Archive for Grace Kay

Tesla’s appeal to car buyers is ‘clearly formidable’ but not rock solid, J.D. Power study finds

Electric car Charging
Using the portable Roadie charging system
  • As Tesla faces more competition, car buyers are considering alternatives, a J.D. Power study finds.
  • Traditional automakers and new startups are flooding the electric-car market in the US.
  • The J.D. Power report found many customers may still be on the fence about buying an EV.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Tesla's dominant role in the electric-vehicle market could eventually be overtaken by another company, according to a report from J.D. Power.

The study by the consumer-intelligence company on electric-car buying trends found that only a small percentage of electric-car shoppers plan to stay entirely loyal to Tesla.

"One could argue this indicates that, while Tesla's appeal is clearly formidable, it's not absolute and could be displaced by a worthy alternative," said Stewart Stropp, senior director of automotive retail, in J.D. Power's press release.

While Tesla was ranked among the top luxury car brands, only 4% of buyers who expressed interest in Tesla said that they would only consider purchasing a Tesla.

Survey respondents for the inaugural study that took place from December to January included 9,030 prospective buyers in the US planning to purchase or lease a car within the next year. 

Consumers' willingness to consider brands outside of Tesla demonstrates a fundamental shift in a US market that Tesla has fundamentally led. In 2020, Sandy Munro, a top car expert, said Tesla is a full decade ahead of its competitors.

At the same time, other automakers are flooding the EV space and Tesla is no longer the only EV option.

Electric-vehicle startups, including Lucid Motors, Rivian, and Fisker have attracted billions of dollars in investments, while traditional companies like General Motors and Ford have already begun to launch electric vehicles.

EMBARGO 2/14/2022 4PM ET 2022 Chevrolet BoltEV 002
The 2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV.

When looking outside of Tesla, customers said they might consider alternative brands for better performance, functionality, and purchase price. At about $35,000, Tesla's Model 3 is its cheapest car, but features a price tag that some car buyers might balk at. Elon Musk has said Tesla is aiming to have a $25,000 Tesla ready in "about three years." Chevrolet is readying a $33,995 EV, the 2022 Bolt, for a planned summer launch.

The J.D. Power study also found many customers are on the fence about buying any electric car at all. About 59% of surveyed new vehicle shoppers identified themselves as only somewhat likely or unlikely to buy an electric car.

"To avoid a potential ongoing inventory surplus, it behooves manufacturers and retailers to identify why shoppers in the middle ground aren't completely sold on the technology, and how to get them over the hump into the 'very likely' consideration camp," Stropp said in the release.

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Nyan Cat’ flying Pop-Tart meme sells for nearly $600,000 as one-of-a-kind crypto art

Nyan Cat
Nyan Cat
  • A crypto art rendition of the Nyan Cat meme sold for about $590,000 on Friday.
  • Crypto art represents a $100 million market and allows digital artists to monetize memes.
  • Investors have gambled on digital keepsakes like the Nyan Cat in the past.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

A one-of-a-kind digital rendition of the Nyan Cat meme from 2011 sold for about $590,000 in an online auction on Friday. 

Over the past few weeks, online sales of nonfungible tokens, more commonly known as NFTs, have taken off, as cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin boomed

NFT art products - which operate as a type of digital asset or token - have in some instances sold for over $3.5 million a piece, contributing to a crypto art market that is currently valued at over $100 million.

For Chris Torres, the creator of Nyan Cat, the NFT sale represented his first foray into crypto art.

"I'm very surprised with the success, but I think I'm most glad knowing that I've basically opened the door to a whole new meme economy in the crypto world," Torres told Nasdaq.

Torres remastered the original animated GIF for its 10-year anniversary and ran a 24-hour auction on the crypto art platform Foundation on Thursday. 

The platform itself had only just launched two weeks prior and allows artists like Torres to continue to profit off their work if a buyer resells the piece later on for further profit.

