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Nancy Pelosi says she will create a ‘9/11-type’ commission to investigate the Capitol insurrection

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference with House impeachment managers on the fifth day of the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, on charges of inciting the deadly attack on the US Capitol, in Washington, DC, on February 13, 2021.
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during a news conference with House impeachment managers on the fifth day of the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, on charges of inciting the deadly attack on the US Capitol, in Washington, DC, on February 13, 2021.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced plans on Monday to create a "9/11-type commission" to investigate the January 6 Capitol insurrection.

She announced her plan for the commission in a letter to House Democrats that was shared on her website.

"To protect our security, our security, our security, our next step will be to establish an outside, independent 9/11-type Commission," she wrote. The commission would "investigate and report on the facts and causes relating to the January 6, 2021 domestic terrorist attack upon the United States Capitol Complex," she wrote.

She said she also wanted the panel to look into the "preparedness and response" from Capitol police and other law enforcement officers at the attack, in which five people, including a Capitol Police officer, died.

Pelosi said that retired Lt. General Russel Honoré has been reviewing the Capitol's "security infrastructure" in the weeks since the riot, and is currently looking into how to ensure an attack does not happen again.

"He has been working with Committees of Jurisdiction and will continue to make proposals. It is clear from his findings and from the impeachment trial that we must get to the truth of how this happened," she said.

Nearly six weeks after the pro-Trump rioters stormed the Capitol, more than 5,000 National Guard troops are still stationed at the Capitol complex, and are expected to stay until at least mid-March, Reuters reported.

More than 250 people have been charged in connection to the Capitol riot, though former President Donald Trump was acquitted on a charge of inciting insurrection on Saturday.

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Canada apologized to China after one of its diplomats ordered T-shirts saying ‘Wuhan’ styled with the Wu-Tang Clan’s logo

RZA of Wu-Tang Clan performs onstage during 10th Annual ONE Musicfest at Centennial Olympic Park on September 08, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia.
RZA of Wu-Tang Clan performs onstage during 10th Annual ONE Musicfest at Centennial Olympic Park on September 08, 2019 in Atlanta, Georgia.
  • A Canadian diplomat in China ordered custom T-shirts that said "Wuhan" in the style of Wu-Tang Clan's logo. 
  • The Wu-Tang logo is a "W," though users of China's Twitter-like Weibo described the logo as looking like a bat. 
  • Canada apologized to China for the shirts, calling the incident a "misunderstanding."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Canada has apologized to China after a diplomat of the country's Beijing Embassy ordered custom T-shirts that said "Wuhan" in the style of Wu-Tang Clan's logo.

The rap group's logo is a stylized "W," though Reuters reported that when the maker of the shirt posted images of it online, users of China's Twitter-like Weibo described the logo as looking like a bat, which scientists have suspected to carry COVID-19 before it spread to humans in Wuhan, China, in 2019.

Upon learning about the shirts, foreign ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin told the Associated Press that he wanted Canada to "thoroughly investigate the incident and give China a clear explanation."

A spokesperson from Canada's foreign service agency told Reuters that Canadian officials "regret the misunderstanding" and that the shirts weren't made to mock China's response to COVID-19.

 

"The T-shirt logo designed by a member of the Embassy shows a stylized W, and is not intended to represent a bat. It was created for the team of Embassy staff working on repatriation of Canadians from Wuhan in early 2020," the spokesperson said.

Wu-Tang clan did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment on their logo being used.

Chinese-Canadian relations have been tense in recent years - in 2018, China arrested two Canadian men and accused them of spying, and Canada detained the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, Meng Wanzhou, who is wanted in the US on fraud charges.

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A man in Pennsylvania charged in the Capitol riot is accused of attacking a police officer and causing her to lose consciousness

The FBI shared these photos in Ryan Samsel's charging documents.
The FBI shared these photos in Ryan Samsel's charging documents.
  • Ryan Stephen Samsel, of Bristol, Pennsylvania, was charged in the Capitol riot on Saturday.
  • A criminal complaint accuses Samsel of attacking a police officer and causing her to lose consciousness.
  • The FBI says Samsel picked the officer up and told her: "We don't have to hurt you, why are you standing in our way."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A man charged in the Capitol riot has been accused of attacking a police officer and causing her to lose consciousness during the insurrection. 

