MEXICO - SEPTEMBER 20: Haitian immigrants cross the Rio Grande back into Mexico from Del Rio, Texas on September 20, 2021 to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico. As U.S. immigration authorities began deporting immigrants back to Haiti from Del Rio, thousands more waited in a camp under an international bridge in Del Rio while others crossed the river back into Mexico to avoid deportation.
CIUDAD ACUNA, MEXICO - SEPTEMBER 20: Haitian immigrants cross the Rio Grande back into Mexico from Del Rio, Texas on September 20, 2021 to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico. As U.S. immigration authorities began deporting immigrants back to Haiti from Del Rio, thousands more waited in a camp under an international bridge in Del Rio while others crossed the river back into Mexico to avoid deportation.
  • Some 14,000 mostly-Haitian migrants settled under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas, on Friday.
  • The Biden administration is using Title 42 to deport the migrants and prevent the spread of COVID-19.
  • Photos show the migrants' journey as they seek asylum.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Photos captured between Friday, September 17, and Monday, September 20 show Haitian migrants trying to navigate the humanitarian crisis at the US and Mexico border.

Some of the estimated 14,000 mainly Haitian migrants that ended up in Del Rio, Texas, seeking asylum following a massive earthquake and the assassination of the Haitian president, began heading back to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, on Monday, to avoid being deported by the US.

Thousands of migrants had settled underneath a bridge in Del Rio, Texas, in the heat where essentials such as food, water, and restrooms were scarce.

President Joe Biden, who had discontinued some of Trump's immigration policies, leading migrants to believe the US was more open to migrants, has begun deporting migrants back to Haiti, The New York Times reported.

The mayor of Del Rio, Texas declared a state of emergency on September 17 following the settlement of thousands of mostly Haitian migrants underneath a bridge in Del Rio.
Haitian migrants use a dam to cross to and from the United States from Mexico, Friday, Sept. 17, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas.
Haitian migrants use a dam to cross to and from the United States from Mexico, Friday, Sept. 17, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas.

Del Rio Mayor Bruno "Ralphy" Lozano is working alongside Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas and the Chief of the US Border Patrol Raul Ortiz to find a solution at the border and to deport migrants, the mayor said in a tweet on Sunday.

Some Haitian migrants were spotted moving back towards Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, on September 20, to prevent being deported back to Haiti.
Migrants, many from Haiti, wade across the Rio Grande river from Del Rio, Texas, to return to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021, to avoid deportation from the U.S. The U.S. is flying Haitians camped in a Texas border town back to their homeland and blocking others from crossing the border from Mexico.
Migrants, many from Haiti, wade across the Rio Grande river from Del Rio, Texas, to return to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021. The US is flying Haitians camped in a Texas border town back to their homeland and blocking others from crossing the border from Mexico.

Desperate to not return back to Haiti, some migrants have begun moving from Texas back into Mexico. CNBC reported that at least 100 migrants were heading back to Mexico.

As of Sunday, September 19, the US had flown 3,300 Haitians back to Haiti. 

Haitian migrants were captured on photo wading through the Rio Grande.
CIUDAD ACUNA, MEXICO - SEPTEMBER 20: Haitian immigrants cross the Rio Grande back into Mexico from Del Rio, Texas on September 20, 2021 to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico. As U.S. immigration authorities began deporting immigrants back to Haiti from Del Rio, thousands more waited in a camp under an international bridge in Del Rio while others crossed the river back into Mexico to avoid deportation.
Haitian immigrants cross the Rio Grande back into Mexico from Del Rio, Texas on September 20, 2021 to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico. As US immigration authorities began deporting immigrants back to Haiti from Del Rio, thousands more waited in a camp under an international bridge in Del Rio while others crossed the river back into Mexico to avoid deportation.
Some migrants also crossed the Rio Grande in search of food and other resources.
Haitian migrants cross the Rio Grande to get food and supplies near the Del Rio-Acun?a Port of Entry in Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila state, Mexico on September 18, 2021. - The mayor of Del Rio, Texas declared a state of emergency on September 17, 2021 after more than 10,000 undocumented migrants, many of them Haitians, poured into the border city in a fresh test of President Joe Biden's immigration policy. Del Rio Mayor Bruno Lozano said that the migrants were crowded in an area controlled by the US Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) beneath the Del Rio International Bridge, which carries traffic across the Rio Grande river into Mexico.
Haitian migrants cross the Rio Grande to get food and supplies near the Del Rio-Acuna Port of Entry in Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila state, Mexico on September 18, 2021.
US Customs and Border Patrol agents were photographed using whips to prevent Haitian migrants from joining the other Haitian migrants in Del Rio, Texas.
United States Border Patrol agents on horseback try to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on September 19, 2021. - US law enforcement are attempting to close off crossing points along the Rio Grande river where migrants cross to get food and water, which is scarce in the encampment. The United States said Saturday it would ramp up deportation flights for thousands of migrants who flooded into the Texas border city of Del Rio, as authorities scramble to alleviate a burgeoning crisis for President Joe Biden's administration.
United States Border Patrol agents on horseback try to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on September 19, 2021.