Bids for the Nyan Cat started at 3 Ether (ETH) or about $1,544.38 and closed at 300 ETH - about $590,000 at the time of the sale. 

The majority of crypto art platforms use Ethereum as means of payment. ETH is the second largest cryptocurrency by market value after Bitcoin.

The buyer was anonymous, appearing only as "oxy7eb2...3f6b" on Foundation's site. The account will likely be the sole owner of the digital meme, as Torres told The Verge he has no plans to sell additional copies of the image in the future.

Despite the sale, the existing Nyan Cat GIF and video will still be available for distribution online. The crypto art sale simply allows the buyer to operate as a collector of sorts - as the owner of a digital piece of art based on a popular meme.

The Nyan Cat meme originated on YouTube and quickly became an internet sensation. The video depicts an animated cartoon cat that has a Pop-Tart for a torso. The video follows the cat as it flies through space, leaving a rainbow trail. The sequence is set to Japanese pop music and currently has over 185 million views on YouTube.

 

For the sale, Torres remastered the Nyan Cat through minor touch-ups, including removing a star from the animated sequence, according to The Verge. 

Crypto art could allow creators to profit off memes

"The creator originally owns it, and then they can sell it and directly monetize and have recognition for their work," Torres told The Verge.

Nyan Cat is not the first crypto art to sell for a large sum of money. On Sunday, a group of 34 digital collectible pieces of art, called CryptoPunks, sold for over $1 million in ETH, according to CoinDesk. In December, the digital artist Beeple sold an NFT art collection for over $3.5 million. 

Investors have gambled on digital products like Nyan Cat in the past. In 2018, 1.5 million people put over $40 million into the digital equivalent of Beanie Babies, CryptoKitties. 

Torres, Foundation, and Ethereum.org did not respond in time to comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Nyan Cat’ flying Pop-Tart meme sells for nearly $600,000 as one-of-a-kind crypto art

Nyan Cat
Nyan Cat
  • A crypto art rendition of the Nyan Cat meme sold for about $590,000 on Friday.
  • Crypto art represents a $100 million market and allows digital artists to monetize memes.
  • Investors have gambled on digital keepsakes like the Nyan Cat in the past.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

A one-of-a-kind digital rendition of the Nyan Cat meme from 2011 sold for about $590,000 in an online auction on Friday. 

Over the past few weeks, online sales of nonfungible tokens, more commonly known as NFTs, have taken off, as cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin boomed

NFT art products - which operate as a type of digital asset or token - have in some instances sold for over $3.5 million a piece, contributing to a crypto art market that is currently valued at over $100 million.

For Chris Torres, the creator of Nyan Cat, the NFT sale represented his first foray into crypto art.

"I'm very surprised with the success, but I think I'm most glad knowing that I've basically opened the door to a whole new meme economy in the crypto world," Torres told Nasdaq.

Torres remastered the original animated GIF for its 10-year anniversary and ran a 24-hour auction on the crypto art platform Foundation on Thursday. 

The platform itself had only just launched two weeks prior and allows artists like Torres to continue to profit off their work if a buyer resells the piece later on for further profit.

Bids for the Nyan Cat started at 3 Ether (ETH) or about $1,544.38 and closed at 300 ETH - about $590,000 at the time of the sale. 

The majority of crypto art platforms use Ethereum as means of payment. ETH is the second largest cryptocurrency by market value after Bitcoin.

The buyer was anonymous, appearing only as "oxy7eb2...3f6b" on Foundation's site. The account will likely be the sole owner of the digital meme, as Torres told The Verge he has no plans to sell additional copies of the image in the future.

Despite the sale, the existing Nyan Cat GIF and video will still be available for distribution online. The crypto art sale simply allows the buyer to operate as a collector of sorts - as the owner of a digital piece of art based on a popular meme.

The Nyan Cat meme originated on YouTube and quickly became an internet sensation. The video depicts an animated cartoon cat that has a Pop-Tart for a torso. The video follows the cat as it flies through space, leaving a rainbow trail. The sequence is set to Japanese pop music and currently has over 185 million views on YouTube.