A criminal complaint unsealed on Monday says Ryan Stephen Samsel, of Bristol, Pennsylvania, has been charged with forcibly assaulting, resisting, opposing, impeding, intimidating, or interfering with a police officer, attempting to obstruct a police officer, and obstructing an official proceeding.

Federal investigators included number of images from a video taken during the insurrection, which show a man they identify as Samsel leading a group of rioters toward a police barricade in from of the Capitol, moments before rioters in support of former President Donald Trump breached the building on January 6.

"After removing his jacket, Samsel pushed and pulled the barricades until the crowd successfully pushed the barricades down on top of the officers," the complaint says. "In the process of pushing the barricades to the ground, Samsel and others knocked over [the US Capitol Police officer] as the crowd lifted the barricades and pushed toward the Capitol, causing [her] head to hit the stairs behind her, resulting in a loss of consciousness."

Read more: Vaccine inequity on Capitol Hill: Members of Congress got their shots but essential Hill workers are still left waiting

One image shared in the criminal complaint shows Samsel picking up the unconscious officer, who has not been publicly named.

According to the criminal complaint, Samsel told the officer: "We don't have to hurt you, why are you standing in our way."

The criminal complaint says that Samsel later attempted to take a riot shield from another Capitol Police officer.

The officer who lost consciousness was taken to safety, but hours later while arresting another rioter, she blacked out and collapsed, the criminal complaint says.

She was then taken to an emergency room where heath officials diagnosed her with a concussion, the complaint says.

Samsel was arrested on Saturday after FBI agents matched his images to images in law-enforcement databases.

It's unclear if he's still in custody, but a criminal history check found that Samsel is also wanted in Riverside, New Jersey, on assault allegations dating back to 2019, the FBI said.

Samsel is one of more than 200 people who have been charged in the Capitol insurrection, in which five people died, including a Capitol Police officer.

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The men accused of plotting to kidnap Michigan’s governor also practiced storming the state Capitol

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer introduces Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden delivers remarks about health care at Beech Woods Recreation Center October 16, 2020 in Southfield, Michigan.
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer pictured on October 16, 2020, in Southfield, Michigan.
  • Ty Garbin agreed to plead guilty in the alleged plot to kidnap Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on Wednesday.
  • Court documents filed in his plea agreement reveal new details about the case. 
  • Prosecutors say the men also practiced storming the state Capitol building and discussed attacking police.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The group of men accused of plotting to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer over the summer also practiced storming the state capitol building and discussed attacking police with weapons, according to new court documents.

New details about the alleged plot to kidnap Whitmer from her vacation home in northern Michigan were revealed in a plea agreement filed when Ty Garbin, one of the six men charged federally in the case, agreed to plea guilty on Wednesday.

Garbin, a 25-year-old from Hartland, Michigan, pleaded guilty to one count of kidnapping conspiracy.

All other men in the federal case have pleaded not guilty. Eight other people have been charged with related crimes in the alleged kidnap plot at a state level.

Court filings on Garbin's plea deal seen by Insider describe Garbin and four other defendants as members of Wolverine Watchmen, a Michigan-Based, self-styled antigovernment  "militia" group.

Prosecutors say all of the federal and state-level suspects in the case targeted Whitmer with a kidnap plot over public health orders she had put in place to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

In the court filing, prosecutors said the defendants held "training" sessions at multiple locations and prepared for a fight against police.

Prosecutors said that during training sessions in Munith, Michigan, the defendants constructed a "shoot house" out of wood that they practiced breaching with firearms "to stimulate assaulting the Capitol or elsewhere."

militia group with no political affiliation from Michigan, including Joseph Morrison (3rd R), Paul Bellar (2nd R) and Pete Musico (R) who were charged for their involvement in a plot to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, attack the state capitol building and incite violence, stand in front of the governor's office after protesters occupied the state capitol building during a vote to approve the extension of Whitmer's emergency declaration/stay-at-home order due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Lansing, Michigan, U.S. April 30, 2020.
militia group with no political affiliation from Michigan, including Joseph Morrison (3rd R), Paul Bellar (2nd R) and Pete Musico (R) who were charged for their involvement in a plot to kidnap Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer, attack the state capitol building and incite violence, stand in front of the governor's office after protesters occupied the state capitol building during a vote to approve the extension of Whitmer's emergency declaration/stay-at-home order due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Lansing, Michigan, U.S. April 30, 2020.

"The conspirators also practiced combat first aid, including applying tourniquets, applying bandages, treating cuts, burns, and gunshot and shrapnel wounds they might receive during a firefight with law enforcement," prosecutors said.

