Archive for Leah Rosenbaum

Inside Spring Health’s burnout culture

Hello,

Welcome to Insider Healthcare. I'm healthcare editor Leah Rosenbaum, and today in healthcare news:

If you're new to this newsletter, sign up here. Comments, tips? Email me at [email protected] or tweet @leah_rosenbaum. Let's get to it...


First, a quick note: we won't be sending out a newsletter tomorrow, but get ready for a special Black Friday edition featuring some of our favorite reads of the month. In the meantime, have a fun and relaxing holiday!


Spring Health co-founder and CEO April Koh with three different expressions with a spiraling line behind her on a light beige background.
April Koh built a $2 billion mental-health startup by age 29. Current and former employees say she led a fast-paced culture that created panic and fear.

Read the full story>> 


Frank Mallone, 71, receiving his Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster shot from Dr. Tiffany Taliaferro at the Safeway on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Monday, October 4, 2021.
71-year-old Frank Mallone receives a Pfizer COVID-19 booster shot at the Safeway on Capitol Hill in Washington DC on October 4, 2021.
The 5 most common booster-shot side effects, according to 11,290 people in the US who've gotten boosters

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A car enters Trumbull County, Wednesday, in this photo from Nov. 17, 2021, near Warren, Ohio. Three retail pharmacy chains recklessly distributed massive amounts of pain pills in two Ohio counties, a federal jury said Tuesday
A car enters Trumbull County, Wednesday, in this photo from Nov. 17, 2021, near Warren, Ohio.
CVS, Walgreens, and Walmart helped fuel the opioid crisis, jury finds

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-Leah

Read the original article on Business Insider

Walmart has hired a new executive to lead its care organization

Hello,

Welcome to Insider Healthcare. I'm healthcare editor Leah Rosenbaum, and today in healthcare news:

If you're new to this newsletter, sign up here. Comments, tips? Email me at [email protected] or tweet @leah_rosenbaum. Let's get to it...


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The Walmart Health team in Loganville, Georgia.
Walmart has hired a Louisiana health-system exec to lead its care organization as it expands its clinics and pushes into telehealth

Read the scoop now>>


Dementia
Here is the 12-slide presentation two academics used to sell investors on their virtual cognitive-testing startup

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Bridgette Melo, 5, holds the hand of her father, Jim Melo, during her inoculation of one of two reduced 10 ug doses of the Pfizer BioNtech COVID-19 vaccine during a trial at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina September 28, 2021 in a still image from video. Video taken September 28, 2021.
Bridgette Melo, 5, holds the hand of her father, Jim Melo, during her inoculation of one of two reduced 10 microgram doses of the Pfizer BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine during a trial at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina on September 28.
CDC advisors green-light Pfizer's lower-dose COVID-19 vaccine for kids aged 5-11

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-Leah

Read the original article on Business Insider

Inside UnitedHealth’s push to use its in-house doctors to lower costs and increase profits

Hello,

Welcome to Insider Healthcare. I'm healthcare editor Leah Rosenbaum, and today in healthcare news:

If you're new to this newsletter, sign up here. Comments, tips? Email me at [email protected] or tweet @leah_rosenbaum. Let's get to it...


FILE - This Oct. 16, 2012, file photo, shows a portion of the UnitedHealth Group Inc.'s campus in Minnetonka, Minn. UnitedHealth Group reports financial results Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2020. (AP Photo/Jim Mone, File)
UnitedHealth Group Inc.'s campus in Minnetonka, Minnesota.
The health-insurance giant UnitedHealth is sending more members to in-house doctors in a bid to lower costs and increase profits

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A woman wearing a mask and blue scrubs gets a shot in a clinic.
Registered nurse Alix Zacharski, left, receives a Pfizer COVID-19 booster shot from Douglas Houghton, right, at Jackson Memorial Hospital Tuesday, Oct. 5, 2021, in Miami.
There's no Delta-specific booster coming to save you - what we have is good enough