 

For the sale, Torres remastered the Nyan Cat through minor touch-ups, including removing a star from the animated sequence, according to The Verge. 

Crypto art could allow creators to profit off memes

"The creator originally owns it, and then they can sell it and directly monetize and have recognition for their work," Torres told The Verge.

Nyan Cat is not the first crypto art to sell for a large sum of money. On Sunday, a group of 34 digital collectible pieces of art, called CryptoPunks, sold for over $1 million in ETH, according to CoinDesk. In December, the digital artist Beeple sold an NFT art collection for over $3.5 million. 

Investors have gambled on digital products like Nyan Cat in the past. In 2018, 1.5 million people put over $40 million into the digital equivalent of Beanie Babies, CryptoKitties. 

Torres, Foundation, and Ethereum.org did not respond in time to comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Nyan Cat’ flying Pop-Tart meme sells for nearly $600,000 as one-of-a-kind crypto art

Nyan Cat
Nyan Cat
  • A crypto art rendition of the Nyan Cat meme sold for about $590,000 on Friday.
  • Crypto art represents a $100 million market and allows digital artists to monetize memes.
  • Investors have gambled on digital keepsakes like the Nyan Cat in the past.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

A one-of-a-kind digital rendition of the Nyan Cat meme from 2011 sold for about $590,000 in an online auction on Friday. 

Over the past few weeks, online sales of nonfungible tokens, more commonly known as NFTs, have taken off, as cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin boomed

NFT art products - which operate as a type of digital asset or token - have in some instances sold for over $3.5 million a piece, contributing to a crypto art market that is currently valued at over $100 million.

For Chris Torres, the creator of Nyan Cat, the NFT sale represented his first foray into crypto art.

"I'm very surprised with the success, but I think I'm most glad knowing that I've basically opened the door to a whole new meme economy in the crypto world," Torres told Nasdaq.

Torres remastered the original animated GIF for its 10-year anniversary and ran a 24-hour auction on the crypto art platform Foundation on Thursday. 

The platform itself had only just launched two weeks prior and allows artists like Torres to continue to profit off their work if a buyer resells the piece later on for further profit.

Bids for the Nyan Cat started at 3 Ether (ETH) or about $1,544.38 and closed at 300 ETH - about $590,000 at the time of the sale. 

The majority of crypto art platforms use Ethereum as means of payment. ETH is the second largest cryptocurrency by market value after Bitcoin.

The buyer was anonymous, appearing only as "oxy7eb2...3f6b" on Foundation's site. The account will likely be the sole owner of the digital meme, as Torres told The Verge he has no plans to sell additional copies of the image in the future.

Despite the sale, the existing Nyan Cat GIF and video will still be available for distribution online. The crypto art sale simply allows the buyer to operate as a collector of sorts - as the owner of a digital piece of art based on a popular meme.

The Nyan Cat meme originated on YouTube and quickly became an internet sensation. The video depicts an animated cartoon cat that has a Pop-Tart for a torso. The video follows the cat as it flies through space, leaving a rainbow trail. The sequence is set to Japanese pop music and currently has over 185 million views on YouTube.

 

For the sale, Torres remastered the Nyan Cat through minor touch-ups, including removing a star from the animated sequence, according to The Verge. 

Crypto art could allow creators to profit off memes

"The creator originally owns it, and then they can sell it and directly monetize and have recognition for their work," Torres told The Verge.

Nyan Cat is not the first crypto art to sell for a large sum of money. On Sunday, a group of 34 digital collectible pieces of art, called CryptoPunks, sold for over $1 million in ETH, according to CoinDesk. In December, the digital artist Beeple sold an NFT art collection for over $3.5 million. 

Investors have gambled on digital products like Nyan Cat in the past. In 2018, 1.5 million people put over $40 million into the digital equivalent of Beanie Babies, CryptoKitties. 

