Archive for Mark Matousek

David Tennant said he felt strange marrying the daughter of another actor who played Doctor Who

Doctor Who
David Tennant played Doctor Who from 2005 to 2010.
  • Actor David Tennant told the BBC's Gaby Roslin that it felt strange marrying the daughter of another actor who played Doctor Who.
  • Tennant met his wife, Georgia Moffett, in 2008. The two got married three years later.
  • Moffett said she aggressively courted Tennant.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Actor David Tennant said it felt strange to marry the daughter of an actor who played Doctor Who before his five-year run in the role.

"Because 'Doctor Who' had run through my life like a stick of rock, to end up marrying the daughter of one of the doctors, it all felt a bit stupid," Tennant told the BBC's Gaby Roslin, according to The Independent. (A recording of the interview did not appear to be available as of Saturday. Roslin said a podcast episode including the conversation will be released on Monday.)

Tennant met his wife, the actress Georgia Moffett, after she appeared on the show in 2008. The two got married in 2011 and have five children. Moffett's father, Peter Davison, starred on "Doctor Who" from 1981 to 1984.

Moffett told Roslin she put a lot of effort into courting Tennant, saying they wouldn't have dated had she not been persistent, according to The Independent.

"I was very much the driving force," Moffett reportedly told Roslin. "Had I not worked quite so hard, it might not have happened."

Tennant said he felt fortunate to have met Moffett, according to The Scotsman.

"I certainly feel like I lucked out," he reportedly said.

Tennant has appeared in a number of films and television shows since leaving "Doctor Who." The actor's most recent show, "Des," premiered in September. Moffett has appeared on two "Doctor Who" spin-off series and starred with Tennant in "Staged" this year.

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Utah landlord evicted an 18-year-old woman for disturbing the peace in her apartment after she shared suicidal thoughts with her roommates, reports say

utah valley university entrance v3
The woman was a student at Utah Valley University, which did not own or operate the building she was evicted from.
  • A Utah landlord evicted an 18-year-old woman after she described suicidal thoughts to her roommates, The Salt Lake Tribune reported.
  • The woman received a letter alleging she had violated the terms of her lease by interfering with her roommates' "quiet enjoyment" of their apartment and committing "recklessly [sic] endangerment of human life, assault, harassment, nuisance, disturbance of the peace."
  • The woman told The Salt Lake Tribune she has contacted the building's management but has not received a response.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A Utah landlord evicted an 18-year-old woman from her student-housing apartment after she shared suicidal thoughts with her roommates, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. The newspaper didn't disclose the woman's name because she requested anonymity due to the story's sensitive subject matter.

The landlord reportedly placed the eviction letter on the woman's door on October 13. The woman, who is now living with a friend, described the landlord's actions as "hurtful" to The Salt Lake Tribune.

"The landlord is telling me not to live here because I was having suicidal thoughts," she told the newspaper. "That's not something I can help. And it's just hurtful."

The woman told The Salt Lake Tribune she's had depression since her mother's death in September 2018. Academic and coronavirus-related stress exacerbated her symptoms, she told the newspaper, leading her to discuss her emotional state, including her suicidal thoughts, with her roommates three weeks before she received the eviction notice. The roommates dismissed her concerns, a family friend of the woman's told The Salt Lake Tribune, and the woman became more isolated.

The landlord's letter, a photo of which The Sale Lake Tribune includes in its story, suggests the woman's roommates told the building's management about the mental-health struggles she had described. The letter alleges the woman had violated the terms of her lease, citing rules against interfering with her roommates' "quiet enjoyment" of their apartment or committing "any recklessly [sic] endangerment of human life, assault, harassment, nuisance, disturbance of the peace."

"We have been made aware that you have vocalized suicidal tendencies which has caused undo [sic] stress and alarm to your roommates," the letter said. 

The woman told The Salt Lake Tribune she has contacted the building's management but has not received a response.

A representative at Utah Valley University, which the woman had attended before dropping her classes, told The Salt Lake Tribune that the school felt for the woman but couldn't address the situation because it doesn't own or operate the building she lived in. 