Prosecutors said that in one meeting, a defendant "reiterated the plan to storm the Michigan State Capitol, and proposed using Molotov cocktails and other improvised explosive devices to distract and hinder law enforcement during the operation."

At another training session, prosecutors said, one of the men brought a modified AR-15-type semiautomatic rifle equipped with a shortened barrel, silencer, and a 37-millimeter projectile launcher that he said could be used against police.

Authorities stopped the plot in October thanks to confidential informants and an undercover FBI agent. Upon making arrests, officials charged Garbin and five others with kidnapping conspiracy and eight on a state level with related crimes. 

Garbin appeared before a judge in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on Wednesday, and faces up to life in prison for the kidnapping conspiracy charge.

He's scheduled to be sentenced on July 8.

Prosecutors said in the plea agreement that the US Attorney's Office is still deciding whether or not it will file a motion requesting a reduction in Garbin's sentence.

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A judge approved a $17 million sexual misconduct settlement for Weinstein accusers

harvey weinstein
Harvey Weinstein exits a Manhattan court house as a jury continues with deliberations in his trial on February 20, 2020.
  • A judge in Delaware has approved a revised bankruptcy plan for the Weinstein Company. 
  • The plan includes giving $17 million in liquidated funds to women who accused disgraced film producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and misconduct.
  • Fifty-five sexual misconduct claims were filed as part of the bankruptcy case.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A judge in Delaware has approved a revised bankruptcy plan for the Weinstein Company, in which $17 million in liquidated funds will be allotted to women who have accused disgraced film producer Harvey Weinstein of sexual harassment and misconduct.

The $35 million liquidation plan, which comes nearly three years after the Weinstein Company declared bankruptcy, also provides $9.7 million in legal costs for former officers and directors of the company and $8.4 million to a trust resolving non-sexual misconduct claims, according to the Associated Press.

Attorney Beth Fegan, who represented several women in the case, told Insider that the court-approved plan provides a confidential process for Weinstein's accusers to seek compensation.

"Harvey Weinstein caused irremediable harm with his decades-long, predatory sexual abuse. Judge [Mary] Walrath's decision is the first step in bringing closure to his victims," she said in a statement. "The decision paves the way for the creation of a $17 million victims' fund by which The Weinstein Company-era survivors can apply for meaningful monetary compensation for their injuries in a confidential process."

Fegan said the process "was supported by 85% of those survivors who voted to approve the plan in the bankruptcy court." The AP said 55 women filed sexual misconduct claims as part of the case, and 39 of them had approved the settlement plan.

"FeganScott is proud to stand by its survivor-clients, Louisette Geiss, Sarah Ann Masse, and Melissa Thompson, who have unselfishly fought for more than three years for this result, which will benefit all victims," Fegan said. 

A claims examiner will determine how much money accusers will receive in their settlement through a points system, AP reported. The system will allot points for the seriousness of the allegations, corroborating evidence, prior or pending litigation, statutes of limitation, and claims of emotional distress and harm.

Attorneys for women who opposed the plan told the AP that the point system "pits women against women" and puts them in competition for settlement money.

Attorney Paul Zumbro, who represents the Weinstein Company, told CNN that the settlement allows victims to seek compensation "without having to endure the hardships and uncertainties of litigation."

Imran H. Ansari, an attorney for Weinstein, agreed in a statement to Insider.

"While there are those who continue to rail against the settlement that the court found acceptable today, the practical reality is that outside the settlement the plaintiffs face an uncertain financial recovery, with The Weinstein Company bankrupt, and Mr. Weinstein, who denies the claims against him, with a current and future financial state that is far from healthy," Ansari said. "Those yelling loudly seem to ignore, for whatever reason, that many parties have wanted this settlement to succeed, importantly, it is not just the Weinstein defendants, but the plaintiffs themselves, who likely recognize that it is the only route to a realistic recovery."

Weinstein is currently serving a 23-year prison sentence at Wende Correctional Facility in Alden, New York, following a conviction of third-degree rape and forcible sexual assault of two women.

He's also facing sexual assault charges in Los Angeles, where officials are trying to have him extradited. The LA charges are tied to alleged incidents involving five women between 2004 and 2013.