Torres, Foundation, and Ethereum.org did not respond in time to comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

These tech startups enable surgeons to train and supervise operations remotely during the pandemic

A surgeon navigates a ballistic fracture
A surgeon navigates a ballistic fracture using ImmersiveTouch.
  • Several start-ups have developed technology that allows surgeons to work remotely.
  • Augmented and virtual reality can help surgeons train and help operate remotely and in real time.
  • The pandemic has accelerated the need for AR and VR technology in the operating room.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

In 2015, Dr. Nadine Hachach-Haram helped perform her first remote live surgery on a bomb victim in Gaza from her home in London. She had no idea that just five years later her technology would be used to enable surgeons to self-isolate and work from home during a pandemic.

As COVID-19 continues to change the way people work, many frontline workers, especially surgeons, do not have the luxury of working from home. Traditionally, they are bound to hospitals, clinics or health care centers. 

But several startups have found a solution, allowing surgeons to work and train from home using technology for virtual and augmented reality. Hundreds of hospitals in the US have already begun to adopt the technology.

ImmersiveTouch, a start-up based out of Chicago, uses AR and VR technology to allow surgeons to practice procedures outside of the hospital using Oculus headsets and 3-D scans of patients. 

The company has seen its user base grow to almost three times its size in 2020, said ImmersiveTouch president Jay Banerjee. 

Read more: Kindred Capital backed VR design startup Gravity Sketch in a $3.7 million funding round after seeing this pitch deck

Banerjee said he expects more than half of the hospitals in the US will be using this technology within the next three years. A report from Allied Market Research finds the use of this technology in healthcare will account for a multi-billion dollar industry by 2026. 

"COVID-19 has really accelerated the adoption of remote training and remote collaboration," Banerjee told Insider. "That's really what's at the core of ImmersiveTouch." 

The pandemic has increased health disparities as it limits a surgeon's ability to travel

Hachach-Haram, a reconstructive surgeon, started her company, Proximie, to help address health disparities across the globe. Proximie connects experts with remote cases and allows them to walk other surgeons in the operating room through live procedures step-by-step using VR.

Over the past five years, Hachach-Haram has found widespread success with her technology and has even been honored by Queen Elizabeth II. In 2020, she saw the company grow at a new record pace, spanning six times as many hospitals as the previous year.

"The challenge of connecting experts before COVID-19 was difficult enough, but during the pandemic it was nearly impossible for many hospitals," Hachach-Haram told Insider. "It became apparent that the technology that was needed in more remote parts of the world was the same technology that was needed now everywhere"

Proximie and ImmersiveTouch's technology has been used in thousands of procedures and adopted by hundreds of hospitals. 

Hachach-Haram has created partnerships with hospitals in over 35 countries, including UMass Memorial Health Care and Mass General Hospital in Boston. She said the platform is used to perform about 800 surgeries per month around the world.

In 2019, Proximie was awarded a multi-year contract with the UK Ministry of Defence to provide the service to Royal Navy ships. At the onset of the pandemic, National Health Service hospitals in the UK adopted the technology as a way to allow self-isolating surgeons to connect with frontline workers. 

ImmersiveTouch's technology has also been implemented at many leading hospitals, including John Hopkins, University of Chicago and University of Texas hospitals.  This year alone, the company has been asked to install the software in about 150 more hospitals.

ImmersiveTouch, Proximie use the same technology found in many gaming systems

The technology behind ImmersiveTouch and Proximie is similar to that of gaming systems and popular apps like Snapchat's filters or Pokemon Go.

Banerjee said ImmersiveTouch was built in 2005 off the same computer graphics that created the Death Star from "Star Wars."

Today, ImmersiveTouch uses Facebook's Oculus Quest and Rift headsets, alongside the company's software which generates 3-D replicas of patient scans and allows surgeons to practice on the scans prior to performing surgery. The company is also looking to capitalize on its name and is working towards incorporating robotic haptic feedback that could simulate the feeling of working on human tissue.