Ventana Student Housing, which owns the building the woman was evicted from, did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

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Utah landlord evicted an 18-year-old woman for disturbing the peace in her apartment after she shared suicidal thoughts with her roommates, reports say

utah valley university entrance v3
The woman was a student at Utah Valley University, which did not own or operate the building she was evicted from.
  • A Utah landlord evicted an 18-year-old woman after she described suicidal thoughts to her roommates, The Salt Lake Tribune reported.
  • The woman received a letter alleging she had violated the terms of her lease by interfering with her roommates' "quiet enjoyment" of their apartment and committing "recklessly [sic] endangerment of human life, assault, harassment, nuisance, disturbance of the peace."
  • The woman told The Salt Lake Tribune she has contacted the building's management but has not received a response.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A Utah landlord evicted an 18-year-old woman from her student-housing apartment after she shared suicidal thoughts with her roommates, The Salt Lake Tribune reported. The newspaper didn't disclose the woman's name because she requested anonymity due to the story's sensitive subject matter.

The landlord reportedly placed the eviction letter on the woman's door on October 13. The woman, who is now living with a friend, described the landlord's actions as "hurtful" to The Salt Lake Tribune.

"The landlord is telling me not to live here because I was having suicidal thoughts," she told the newspaper. "That's not something I can help. And it's just hurtful."

The woman told The Salt Lake Tribune she's had depression since her mother's death in September 2018. Academic and coronavirus-related stress exacerbated her symptoms, she told the newspaper, leading her to discuss her emotional state, including her suicidal thoughts, with her roommates three weeks before she received the eviction notice. The roommates dismissed her concerns, a family friend of the woman's told The Salt Lake Tribune, and the woman became more isolated.

The landlord's letter, a photo of which The Sale Lake Tribune includes in its story, suggests the woman's roommates told the building's management about the mental-health struggles she had described. The letter alleges the woman had violated the terms of her lease, citing rules against interfering with her roommates' "quiet enjoyment" of their apartment or committing "any recklessly [sic] endangerment of human life, assault, harassment, nuisance, disturbance of the peace."

"We have been made aware that you have vocalized suicidal tendencies which has caused undo [sic] stress and alarm to your roommates," the letter said. 

The woman told The Salt Lake Tribune she has contacted the building's management but has not received a response.

A representative at Utah Valley University, which the woman had attended before dropping her classes, told The Salt Lake Tribune that the school felt for the woman but couldn't address the situation because it doesn't own or operate the building she lived in. 

Ventana Student Housing, which owns the building the woman was evicted from, did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A teenager in Houston was shot and killed while carrying a toy that looked like an AR-15: reports

guns
AR-15 rifles and other weapons are displayed on a table at a shooting range.
  • A teenager was shot and killed when he and a friend approached a man while holding a fake AR-15 rifle, KHOU-11 reported.
  • The man who shot the teen and the teen's companion were taken into custody and questioned, according to the local news station's report.
  • The Harris County Sheriff's Office has not disclosed the names of those involved in the incident.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A teenage boy in Texas was shot and killed after he and a companion approached a man with a toy gun, KHOU-11 reported. The incident reportedly took place on October 16 around 2 a.m, a Harris County Sheriff's Office representative told Business Insider.

The man who shot the teen told local law enforcement the boy and his friend had attempted to rob him while holding what looked like an AR-15 rifle, John Shannon, a captain with the Harris County Sheriff's Office, said on Twitter. After shooting one of the teens, the man called 911. 

"A victim reported he came to meet a woman & upon arrival 2 males w/a rifle tried to rob him. He had a gun and fired striking one of the robbers he then called 911," Shannon said. "The male died on scene."

Officers who arrived on the scene said the object that appeared to be an AR-15 was a toy, according to KHOU-11's report. The Harris County Sheriff's Office representative told Business Insider a plastic rifle was found near the site of the shooting.

The man who shot the teen and the teen's companion were taken into custody and questioned, KHOU-11 reported. The Harris County Sheriff's Office did not disclose the names of those involved in the incident.

