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Arizona State University student organizations are asking the college to ban Kyle Rittenhouse, who they said is ‘a beacon for white supremacy’

Kyle Rittenhouse enters the courtroom to hear the verdicts in his trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wis., on Friday, Nov. 19, 2021.
Kyle Rittenhouse enters the courtroom to hear the verdicts in his trial at the Kenosha County Courthouse in Kenosha, Wis., on Friday, Nov. 19, 2021.
  • ASU student organizations will protest Wednesday and ask the college to ban Kyle Rittenhouse.
  • Rittenhouse was previously enrolled as an online non-degree-seeking student at ASU.
  • Following his acquittal, Rittenhouse said he wants to return to ASU to finish his degree in person.

On Wednesday, several student organizations at Arizona State University will hold a protest and ask the institution to ban Kyle Rittenhouse, who was previously enrolled in its online program prior to being acquitted two weeks ago of multiple homicide charges.

Members of Students for Socialism ASU, Students for Justice in Palestine, Mecha de ASU, and the Multicultural Solidarity Coalition created a list of demands asking the university to ban Rittenhouse, condemn white supremacy, and reinvest funds from campus police into student programs like the Multicultural Center.

"We're protesting because this is going to bring real consequences to our campus, or whichever campus he goes to, or wherever he goes. His trial has already brought a consequence in that, now, he set a precedent that allows people to kill protesters, even more than they had the right to do it before," said an SFS spokesperson, whose identity was confirmed by Insider.

The student organizations involved in the Rittenhouse protest have banded together before to protest issues like police violence, as well as visits from Immigration Customs and Enforcement officials, US Border Patrol officers, and former Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio.

When SFS members discovered that Rittenhouse was listed in the online student directory, they began to organize and create their list of demands. ASU officials confirmed that Rittenhouse is not currently enrolled in any classes and did not have to go through admissions to enroll as an online non-degree-seeking student.

However, Rittenhouse said he dropped his two online classes at ASU because of the pressure of the trial but wants to pick them back up, complete them, and finish his degree in person on campus, according to WBTW.

An SFS spokesperson said that Rittenhouse's admission as a student would signal that white supremacy is welcome on campus, citing a barrage of racial slurs and anti-Semitic language used by his supporters in comments and messages directed to the protest's organizers.

"His whole base of supporters kind of proves by default that Kyle Rittenhouse is a beacon for white supremacy. He might say that he supports Black Lives Matter, but what does he have to show for it?" the spokesperson said.

Insider has reached out to ASU officials for comment, as well as to confirm when Rittenhouse applied to its online program and the date his application was approved.

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Many of the 200 witnesses interviewed by the January 6 committee are Trump administration staffers who voluntarily came forward

Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., questions witnesses during the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol on July 27, 2021 at the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC.
Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., questions witnesses during the House Select Committee investigating the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol on July 27, 2021 at the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC.
  • Rep. Zoe Lofgren said former Trump officials "provided important insights" to the committee.
  • Lofgren told CNN that some witnesses would only testify if they had a subpoena for "cover."
  • Lofgren dismissed an executive privilege claim from Mark Meadows, who did not comply with a subpoena.

Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., a member of the US House Select Committee investigating the January 6 Capitol insurrection, said on Saturday that many of the more than 200 witnesses who were voluntarily interviewed by the committee are former Trump administration officials, CNN reported.

"Let me not be that specific, but let me say certainly there have been people, part of the Trump administration, who have spoken to us and provided important insights that have led us to further questions," said Lofgren in response to questions about if they were White House staffers, according to CNN.

Some of the witnesses volunteered their testimony on the condition of being issued a supoena for "cover," Lofgren told CNN.

Additionally, she dismissed an executive privilege claim on Saturday from Donald Trump's former White House chief of staff, Mark Meadows, CNN reported. The committee is currently weighing whether to hold Meadows in criminal contempt of Congress for refusing to comply with a subpoena related to its investigation.

Meadows failed to meet the November 12 deadline to sit for a deposition before the committee and to hand over documents related to its probe.