Those who tried to return with resources on Sunday were met by US Customs and Border Patrol agents on horseback who were armed with whips.

"I have seen some of the footage," Jen Psaki, White House press secretary, said to reporters during a news briefing on Monday, referring to video of the CBP agents scattering migrants. "I don't have the full context. I can't imagine what context would make that appropriate, but I don't have additional details. … I don't think anyone seeing that footage would think it was acceptable or appropriate."

According to The Washington Post, the Border Patrol agents eventually let the migrants in through the border. 

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said in a tweet on Monday that the current "immigration system is designed for cruelty towards and dehumanization of immigrants." 

"This is a stain on our country," she continued.

"Video and photos coming out of Del Rio showing US Border Patrol's mistreatment of Haitian migrants along the border are horrific and disturbing," Chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rep. Bennie G. Thompson, told The Post.

"This mistreatment runs counter to our American values and cannot be tolerated," he added.

The Department of Homeland Security responded to the footage on Monday.
United States Border Patrol agents on horseback tries to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on September 19, 2021. - The United States said Saturday it would ramp up deportation flights for thousands of migrants who flooded into the Texas border city of Del Rio, as authorities scramble to alleviate a burgeoning crisis for President Joe Biden's administration.
United States Border Patrol agents on horseback tries to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on September 19, 2021.

The Department of Homeland Security said that CBP is currently investigating the crisis, according to PBS anchor Yamiche Alcindor.

"Secretary Mayorkas visited Del Rio today and witnessed the extraordinary work of DHS personnel," DHS spokesperson said in the statement. "The footage is extremely troubling and the facts learned from the full investigation, which will be conducted swiftly, will define the appropriate disciplinary actions to be taken."

"We are committed to processing migrants in a safe, orderly, and humane way. We can and must do this in a way that ensures the safety and dignity of migrants," the statement concluded.

DHS and CBP did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment. 

The Biden-Harris Administration will continue invoking Title 42 - an order issued by Trump.
Migrants, many from Haiti, board a bus after they were processed and released after spending time at a makeshift camp near the International Bridge, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. The U.S. is flying Haitians camped at Texas border town back to their homeland and trying to block others from crossing the border from Mexico.
Migrants, many from Haiti, board a bus after they were processed and released after spending time at a makeshift camp near the International Bridge, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. The US is flying Haitians camped at Texas border town back to their homeland and trying to block others from crossing the border from Mexico.

The Biden-Harris administration has challenged courts for the ability to invoke Title 42 and despite activists' cries to end it.

"If you come to the US illegally, you will be returned," said Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas at a Monday news conference. "Your journey will not succeed."

Title 42 is an immigration policy issued by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention during Trump's presidency that allows the swift deportation of migrants as a measure to keep COVID-19 from spreading.

Steven Forester, an immigration policy coordinator at the US-based Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti, told Al Jazeera that the order is entirely "unconscionable."

"There's no way Haiti can handle the people that are in Haiti now given the conditions there. It can't provide for these people," he added.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Shocking photos show Haitian migrants swimming across the Rio Grand into Mexico and being confronted by Border Patrol agents on horses

CIUDAD ACUNA, MEXICO - SEPTEMBER 20: Haitian immigrants cross the Rio Grande back into Mexico from Del Rio, Texas on September 20, 2021 to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico. As U.S. immigration authorities began deporting immigrants back to Haiti from Del Rio, thousands more waited in a camp under an international bridge in Del Rio while others crossed the river back into Mexico to avoid deportation.
CIUDAD ACUNA, MEXICO - SEPTEMBER 20: Haitian immigrants cross the Rio Grande back into Mexico from Del Rio, Texas on September 20, 2021 to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico. As U.S. immigration authorities began deporting immigrants back to Haiti from Del Rio, thousands more waited in a camp under an international bridge in Del Rio while others crossed the river back into Mexico to avoid deportation.
  • Some 14,000 mostly-Haitian migrants settled under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas, on Friday.
  • The Biden administration is using Title 42 to deport the migrants and prevent the spread of COVID-19.
  • Photos show the migrants' journey as they seek asylum.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Photos captured between Friday, September 17, and Monday, September 20 show Haitian migrants trying to navigate the humanitarian crisis at the US and Mexico border.

Some of the estimated 14,000 mainly Haitian migrants that ended up in Del Rio, Texas, seeking asylum following a massive earthquake and the assassination of the Haitian president, began heading back to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, on Monday, to avoid being deported by the US.

Thousands of migrants had settled underneath a bridge in Del Rio, Texas, in the heat where essentials such as food, water, and restrooms were scarce.