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5 people died in the Capitol insurrection. Experts say it could have been so much worse.

capitol siege riot ladder
Rioters clash with police using big ladder trying to enter Capitol building through the front doors.
  • Five people died in the Capitol insurrection on January 6, including a Capitol Police officer. 
  • But experts told Insider that the insurrection could have been much deadlier. 
  • Experts said that swift thinking to bring Congress members and staff to safety likely saved lives. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

One hundred feet and one minute.

The mob that overtook the US Capitol on January 6 was seconds away from seeing security whisk away then-Vice President Mike Pence, the Washington Post reported.

Many of the pro-Trump rioters were armed. Their goal that day, laid out in messages prosecutors have cited charging them with crimes, was to swarm the halls of government and keep Congress from certifying President Joe Biden's victory.

At least two rioters were pictured with hands full of zip-tie like restraints. Others strung a noose outside.

They shouted Pence's name and rifled through House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's office.

After then-President Donald Trump riled them up at the "Stop the Steal" rally, hundreds forced their way into the Capitol, donning QAnon attire and waving a Confederate flag.

Some rioters got within yards of an unsecured Senate chamber and were just seconds away from running into Pence when Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman veered them in another direction.

Others encountered a barricaded House chamber door as authorities frantically tried to secure the space.

capitol seige
U.S. Capitol Police with guns drawn watch as protesters try to break into the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington.

Lawmakers were eventually whisked away to secure rooms with their staff, but rioters continued to push through, and some made it to the Senate chamber - where they scaled down walls and sat at the dais where Pence had presided mere minutes before.

The day was bloody: Rioter Ashli Babbitt was fatally shot by a police officer as she tried to climb through a broken window, and multiple videos showed insurrectionists attacking overwhelmed police officers, including one, who was surrounded outside a Capitol entrance and beaten with flagpoles.

In total five people died in the Capitol insurrection, including one Capitol Police officer.

But experts told Insider that the insurrection could have been much deadlier if lawmakers hadn't been taken to safety.

"If insurrectionists had been able to get their hands on a member of Congress, particularly a member of Congress that has been vilified by right-wing media… I think you could most definitely have had bloodshed because people were so riled up and fueled with conspiracy theories and hatred," Devin Burghart, the executive director of the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights, a national watchdog group, told Insider.

Burghart said if more rioters made it inside the Capitol, or if Trump had walked with rioters to the building as he said he would, it would have been a "much more volatile situation."

"You could have literally had open air executions in Washington on January 6," he said. "It's clear from the rhetoric they were using inside the halls, their intentions, given things like a noose hanging out in front or the fact that they brought zip ties and weapons into the halls, it could have been disastrous."

Once expert says rioters never actually expected to gain access to the Capitol and were 'caught off guard and without a specific strategy'

At least 179 pro-Trump rioters have been charged in the Capitol insurrection so far.

Several of those arrested were found carrying weapons, including one man who was found with an arsenal of bombs and guns.

While the FBI says there's no "direct evidence" of a plot to kill at the Capitol, rioters were heard saying they wanted to execute Pence.

Javed Ali, a former senior director for counterterrorism and the National Security Council, questioned why the riot didn't turn more violent.

"Was it because they couldn't find members of Congress and the vice president? Was it because law enforcement thankfully prevented them from doing it? Was it because they had a change of heart at some point in the middle of their time in the building? I just don't think we know yet," Ali said.

"But it absolutely had the potential to be more violent and I'm surprised it wasn't, not only from that end of the spectrum, but from the law enforcement side, too."

Capitol riot
Protesters broke into Capitol Building on January 06, 2021.

Capitol Police have come under fire for their response to the insurrection. They were largely overwhelmed by rioters, and video showed some officers taking selfies with the insurrectionists and letting them through gates.

Tamara Herold, a crime scientist and director of the Crowd Management Research Council, told Insider that some rioters likely never believed they'd actually breach the capitol.

"I think most rioters were caught off-guard and without a specific strategy, which likely prevented greater harm from occurring," she said, adding that police actions may have saved lives: "Attempting to hold and redirect the crowd as long as possible to allow evacuation and the arrival of additional police personnel, without resorting to deadly violence (with one exception), likely prevented provoking rioters into using greater levels of deadly force."

Several military members and law enforcement officers were among rioters charged in the insurrection

Several former military members and retired or off-duty law-enforcement officers - people who are often taught how to use force for their careers - are among rioters who have been charged.

NPR reported that nearly one in five rioters charged were active duty or retired military veterans, and that police officers from across the nation participated in the insurrection.