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After nearly three decades in Congress, House Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson has announced her retirement

Portrait of American politician Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson, Washington DC, 1990s.
Portrait of American politician Congresswoman Eddie Bernice Johnson, Washington DC, 1990s.
  • Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson, D-Texas, served 15 terms in Congress before announcing her retirement.
  • Johnson worked at a Veterans Affairs hospital in Dallas and became the first nurse in Congress.
  • Throughout her 29 years on Capitol Hill, Johnson co-authored or authored 177 bills that became law.

House Democrat Eddie Bernice Johnson, 85, announced on Saturday that she will not be seeking re-election and is retiring from Congress after serving 15 terms, Politico reported.

Johnson represents Texas' 30th District, which encompasses most of Dallas county, and was the first nurse to be elected to Congress, according to her Congressional website. Her groundbreaking career began at the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Dallas, where she became the first African-American woman to serve as chief psychiatric nurse.

Between 1972 and 1992, Johnson served both the state House of Representatives and Senate before winning her Congressional seat in 1993, according to Ballotpedia. Throughout her tenure on Capitol Hill, she was credited with authoring and co-authoring more than 177 bills that signed into law, according to her biography.

Johnson became the first African-American and woman to chair the House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology and is the highest-ranking Texan on the House Transportation and Infrastructure committee, according to her biography.

"Whether you are from Dallas or not, nearly every Texan has benefited in some way from the work of Congresswoman Johnson. Her legacy is remarkable, and I can tell you firsthand from our shared work on the Transportation Committee, that no one works harder for their constituents" said US Rep. Colin Allred, D-Texas, according to the Dallas Morning News.

On Tuesday, Johnson announced that two Dallas-based infrastructure projects were awarded grants by the Department of Transportation equivalent to nearly $21 million, according to a press release.

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Biden signs executive order at Tribal Nations Summit addressing crisis of missing and murdered Native Americans

President Joe Biden signs an executive order to help improve public safety and justice for Native Americans during a Tribal Nations Summit during Native American Heritage Month, in the South Court Auditorium on the White House campus, Monday, Nov. 15, 2021, in Washington.
President Joe Biden signs an executive order to help improve public safety and justice for Native Americans during a Tribal Nations Summit during Native American Heritage Month, in the South Court Auditorium on the White House campus, Monday, Nov. 15, 2021, in Washington.
  • A federal strategy to combat violence against Native Americans will be crafted within 240 days.
  • Attorney General Merrick Garland and Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland will lead the effort.
  • Research shows that more than 4 in 5 Native American women experience violence in their lifetime.

President Joe Biden signed an executive order Monday during the Tribal Nations Summit instructing federal departments and agencies to coordinate with tribal governments on a trauma-informed, victim-centered approach to address violence against Native Americans.

"Generations of Native Americans have experienced violence or mourned a missing or murdered family member or loved one, and the lasting impacts of such tragedies are felt throughout the country," Biden wrote in his executive order. "Native Americans face unacceptably high levels of violence, and are victims of violent crime at a rate much higher than the national average."

The order charged Attorney General Merrick Garland and Secretary of the Interior Deb Haaland with identifying resources and developing a larger strategy to combat the crisis within 240 days. Their responsibilities include:

  • Addressing unsolved cases involving Native Americans
  • Coordinating with the Department of Justice, the Department of the Interior, and the Department of Homeland Security in their efforts to end human trafficking
  • Expanding tribal participation in the Amber Alert in Indian Country initiative 
  • Building on and enhancing national training programs for federal agents and prosecutors
  • Creating an outreach services liaison position within the Department of Justice for criminal cases where the federal government has jurisdiction

Biden's executive order also instructs Garland to improve data collection and information-sharing practices with tribal nations. He is tasked with assessing the current use of DNA testing and database services to identify missing or murdered Indigenous people and make recommendations on improving usage and accessibility of the tools.

Additionally, Haaland was charged with exploring proactive approaches to combatting the crisis of violence against Native Americans, such as strengthening prevention, early intervention, and victim and survivor services.

Native women disproportionately face sexual and gender-based violence. Research from the National Congress of American Indians shows that more than 4 in 5 Native women have experienced violence in their lifetime and more than half have experienced sexual violence, the vast majority at the hands of non-Native perpetrators.