Read more:

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A top Trump administration lawyer reportedly said a plan to send $200 prescription-drug coupons to seniors may be illegal

Donald Trump .JPG
President Donald Trump.
  • The Health and Human Services Department's top lawyer has described concerns that the Trump administration's plan to send prescription-drug coupons to seniors could violate election laws, Politico reported.
  • Though many would receive the coupons after the November 3 presidential election, the Trump administration reportedly wanted to send letters describing the effort to 39 million seniors this week.
  • Trump-administration officials had previously said the plan may violate rules on federal spending and Medicare-related tests, Politico reported.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Robert Charrow, general counsel for the Department of Health and Human Services, said in an internal memo that President Donald Trump's plan to send senior citizens coupons for prescription drugs may run afoul of election laws, Politico reported, citing three people with knowledge of the matter.

Trump announced the initiative in September, and his administration reportedly wanted to send letters describing the effort to millions of 39 million seniors this week. Many of those eligible for the $200 coupons would receive them after the November 3 presidential election, Politico reported.

Charrow reportedly described concerns with the initiative's proximity to the election and told members of the Trump administration to consult the Department of Justice's public integrity section about the plan. Even before Charrow's memo, officials had said the plan may violate rules on federal spending and Medicare-related tests, Politico reported.

The White House and HHS did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

Many health officials in the Trump administration were reportedly surprised when Trump announced the plan, which Politico said has lost momentum over the past two weeks. Administration members have become hesitant to appear closely involved with the initiative, Politico reported, with one telling the website the plan "is quickly becoming radioactive."

Senior Trump-administration officials had said the coupons could provide insight into whether giving Medicare recipients discounts on prescription drugs would lead them to more often take the drugs, Politico reported. Charrow has reportedly suggested sending the coupons to a randomized group of seniors to make the initiative a more valid test, but Trump reportedly wants to send them to more than half of Medicare recipients.

Seniors have favored Trump's Democratic challenger for the presidency, Joe Biden, in opinion polls, a preference reflected across many other surveys.

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A top Trump administration lawyer reportedly said a plan to send $200 prescription-drug coupons to seniors may be illegal

Donald Trump .JPG
President Donald Trump.
  • The Health and Human Services Department's top lawyer has described concerns that the Trump administration's plan to send prescription-drug coupons to seniors could violate election laws, Politico reported.
  • Though many would receive the coupons after the November 3 presidential election, the Trump administration reportedly wanted to send letters describing the effort to 39 million seniors this week.
  • Trump-administration officials had previously said the plan may violate rules on federal spending and Medicare-related tests, Politico reported.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Robert Charrow, general counsel for the Department of Health and Human Services, said in an internal memo that President Donald Trump's plan to send senior citizens coupons for prescription drugs may run afoul of election laws, Politico reported, citing three people with knowledge of the matter.

Trump announced the initiative in September, and his administration reportedly wanted to send letters describing the effort to millions of 39 million seniors this week. Many of those eligible for the $200 coupons would receive them after the November 3 presidential election, Politico reported.

Charrow reportedly described concerns with the initiative's proximity to the election and told members of the Trump administration to consult the Department of Justice's public integrity section about the plan. Even before Charrow's memo, officials had said the plan may violate rules on federal spending and Medicare-related tests, Politico reported.

The White House and HHS did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

Many health officials in the Trump administration were reportedly surprised when Trump announced the plan, which Politico said has lost momentum over the past two weeks. Administration members have become hesitant to appear closely involved with the initiative, Politico reported, with one telling the website the plan "is quickly becoming radioactive."

Senior Trump-administration officials had said the coupons could provide insight into whether giving Medicare recipients discounts on prescription drugs would lead them to more often take the drugs, Politico reported. Charrow has reportedly suggested sending the coupons to a randomized group of seniors to make the initiative a more valid test, but Trump reportedly wants to send them to more than half of Medicare recipients.

Seniors have favored Trump's Democratic challenger for the presidency, Joe Biden, in opinion polls, a preference reflected across many other surveys.

Read the original article on Business Insider