President Joe Biden, who had discontinued some of Trump's immigration policies, leading migrants to believe the US was more open to migrants, has begun deporting migrants back to Haiti, The New York Times reported.

The mayor of Del Rio, Texas declared a state of emergency on September 17 following the settlement of thousands of mostly Haitian migrants underneath a bridge in Del Rio.
Haitian migrants use a dam to cross to and from the United States from Mexico, Friday, Sept. 17, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas.
Haitian migrants use a dam to cross to and from the United States from Mexico, Friday, Sept. 17, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas.

Del Rio Mayor Bruno "Ralphy" Lozano is working alongside Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas and the Chief of the US Border Patrol Raul Ortiz to find a solution at the border and to deport migrants, the mayor said in a tweet on Sunday.

Some Haitian migrants were spotted moving back towards Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, on September 20, to prevent being deported back to Haiti.
Migrants, many from Haiti, wade across the Rio Grande river from Del Rio, Texas, to return to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021, to avoid deportation from the U.S. The U.S. is flying Haitians camped in a Texas border town back to their homeland and blocking others from crossing the border from Mexico.
Migrants, many from Haiti, wade across the Rio Grande river from Del Rio, Texas, to return to Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021. The US is flying Haitians camped in a Texas border town back to their homeland and blocking others from crossing the border from Mexico.

Desperate to not return back to Haiti, some migrants have begun moving from Texas back into Mexico. CNBC reported that at least 100 migrants were heading back to Mexico.

As of Sunday, September 19, the US had flown 3,300 Haitians back to Haiti. 

Haitian migrants were captured on photo wading through the Rio Grande.
CIUDAD ACUNA, MEXICO - SEPTEMBER 20: Haitian immigrants cross the Rio Grande back into Mexico from Del Rio, Texas on September 20, 2021 to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico. As U.S. immigration authorities began deporting immigrants back to Haiti from Del Rio, thousands more waited in a camp under an international bridge in Del Rio while others crossed the river back into Mexico to avoid deportation.
Haitian immigrants cross the Rio Grande back into Mexico from Del Rio, Texas on September 20, 2021 to Ciudad Acuna, Mexico. As US immigration authorities began deporting immigrants back to Haiti from Del Rio, thousands more waited in a camp under an international bridge in Del Rio while others crossed the river back into Mexico to avoid deportation.
Some migrants also crossed the Rio Grande in search of food and other resources.
Haitian migrants cross the Rio Grande to get food and supplies near the Del Rio-Acun?a Port of Entry in Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila state, Mexico on September 18, 2021. - The mayor of Del Rio, Texas declared a state of emergency on September 17, 2021 after more than 10,000 undocumented migrants, many of them Haitians, poured into the border city in a fresh test of President Joe Biden's immigration policy. Del Rio Mayor Bruno Lozano said that the migrants were crowded in an area controlled by the US Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) beneath the Del Rio International Bridge, which carries traffic across the Rio Grande river into Mexico.
Haitian migrants cross the Rio Grande to get food and supplies near the Del Rio-Acuna Port of Entry in Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila state, Mexico on September 18, 2021.
US Customs and Border Patrol agents were photographed using whips to prevent Haitian migrants from joining the other Haitian migrants in Del Rio, Texas.
United States Border Patrol agents on horseback try to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on September 19, 2021. - US law enforcement are attempting to close off crossing points along the Rio Grande river where migrants cross to get food and water, which is scarce in the encampment. The United States said Saturday it would ramp up deportation flights for thousands of migrants who flooded into the Texas border city of Del Rio, as authorities scramble to alleviate a burgeoning crisis for President Joe Biden's administration.
United States Border Patrol agents on horseback try to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on September 19, 2021.

Those who tried to return with resources on Sunday were met by US Customs and Border Patrol agents on horseback who were armed with whips.

"I have seen some of the footage," Jen Psaki, White House press secretary, said to reporters during a news briefing on Monday, referring to video of the CBP agents scattering migrants. "I don't have the full context. I can't imagine what context would make that appropriate, but I don't have additional details. … I don't think anyone seeing that footage would think it was acceptable or appropriate."

According to The Washington Post, the Border Patrol agents eventually let the migrants in through the border. 

Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said in a tweet on Monday that the current "immigration system is designed for cruelty towards and dehumanization of immigrants." 

"This is a stain on our country," she continued.

"Video and photos coming out of Del Rio showing US Border Patrol's mistreatment of Haitian migrants along the border are horrific and disturbing," Chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, Rep. Bennie G. Thompson, told The Post.

"This mistreatment runs counter to our American values and cannot be tolerated," he added.