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Elon Musk initiates another Twitter fight by squabbling with Bernie Sanders over extreme wealth

Bernie Sanders and Elon Musk
Bernie Sanders and Elon Musk
  • Sen. Bernie Sanders tweeted Sunday that extremely wealthy Americans should pay their "fair share."
  • Tesla CEO Elon Musk responded to Sanders by offering to sell more of the stock that he owns.
  • Over the last week, Musk cashed in nearly $7 billion in Tesla stock.

Elon Musk has a long history of publicizing his opinions on Twitter, On Sunday, he continued this trend by sparring with Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., over extreme wealth and stocks.

In response to a tweet from Sanders demanding that extremely wealthy Americans "pay their fair share," Musk replied, "I keep forgetting that you're still alive."

Musk responded to a joke about Sanders from another user with a laughing emoji, and offered to sell more of his Tesla stock.

Over the last week, Musk has cashed in nearly $7 billion in Tesla stock, according to Securities and Exchange Commission filings. He even ran a poll on his Twitter asking his followers to vote on whether he should sell the stock, despite the fact that he'd already put a sales plan in motion nearly two months prior, according to regulatory filings.

Musk hinted at a billionaire tax proposed by Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., in the Twitter poll, which would tax unrealized capital gains on assets, including stocks. While the value of Tesla's stock soared during the pandemic and made Musk the world's richest man, the business magnate has repeatedly slammed the Democratic tax proposal, which would leave him with a $10 billion annual bill based on projections.

Insider has reached out to Sanders and Musk for comment.

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A GOP gubernatorial candidate complained about mail-in voting after his daughter’s ballot arrived late. Officials say she applied to vote in the wrong county.

In this Oct. 17, 2018 photo, U.S. Attorney William McSwain speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Philadelphia.
In this Oct. 17, 2018 photo, U.S. Attorney William McSwain speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Philadelphia.
  • Bill McSwain tweeted that his daughter's mail-in ballot arrived two days after Election Day.
  • Election official Lisa Deeley told McSwain that his daughter registered to vote in the wrong county.
  • Because of US Postal Service funding cuts, election officials urged voters to request ballots early.

Pennsylvania GOP gubernatorial candidate Bill McSwain tweeted that the state's voting system is broken after his daughter's mail-in ballot arrived after Election Day. A state election official responded that his daughter attempted to register as a voter in the wrong county.

"My daughter ordered a mail-in ballot 3 weeks ago and it arrived yesterday - 2 days AFTER Election Day, what a joke! We need to fix this broken system so that everyone can make their voice heard and every legal vote is counted," McSwain tweeted.

Lisa Deeley, chair of the Philadelphia City Commissioners, responded that McSwain's daughter applied to vote on October 17 in a county that did not correspond with her address. The commissioners are in charge of elections and voter registration for the city of Philadelphia, according to the board's website.

"Your daughter applied to the wrong county on 10/17, it was transferred to us on 10/20 we mailed it to the requested address in West Chester the next day. This issue is the results of the disastrous cuts to the @USPS which underscores the need to accept ballots postmarked by [Election Day]," Deeley tweeted.

As cuts were made to the US Postal Service during the pandemic, Americans began experiencing service disruptions, prompting many to worry about timely delivery of ballots during elections. Officials throughout the country have urged voters to request their ballots as soon as possible, with some states expanding mail-in voting and the amount of time allotted for in-person voting to counteract delivery uncertainty.

Insider has reached out to McSwain and Deeley for comment.

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Rapper Roddy Ricch will donate the money he earned for performing at Astroworld to families whose loved ones died at the festival

American rapper Roddy Ricch performs on stage during the Astroworld Fest 2021 at NRG Park on November 5, 2021 in Houston, Texas.
American rapper Roddy Ricch performs on stage during the Astroworld Fest 2021 at NRG Park on November 5, 2021 in Houston, Texas.
  • American rapper Roddy Ricch performed on Friday at the Astroworld Festival in Houston.
  • A mass casualty event occurred as thousands pushed toward the stage to watch Travis Scott perform.
  • Ricch announced on Instagram that he'd donate his earnings from the festival to victims' families.