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People hold their plaster patches after being administered doses of the AstraZeneca Covid-19 coronavirus vaccine at the Narathiwat Hospital compound in the southern province of Narathiwat on June 7, 2021, as mass vaccination rollouts begin in Thailand.
People hold their plaster patches after being administered doses of the AstraZeneca Covid-19 coronavirus vaccine.
A COVID-19 vaccine patch could produce a better immune response than an injection, an early study shows

See the study results>>


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-Leah

Read the original article on Business Insider

The FDA just authorized booster shots of Moderna’s and Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccines and is letting users mix and match shots

Japanese man receiving moderna vaccine
An employee of Japan's Suntory Holdings receives the Moderna coronavirus vaccine for Covid-19.
  • The FDA authorized booster shots of the Moderna and J&J vaccines on Wednesday.
  • The agency also authorized people to get different vaccine brand as a booster shot.
  • J&J recipients can get a booster after two months. Moderna recipients should wait six months.

The Food and Drug Administration authorized on Wednesday booster shots for Moderna's and Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccines.

The FDA said that it had authorized booster doses of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine for patients aged 65 and older as well as younger people at high risk of severe disease.

For the J&J vaccine, the FDA authorized a booster dose for anyone who has recieved the vaccine.

A third shot of Moderna for at-risk adults

The FDA's decision comes after an advisory panel unanimously voted to recommend the Moderna booster shot on October 14, saying that data shows that the booster shot leads to a strong immune response and similar side effects as the first two doses.

"We remain committed to staying ahead of the virus and following the evolving epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2," Moderna CEO Stéphane Bancel said in a statement after the committee's vote. "We look forward to making our booster available to people in the U.S. to help protect themselves against this ongoing public health emergency."

The booster shot will be half the strength of the first two Moderna vaccines, and should be given at least six months after the second dose of the vaccine.

Moderna is still studying the third booster dose, and the data that it has presented to the FDA is limited.

Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel
Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel in his Cambridge, Massachusetts office

The data includes a small sample of 149 volunteers who got the booster shot in a phase 2 trial and had their antibody levels measured and compared to antibody levels after the second dose. The research showed that the antibody levels from the booster shot reached the same level as after the second dose, but not all of the patients saw a 4-fold increase in antibodies, one of the FDA's criteria.

"The data itself is not strong," said FDA committee member Dr. Patrick Moore on October 14. Moore, a microbiology and molecular genetics professor at the University of Pittsburgh said he voted to recommend the vaccine anyway based on a "gut feeling."

The booster shots appear to be just as safe as the initial two doses of the vaccine, with most people experiencing mild to moderate side effects. This is true even though the booster shot dose is half the strength of the original two doses. Both of the original doses were 100 micrograms, while the third shot is 50 micrograms.

The most common booster shot side effects include pain at the injection site, fatigue, headache, and muscle pain.

johnson & johnson vaccine
A vial of Johnson & Johnson (Janssen's) Covid-19 vaccine.

A second J&J shot for everyone

The FDA also authorized a second dose of the Johnson & Johnson booster shot for everyone who has gotten that vaccine.

Unlike the mRNA-based shots, which are given as two doses, the J&J vaccine was initially authorized as a single-dose shot. Also unlike the mRNA shots, the FDA recommended that all 15 million people in the US who got a J&J shot be eligible for a booster shot, regardless of age or risk of severe disease.

People can get a booster shot as soon as two months after their first J&J vaccine dose.

J&J submitted data to the FDA from a study that included just 17 volunteers who got a second dose after six months. While that data appeared to meet the FDA's goals for what a booster should do, later on the FDA's review stated the results are limited by the small sample size and were also impacted by a subpar lab test J&J used.

J&J also has data from a much larger trial of 16,000 volunteers who got a booster shot after only two months. While this data hasn't been independently verified by FDA scientists, it does show more evidence of the benefit of a booster shot.

"We now have generated evidence that a booster shot further increases protection against COVID-19 and is expected to extend the duration of protection significantly," Dr. Paul Stoffels, J&J's chief scientific officer, said in a September news release.