The Department of Homeland Security responded to the footage on Monday.
United States Border Patrol agents on horseback tries to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on September 19, 2021. - The United States said Saturday it would ramp up deportation flights for thousands of migrants who flooded into the Texas border city of Del Rio, as authorities scramble to alleviate a burgeoning crisis for President Joe Biden's administration.
United States Border Patrol agents on horseback tries to stop Haitian migrants from entering an encampment on the banks of the Rio Grande near the Acuna Del Rio International Bridge in Del Rio, Texas on September 19, 2021.

The Department of Homeland Security said that CBP is currently investigating the crisis, according to PBS anchor Yamiche Alcindor.

"Secretary Mayorkas visited Del Rio today and witnessed the extraordinary work of DHS personnel," DHS spokesperson said in the statement. "The footage is extremely troubling and the facts learned from the full investigation, which will be conducted swiftly, will define the appropriate disciplinary actions to be taken."

"We are committed to processing migrants in a safe, orderly, and humane way. We can and must do this in a way that ensures the safety and dignity of migrants," the statement concluded.

DHS and CBP did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment. 

The Biden-Harris Administration will continue invoking Title 42 - an order issued by Trump.
Migrants, many from Haiti, board a bus after they were processed and released after spending time at a makeshift camp near the International Bridge, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. The U.S. is flying Haitians camped at Texas border town back to their homeland and trying to block others from crossing the border from Mexico.
Migrants, many from Haiti, board a bus after they were processed and released after spending time at a makeshift camp near the International Bridge, Monday, Sept. 20, 2021, in Del Rio, Texas. The US is flying Haitians camped at Texas border town back to their homeland and trying to block others from crossing the border from Mexico.

The Biden-Harris administration has challenged courts for the ability to invoke Title 42 and despite activists' cries to end it.

"If you come to the US illegally, you will be returned," said Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas at a Monday news conference. "Your journey will not succeed."

Title 42 is an immigration policy issued by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention during Trump's presidency that allows the swift deportation of migrants as a measure to keep COVID-19 from spreading.

Steven Forester, an immigration policy coordinator at the US-based Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti, told Al Jazeera that the order is entirely "unconscionable."

"There's no way Haiti can handle the people that are in Haiti now given the conditions there. It can't provide for these people," he added.

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24 Republican state attorneys general signed a letter calling Biden’s vaccine mandate ‘illegal’

President Joe Biden speaks in the State Dining Room at the White House, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, in Washington. Biden is announcing sweeping new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as 100 million Americans in an all-out effort to increase COVID-19 vaccinations and curb the surging delta variant.
President Joe Biden speaks in the State Dining Room at the White House, Thursday, Sept. 9, 2021, in Washington. Biden is announcing sweeping new federal vaccine requirements affecting as many as 100 million Americans in an all-out effort to increase COVID-19 vaccinations and curb the surging delta variant.
  • 24 state attorneys general signed a letter demanding that Biden change his vaccine mandate.
  • The letter says Biden's strategy is "a threat to individual liberty" and "a public health disaster."
  • GOP lawmakers have bristled at Biden's efforts to encourage people to get the COVID-19 vaccine.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

All but two of the Republican state attorneys general signed a seven-page letter demanding that the Biden administration modify the vaccine mandate part of President Joe Biden's COVID-19 strategy, or they will take legal action against it.

The letter, which was addressed to the president on September 16, reads: "We thus urge you to reconsider your unlawful and harmful plan and allow people to make their own decisions. If your Administration does not alter its course, the undersigned state Attorneys General will seek every available legal option to hold you accountable and uphold the rule of law."

Attorneys general from Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Texas, and Utah are among the 24 who signed the letter.

Biden's "Path out of the Pandemic" is a six-part approach toward driving out the COVID-19 pandemic which includes, in part, a vaccine mandate for:

  • Employers with more than 100 employees;
  • Federal workers and contractors; and
  • Healthcare workers at hospitals that accept Medicare & Medicaid

Private sector employees who choose not to get the COVID-19 vaccine will be subjected to weekly testing.

The letter calls the plan "disastrous and counterproductive" and says the dangers of the coronavirus don't demand an OSHA emergency mandate.

"Mr. President, your vaccination mandate represents not only a threat to individual liberty, but a public health disaster that will displace vulnerable workers and exacerbate a nationwide hospital staffing crisis, with severe consequences for all Americans," the letter reads.

The attorneys general predicted it will result in "at least some Americans" quitting their jobs instead - putting a strain on companies, the labor market, and all employees - regardless of their vaccination status.

According to The New York Times, the daily average of positive cases as of September 15 is 152,605; the daily average of hospitalizations is 98,449; and the daily average of deaths is approximately 1,943. Also according to The Times, an estimated 666,816 people have died from COVID-19 in the United States so far and 54% of Americans are fully vaccinated.

"We've been patient, but our patience is wearing thin," Biden said while announcing his latest strategy to rein in the pandemic. "And your refusal has cost all of us."

The White House did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

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