Following a mass casualty event at the Astroworld music festival on Friday, American rapper Roddy Ricch announced on Instagram that he would donate the compensation he received from performing to the victims' families.

"I'll be donating my net compensation to the families of this incident," Ricch said, adding the hashtag, #Pray4Houston.

Any family members of the victims are asked to contact Ricch's manager, Shawn Holiday.

Officials in Houston are still investigating the events of October 5, which left eight people dead and hundreds more injured during a performance by Travis Scott, the festival's headliner and organizer. The mass casualty event was triggered by an influx of nearly 50,000 people pushing toward the stage as Scott began performing.

"The crowd began to compress towards the front of the stage, and that caused some panic, and it started causing some injuries," Houston Fire Chief Samuel Peña told reporters at a news conference. "People began to fall out, become unconscious, and it created additional panic."

Among the victims of the surge were two minors, two 21-year-olds, two 23-year-olds, a 27-year-old, and another person whose age was unknown, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner said. Names of the victims have not been released to the public.

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Police say Narcan was used on a security officer at Astroworld who passed out and had a prick on his neck that looked like a possible injection

Houston Police Chief Troy Finner speaks during a news conference, Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Houston, after several people died and scores were injured during a music festival the night before.
Houston Police Chief Troy Finner speaks during a news conference, Saturday, Nov. 6, 2021, in Houston, after several people died and scores were injured during a music festival the night before.
  • At least 8 attendees died during Travis Scott's performance in Houston on Friday night.
  • Medical staff working the event said they revived a security officer who they alleged was drugged.
  • Overdose expert Peter Davidson said it's unlikely the security officer was injected with drugs.

Houston Police Department Chief Troy Finner said during a press conference Saturday that medical staff at Travis Scott's Astroworld Festival reported a security officer was administered Narcan after attempting to restrain an attendee.

"We do have a report of a security officer, according to the medical staff that was out and treated him last night, that he was reaching over to restrain or grab a citizen and he felt a prick in his neck," Finner said.

The medical staff examined the unconscious security officer and administered Narcan, an emergency treatment for opioid overdoses, Finner said at the press briefing. He added that medical staff noticed a prick on the individual's neck.

"A lot of narratives out there right now. A lot of them," Finner said. "We just ask that y'all give us time to do a proper investigation."

When individuals are revived with Narcan, toxicology is rarely conducted, making it difficult to verify what exactly happened, according to Peter Davidson, an associate professor of medicine at the University of California San Diego and expert on drug overdoses.

Narcan is a nasal spray prescription medicine that is used to treat known or suspected opioid overdoses. The medicine is considered an "opioid antagonist," meaning it attaches to opioid receptors, reversing and blocking the effects of opioids, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Dr. Ryan Marino, medical director of toxicology and addiction medicine at University Hospitals in Cleveland, told Insider that stories about people doling out their own expensive drugs to strangers or trying to inject people with needles are "almost always nothing more than urban legends and are not borne in reality."

Davidson concurred that it is "pretty unlikely" that the security officer was injected with drugs.

"If it did happen, it would be staggeringly rare. This is not typically the way that people assault one another," Davidson told Insider.

Still, Davidson added that he has no criticism of the medical team that administered Narcan in case the security officer overdosed. If Narcan is administered to someone who does not have any opioids in their system, it will have no effect on them, Davidson said.

Marino also advocated that Narcan should be readily available at places like festivals.

In addition to the security officer incident, at least 8 attendees died and another 300 were injured in a mass casualty event during Scott's performance on Friday night. Organizers ended the event and canceled the second day of the festival.

Insider has reached out to HPD for comment.