A large part of a surgeon's job is training and Banerjee said his company's technology allows for ease of training and collaboration from home. 

With Proximie's  technology, the remote surgeon uses cameras at the operating site and the digital interface to guide the surgeon in the operating room through the procedure. When Hachach-Haram helped perform her first live surgery on Fadel, the 18-year-old bomb victim from Gaza, she guided a local trauma surgeon through the operation using the VR setup to visually demonstrate the process without ever having met the patient .

"It's like having a coach in the wings working with you," Hachach-Haram said regarding remote guiance through Proximie.

Saving money while staying safe

The software also saves the hospitals money.

This year, many hospitals have opted to hold remote training events using ImmersiveTouch's virtual cadavers. Surgeons are typically required to travel to training events every year, but the technology allows these events to take place remotely, without the cost of plane tickets, hotels, fancy dinners, or cadavers.

While ImmersiveTouch users can easily buy VR headsets themselves, Hachach-Haram has focused on making her technology as simple as possible to provide a lower-cost barrier of entry for surgeons in developing countries. The only requirement for Proximie is a Wi-Fi connection. The program allows surgeons a 360-view of the operation in real time directly on their computer screen via Proximie's website.

See also: Russian billionaire and former Brooklyn Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov is quietly backing a virtual reality startup trying to rival Facebook with a multiplayer world

Proximie and ImmersiveTouch are not the only start-ups working to bring AR and VR technology to the operating room. Several other companies have developed technology that will allow for remote training and collaboration, including Sentiar, a start-up that uses a holographic overlay of a patient's scans to allow surgeons to see the anatomy in its entirety as they operate. Other companies, like Osso VR and Surgical Theater, focus on using the technology for training and pre-op planning.

Despite the widespread interest in using AR and VR technology in the operating room, the technology still faces several hurdles, including doubt regarding the technology's reliability as well as the accessibility of the hardware that could be expensive or difficult to purchase in more remote areas of the world.

One of the biggest challenges for Proximie's team has been convincing surgeons to trust and use the product - a process that has been accelerated by COVID-19 travel restrictions. The widespread travel bans have forced more health centers to consider remote options like Proximie or ImmersiveTouch.

"Proximie disrupts the centuries old way of performing surgery, so I knew I had to be careful," Hachach-Haram said in a statement. "I have made it clear that Proximie is simply a helpful addition to the process and that we will always need surgeons and human-patient interaction."

Read the original article on Business Insider

The history of Dogecoin, the cryptocurrency that surged after Elon Musk tweeted about it but started as a joke on Reddit years ago

Dogecoin icon on the phone
Dogecoin
  • Dogecoin rose to a record high on Monday, becoming one of the top 10 cryptocurrencies by market value.
  • Tweets from Elon Musk and Snoop Dogg about the coin helped drive the surge.
  • In 2013, Dogecoin started as a joke between two engineers, but gained popularity quickly.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The digital currency based on a meme - Dogecoin - has continued to capture public attention as Tesla CEO Elon Musk and rapper Snoop Dogg sent out a flurry of tweets over the weekend, driving up the price of the meme-currency.

Following the series of tweets, Dogecoin leaped 31% on Monday to a record high value of $0.083745. The digital currency now ranks as one of the top 10 digital coins by market value, according to CoinMarketCap.

Musk tweeted out an instructional YouTube video on Dogecoin on Sunday, while Snoop Dogg uploaded a picture of the dog that inspired Dogecoin with the caption "@elonmusk."

Musk has been actively tweeting about the currency since its copycat rally to GameStop. In January, Dogecoin surged over 600% , driven by the Reddit mania surrounding GameStop.

Dogecoin's recent popularity is not the first time the unusual digital currency has captured the spotlight. 

Dogecoin started in 2013 as a joke between two engineers. IBM software engineer Billy Markus and Adobe software engineer Jackson Palmer had never even met when they successfully combined two of 2013's greatest phenomena: Bitcoin, and "doge." The result: Dogecoin. 