Protesters enter the Senate Chamber on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. Pro-Trump protesters have entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations in the nation's capital.
Protesters enter the Senate Chamber on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. Pro-Trump protesters have entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations in the nation's capital.

Three members of the Oath Keepers, a far-right extremist group that recruits former military and police, have been charged with conspiracy in the insurrection, and a charging document showed men planning to storm the Capitol days in advance.

Burghart told Insider that he wasn't surprised to see former military members and off-duty police officers being arrested and put on leave in connection the insurrection.

"It certainly is worrisome in the current context that you have law enforcement officers who don't know the difference between right and wrong and willing to participate in a seditious act like trying to overthrow election results and engage in a bloody interaction," he said.

And while law enforcement agencies have said they had "no intelligence" that an insurrection would happen, there were warning signs that Trump's "Stop the Steal" rally would descend into violence.

Groups at the center of the riot had spoken about the insurrection online, and members of several well-known hate groups were identified as being at the riot.

Furthermore, the New York Police Department and FBI's Norfolk field office also sent Capitol Police and the FBI intelligence that violence was possible on January 6, including specific threats and plans, NPR and the Washington Post reported.

Protesters, including Larry Brock in back, enter the Senate Chamber on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. Pro-Trump protesters have entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations in the nation's capital.
Protesters, including Larry Brock in back, enter the Senate Chamber on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Congress held a joint session today to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. Pro-Trump protesters have entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations in the nation's capital.

Members of Congress want the insurrection investigated

The US House of Representatives opened an investigation into the insurrection, and lawmakers from both parties have stressed how serious the insurrection was.

Democratic Rep Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said she thought she was going to die during the riot in an hour-long Instagram live, while Republican Rep. John Katko told Syracuse.com that the insurrection was "much worse than people realized."

"There are a lot of unanswered questions here, from possible security lapses to who was involved and when they were involved," Katko told the publication. "We need to have a full stem to stern look back on this to see what happened, how it happened, the sequence of events, who contributed to it, and how we make sure it never happens again."

Seven Democratic senators are also calling for an ethics probe into Sens. Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley, and whether their actions to object to the election results contributed to the insurrection.

The Department of Justice, too, has started an internal review into the attack.

Qanon shaman viking riot capitol
Jake Angeli, the "Q Shaman," was one of several protesters to confront Capitol police officers at the US Capitol on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC. - Demonstrators breached security and entered the Capitol as Congress debated the a 2020 presidential election Electoral Vote Certification.

Ali told Insider that the Biden administration should take steps to prevent further insurrections from happening in the coming years.

He said there needs to be stricter domestic terrorism laws, as well as a commission on domestic terrorism, and said there need to more internal resources for government agencies to investigate and prevent such acts.

Herold told Insider that there should be a "thorough review" into what happened, and changes in leadership, policy, and training protocols "should be guided by the investigatory outcomes and thoughtful discussions with experts moving forward."

Burghart told Insider that the effort to shut down further possible insurrections lies not only in the hands of the Biden administration, but everyone.

"I think it requires concerted national efforts to de-radicalize these folks and to have them disengage and start getting back to all of us talking about who and what we are as a nation in the 21st Century, living up to our real core democratic values rather than allowing the kind of conspiracism and anti-democratic ideas to flourish," he said. "That's going to require a concerted effort by all Americans to change the tone and tenor of our nation moving forward."

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Biden appears to have removed the button Trump used to order Diet Cokes from the Oval Office desk

Biden in the Oval Office, left, and Trump in the Oval Office, right.
President Joe Biden in the Oval Office, left, and President Donald Trump in the Oval Office, right.
  • Biden moved a button Trump used to order Diet Coke to the Oval Office.
  • Trump said in 2017 that when he pressed a button on his desk, a White House butler would bring him soda.
  • The call button isn't new — Obama was pictured with it too — but it's no longer on the Resolute Desk.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A button President Donald Trump used to order Diet Cokes while sitting at the Resolute Desk in the White House has apparently been moved since President Joe Biden took office.

Trump first showed off the wooden call box in 2017 interviews with The Associated Press and the Financial Times. He showed reporters that with a push of a red button, a White House butler would bring him a glass of soda in the Oval Office.

In the years after, Trump was pictured regularly with the rectangular wooden box on the desk, right next to his phones.