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Watch: Omarosa reveals Donald Trump was ‘fascinated with looking at the KKK garb’ at a Mississippi civil rights museum the day she was fired

Donald Trump and Omarosa Manigault attend the "All-Star Celebrity Apprentice" Red Carpet Event at Trump Tower on April 1, 2013 in New York City.
Donald Trump and Omarosa Manigault attend the "All-Star Celebrity Apprentice" Red Carpet Event at Trump Tower on April 1, 2013 in New York City.
  • Donald Trump and Omarosa Manigault Newman first met in the early 2000s.
  • Manigault Newman said Trump was 'obsessed' with a white supremacist display in a museum.
  • Additionally, Manigault Newman said Trump told her classified national security information.

In a TikTok from the Australian show "Big Brother VIP," Omarosa Manigault Newman revealed several shocking revelations about her time in the White House under former President Donald Trump, including an incidence of leaked classified information.

The pair was first acquainted in the early 2000s when Manigault Newman was a contestant on Trump's reality TV show, "The Apprentice." Their association continued through the production of two additional TV shows and Trump's presidential campaign, according to an ABC News timeline of their relationship.

Following the 2016 election, Manigault Newman became an official in the Trump administration, serving as assistant to the president and director of communications for the Office of Public Liaison until January 20, 2018, ABC News reported.

Her departure was announced days after Trump and several White House officials traveled to Jackson, Mississippi, for the opening of a civil rights museum, a trip Manigault Newman said she helped organize.

"It didn't go so well because he was fascinated with looking at the KKK garb," Manigault Newman said during a clip of her latest reality TV appearance. "He was obsessed with the white supremacist kind of display."

@bigbrotherau

Omarosa is here to spill ALL the tea on Trump ☕️ #bbvip #bbau #bigbrother #trump #tea #gossip

♬ original sound - BigBrotherAU

She also alleged that Trump would ask for her advice on subjects outside her purview, such as Pentagon activities and veterans affairs, which she said "she had no business advising him on."

Additionally, Manigault Newman alleged that Trump told her when he decided to bomb Syria, despite the fact that she did not have the classification level to know such information about national security.

"And so, I bounced. I said, 'Donald, I'm out. You need to really talk to your advisers,'" Manigault Newman said in the "Big Brother VIP" TikTok.

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Sinema, Manchin pump the brakes on a proposed fee for methane emissions, the second largest contributor to global greenhouse gas emissions

U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) speaks during a United States Senate Committee on Finance hearing to consider Chris Magnus's nomination to be Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection on October 19, 2021 in Washington, DC.
U.S. Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) speaks during a United States Senate Committee on Finance hearing to consider Chris Magnus's nomination to be Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection on October 19, 2021 in Washington, DC.
  • President Joe Biden signed a pledge Tuesday to significantly reduce US methane emissions.
  • Sen. Joe Manchin called the methane emissions proposal "an unreasonable, punitive fee."
  • Methane accounts for more than a quarter of the warming that Earth is currently experiencing.

Democrats are struggling to salvage climate change provisions in the Biden administration's Build Back Better agenda, including a proposed fee on methane emissions that Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., is currently questioning and undecided on, Axios reported.

Additional members of Congress - Sen. Joe Manchin, Rep. Henry Cuellar, and multiple Texas Democrats - have outright opposed the fee, even as President Joe Biden joined more than 90 governments in signing a pledge to significantly reduce methane emissions at a global climate summit on Tuesday, according to Axios.

Sen. Tom Carper, D-Del., chairman of the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, has been fighting for the inclusion of a methane fee. He said in an interview with Roll Call that he has been negotiating with Manchin, who called the proposal "an unreasonable, punitive fee" on natural gas and oil companies in a September 7 letter to Carpel and Sen. Shelley Moore Capito, R-W.Va.

"We have designed it to not be punitive, but to be supportive and encouraging of companies to go ahead and begin making reductions within the next couple of years," Carper told Axios.

In 2019, methane accounted for about 10% of all US greenhouse gas emissions from human activities, such as leaks from natural gas systems and raising livestock, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Methane accounts for more than a quarter of the warming that Earth is currently experiencing and is the second-largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions after carbon dioxide, The New York Times reported.

If a methane fee is passed in the US, it could spur decades-long economic growth, add $250 billion to the country's gross domestic product, and create more than 70,000 jobs by 2050, according to nonpartisan energy and climate policy firm Energy Innovation.

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