FDA also endorses mix & match for booster shots

The FDA also authorized a "mix-and-match" approach for Americans seeking booster shots, allowing Americans to receive a different brand of COVID-19 vaccine as a booster than the one they initially received. These vaccines are also called "heterologous" booster shots.

Recent results from a new study found that an mRNA booster shot after the J&J shot might lead to a better immune response compared to a second J&J booster.

This "mix-and-match" trial enrolled 458 people who had been vaccinated with either Pfizer's, Moderna's, or J&J's vaccine, then offered a boost of one of those three brands. J&J recipients saw a significantly larger jump in virus-fighting antibody levels with a Moderna or Pfizer booster compared to a second J&J shot.

"What the study shows is that regardless of what an individual received originally, getting boosted with one of the three vaccines that we evaluated, the one from Moderna, the one from Janssen, the one from Pfizer, led to good antibody responses in each of the groups," lead study author Dr. Robert Atmar from Baylor College of Medicine told Insider at the time.

Read the original article on Business Insider

What’s at stake for Apple’s future in healthcare

Hello,

Welcome to Insider Healthcare. I'm healthcare editor Leah Rosenbaum, and this week in healthcare news:

If you're new to this newsletter, sign up here. Comments, tips? Email me at [email protected] or tweet @leah_rosenbaum. Let's get to it...


Tim Cook, Sumbul Desai, and Jeff Williams in the center with an Apple watch to the left of Desai and to the right of Williams with a pale yellow heartbeat line behind them on a red background.

Inside Apple's troubled healthcare division

Apple, the world's most valuable company, has been trying to break into the healthcare scene for more than half a decade. So why hasn't it gotten as far as its competitors, Google and Amazon?

Investigative reporting by Blake Dodge found that the company's healthcare division has been marred by high-level departures, setbacks and deep organizational problems.

Get the full scoop>>

Apple dreamed of making healthcare easy. Then it silenced its medical experts.


Collage of serial founders and entrepreneurs in the biotech industry 4x3
Meet the next generation of biotech's serial entrepreneurs

It's not uncommon for biotech companies to have founders in common. Some preeminent entrepreneurs like George Church or Robert Langer have had a hand in the founding of dozens of successful companies.

Now, Allison DeAngelis reveals the next generation of serial biotech entrepreneurs.

They're all under 45, and have started at least three companies. Keep an eye on them - we're betting they are going to do big things.

See the list>>

Power players: These 12 young serial founders are building the next generation of biotech startups


Doctor and patient.
Doctor and patient.
Patient advocates are fighting medical record giants for access to their own health data

Patient medical records across the US are fragmented - meaning that your full medical history often isn't accessible in different hospital systems.

As Mohana Ravindranath reveals, this can lead to dangerous situations.

But Mohana reports that there is a growing group of patients who are fighting to pry their medical records back from the hold of software giants like Epic and Cerner.

It's a David and Goliath story between patients and a $14.5 billion industry.

Read the story>>

The $14.5 billion health records industry has a hold on patient data - now advocates are fighting back


More stories that kept us busy this week:


-Leah

Read the original article on Business Insider

It’s open season for coronavirus vaccine boosters

Hello,

Welcome to Insider Healthcare. I'm healthcare editor Leah Rosenbaum, and today in healthcare news:

If you're new to this newsletter, sign up here. Comments, tips? Email me at [email protected] or tweet @leah_rosenbaum. Let's get to it...


vaccine france older
A pharmacist administers the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine to a patient in a pharmacy in Roubaix as part of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccination campaign in France, March 15, 2021.

Welcome to open season for COVID-19 booster shots

Read more here>>


healthcare worker in mask, smiling, getting booster shot.
A Thai healthcare worker receives a booster dose of Pfizer's vaccine in Bangkok on August 9, 2021.
4 people who got COVID-19 booster shots share what it felt like to get an extra vaccine dose

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Magic mushrooms
Psilocybin found in magic mushrooms is a type of psychedelic
The 3 most powerful psychedelics VCs dish on what they look for - and avoid - when investing in new companies

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More stories we're reading:


- Leah

Read the original article on Business Insider