The call button is not new and isn't used only for soda - President Barack Obama was once pictured with it on a table during a lunch with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Read more: I went inside the US Capitol's immense security bubble to cover the most surreal presidential inauguration of my lifetime. Here's what I saw.

obama and pelosi dine
President Barack Obama and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in the Oval Office dining room on October 22, 2009, with the call button visible on the table.

But Biden appears to have moved the call button off his desk.

Instead, photos of his desk on Biden's first day in office show two phones, a coffee cup, and a set of pens. It's unclear where the call button went.

Presidents almost always redesign the Oval Office upon taking office, and the call button wasn't the only thing Biden changed.

Biden replaced a portrait of President Andrew Jackson with a portrait of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and opted to feature a number of progressives and activists through the room, including Robert F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, Eleanor Roosevelt, and the labor leader and civil-rights activist Cesar Chavez.

He also chose to display portraits of Benjamin Franklin, President Thomas Jefferson, and Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton.

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The man accused of breaking the window Ashli Babbitt tried to climb through when she was shot during the Capitol insurrection has been arrested

US Capitol riot
Riots at the US Capitol Building.
  • Chad Barrett Jones, 42, of Coxs Creek, Kentucky, was arrested in Louisville on Saturday, the FBI said in a news release.
  • Jones is accused of breaking a window of the Capitol building moments before Ashli Babbitt was fatally shot during the insurrection earlier this month. 
  • He's facing multiple charges, including assault on a federal officer, destruction of government property, obstruction of justice, unlawful entry on restricted building or grounds, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A Kentucky man who is accused of breaking a window of the Capitol building moments before Ashli Babbitt was fatally shot during the insurrection earlier this month has been arrested.

Chad Barrett Jones, 42, of Coxs Creek, Kentucky, was arrested in Louisville on Saturday and charged with assault on a federal officer, destruction of government property, obstruction of justice, unlawful entry on restricted building or grounds, and violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds, the FBI said in a news release.

According to an FBI charging affidavit, Jones broke a window near the House Speaker's Lobby that Babbitt tried to climb through as she was fatally shot.

The affidavit cites video from the Washington Post, alleging that Jones can be seen striking a door to the lobby's glass panels with what appeared to be a wooden flag pole.

The crowd around the man can be heard shouting "Break it down" and "let's f------ go!" as he struck the glass, the FBI said.

Seconds after the glass panel was broken, Babbitt, 35, was shot by a police officer as she tried to climb through it to enter the lobby.

Babbitt and four others died in the Capitol riot, which was carried out by supporters of President Donald Trump who stormed the building as Congress debated Electoral College votes from the 2020 election won by President-elect Joe Biden.

FBI Special Agent Javier Gonzalez said in the affidavit that a witness identified Jones through a tip to the FBI National Threat Operation Center.

The witness said Jones was a relative who had told him he traveled to Washington DC and had used a flag pole holding a flag supporting Trump to break the Capitol window.

Another person, who identified himself as a friend of Jones, told the FBI that Jones had called him after seeing himself on the news, and called himself an idiot, according to the affidavit.

Jones is scheduled to appear in court on January 19.

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LA County has suspended air-quality regulations that limit the number of cremations as it handles a ‘backlog’ of bodies from the pandemic

In this Jan. 12, 2020 file photo, provided by the LA County Dept. of Medical Examiner-Coroner Elizabeth "Liz" Napoles, right, works alongside with National Guardsmen who are helping to process the COVID-19 deaths to be placed into temporary storage at LA County Medical Examiner-Coroner Office in Los Angeles.
In this Jan. 12, 2020 file photo, provided by the LA County Dept. of Medical Examiner-Coroner Elizabeth "Liz" Napoles, right, works alongside with National Guardsmen who are helping to process the COVID-19 deaths to be placed into temporary storage at LA County Medical Examiner-Coroner Office in Los Angeles.
  • The South Coast Air Quality Management District said in a news release on Sunday that it as lifting air-quality regulations that limit the number of cremations that can be performed in Los Angeles County.
  • The agency said the regulation was lifted to officials could handle a "backlog" of bodies of people who have died in LA County during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • The regulation has been lifted for 10 days, with the option to b extended. 
  • LA County is currently seeing a surge in COVID-19 cases and has reported 13,848 deaths from COVID-19 since the pandemic began.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Los Angeles County has temporarily lifted air-quality regulations that limit the number of cremations that can be performed monthly as officials handle a "backlog" of bodies of people who have died during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The South Coast Air Quality Management District said in a news release on Sunday that it was issuing an emergency order to lift the cremation limit put in place "based on potential air quality impacts" after requests from the Los Angeles County Medical-Examiner Coroner (ME-Coroner) and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.

According to an order issued by South Coast AQMD, which regulates air pollution in multiple counties across Southern California, as of January 15, there were more than 2,700 bodies being stored at hospitals in LA County and at the Coroner's office and officials didn't have the resources or capability to perform cremations under current regulations.

"The current rate of death is more than double that of pre-pandemic years, leading to hospitals, funeral homes, and crematoriums exceeding capacity without the ability to process the backlog of cases," the agency said, adding that any facility planning to exceed cremation limits should file an email notice citing capacity and temperature requirements.

Los Angeles County has reported 13,848 deaths from COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and more than 1 million cases overall.

Hospitals recently said they were running out of oxygen, while in December a coffin manufacturer said east LA was facing a wood shortage due to demand increase amid COVID-19 deaths.

The South Coast AQMD said the order lifting cremation regulations would last 10 days but may be extended as the county coroner "anticipates that another surge is approaching as a result of the New Year's holiday since deaths tend to occur 4-6 weeks after gatherings."

The agency said all other air-quality rule requirements would remain in effect during its lift on cremation restrictions.

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A member of Congress says she chose to risk running into Capitol rioters over sheltering with maskless colleagues during the insurrection

Del. Stacey Plaskett, D-V.I., attends a House Oversight and Reform Committee markup in Rayburn Building on a resolution on whether to hold Attorney General William Barr and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress on Wednesday, June 12, 2019.
Del. Stacey Plaskett, D-V.I., attends a House Oversight and Reform Committee markup in Rayburn Building on a resolution on whether to hold Attorney General William Barr and Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross in contempt of Congress on Wednesday, June 12, 2019.
  • Rep. Stacey Plaskett, who serves as a House delegate representing the Virgin Islands, told Buzzfeed News that she opted to shelter in her office instead of with colleagues during the Capitol insurrection last week. 
  • She said was concerned about several Republicans not wearing masks while sheltering in a secure room during the insurrection.
  • In the days since the insurrection, Democratic Reps. Pramila Jayapal, Bonnie Watson Coleman, Brad Schneider, and Adriano Espaillat have tested positive for COVID-19.
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Rep. Stacey Plaskett says she opted not to shelter with Republican colleagues who weren't wearing masks during the Capitol insurrection last week and instead chose to risk running into the mob as she sought safety elsewhere.

In an interview with Buzzfeed News, Plaskett, who serves as a House delegate representing the US Virgin Islands, said she was watching the debate over Electoral College votes remotely in her office as rioters who supported President Donald Trump stormed the Capitol building on January 6.

She and her staff locked their doors, and a few hours later she was told to join other members of Congress in a secure location.

Plaskett briefly went down to the room, but quickly realized several Republican lawmakers weren't wearing masks to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

"I became concerned that, you know, maybe I could fight off or run from rioters, but I wouldn't be able to see the virus as it was coming toward me," she told Buzzfeed. "I decided that I'd rather go through the tunnels and get back to my office and lock the door again."

Plaskett, a Democrat, isn't the only representative to raise concerns over Republicans in the House not wearing masks during the insurrection.

Rep. Susan Wild said last week that "about half" of the people in the sheltering room declined to wear masks, and several people were seen on video not taking up an officer from Rep. Lisa Blunt Rochester, who tried to pass out surgical masks.

In the days since the insurrection, Democratic Reps. Pramila Jayapal, Bonnie Watson Coleman, Brad Schneider, and Adriano Espaillat have tested positive for COVID-19.

Coleman wrote an opinion column in the Washington Post after testing positive for COVID-19, in which she criticized her "Republican colleagues' inability to accept facts."

"I am angry that after I spent months carefully isolating myself, a single chaotic day likely got me sick. I am angry that several of our nation's leaders were unwilling to deal with the small annoyance of a mask for a few hours," she wrote.

Schneider told NBC Chicago that he didn't know if he contracted COVID-19 in the Capitol building or elsewhere, but also criticized the actions of his colleagues.

"I know that my exposure in that room was greater than any other time through this entire pandemic," he said, later adding, "I can't blame any one person, but I can condemn the acts of those people, who refuse to put on their masks and just out of courtesy try to keep everyone around them safe or as safe as possible."

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