Dogecoin was a product that people started using as soon as it was released, much to the two engineers' surprise. Over a million unique visitors went to dogecoin.com within the website's first month.

The doge meme that gained popularity in 2013 featured an image of a Shiba Inu dog with Comic Sans thought bubbles spouting out of it with near monosyllabic ideas. The meme could be used to express anything from jokes about naps, early mornings, diets -- even space exploration. 

doge
 

Before the product was released, Palmer, who'd been following developments in the cryptocurrency world, absentmindedly tweeted, "Investing in Dogecoin, pretty sure it's the next big thing."

Read more: 4 heavyweight investing firms answer the 5 most burning bitcoin questions facing investors as the cryptocurrency sees unprecedented volatility

He got some replies encouraging him to pursue the idea, and a week later bought the domain Dogecoin.com. Inevitably, the idea got picked up on reddit, a hotbed of doge activity in 2013. 

Meanwhile, in Portland, Billy Markus had been trying to program his own digital currency that would appeal to a broader demographic than the profiteers who've flooded into Bitcoin since the currency was released in 2008. But the project had gone nowhere. Then he stumbled across Dogecoin.com within a day or two of the site going live.

"The first thing I said was, 'This is so funny.' Then I said, 'I should just make this coin,'" Markus told Insider back in 2013.

Markus tweeted at Palmer saying he wanted to go in on the venture, and before Palmer even responded, started reconfiguring Bitcoin's source code, which was publicly available, to turn its user-facing elements into the doge meme.

Eventually Palmer wrote back, and the partnership was formed. A little more than a week after Palmer's joke tweet, Dogecoin was launched in December of 2013.

The currency was derived from the open source software project, Litecoin. Unlike Bitcoin. Dogecoin does not have a limit to the number of coins that can be produced in the system.

Redditors helped Dogecoin develop its own subculture in 2013

The digital currency instantly exploded on Reddit, generating a market value of $8 million at the time. It became popular for the internet practice of "tipping," which was a way of repaying people on the web for performing "good deeds," like sharing an idea or making a platform more accessible.

Only about a week after launching, Dogecoin became the second-most-tipped currency, the engineers told Insider.

The digital currency has long contributed to a culture that distinguishes itself by a sort of irreverence for institutions like Wall Street. It's not surprising Reddit users would take up the stock alongside GameStop and AMC in trading against big hedge funds.

Dogecoin developed its own culture of sorts in 2013, largely due to the currency having a lower barrier of entry than Bitcoin for people who might be interested in cryptocurrencies.

See also: Some GameStop store employees are getting investing questions and criticism from customers over the company's volatile stock and they're in the dark about how to handle it

"It's not taking itself as seriously, it's not being used by people  worrying about whether they'll become rich," Palmer told Insider in 2013. "It's something to share for thanks or kudos."

At the time, the engineers said they had no plans to compete with cryptocurrency giant Bitcoin, but in 2014 the trading volume of the meme-worthy coin briefly eclipsed Bitcoin and all other digital currencies. 

A year later, Palmer took an "extended leave of absence" from the company as he said the cryptocurrency environment had grown increasingly serious and "toxic." 

In 2017, the currency crossed a new milestone - $2 billion market value

Redditors focus on Dogecoin once again

The digital coin's rally, much like GameStop's rally that was in part driven by Reddit users from WallStreetBets, has been fueled by the subreddit SatoshiStreetBets, where users planned to send the currency "to the moon" - or at least to their goal of $1 per coin.

Dogecoin saw similar efforts in July when an unsuccessful TikTok trend called for forcing the coin to equal a US dollar. Redditors have a long way to go before the coin's price is equivalent to a dollar; since Dogecoin jumped Friday the coin is currently worth about $0.0779.

After Dogecoin stocks surged with other volatile stocks like GameStop and AMC, Robinhood temporarily restricted crypto trading, as Bitcoin rose with Dogecoin.

Musk also tweeted about the currency in January using a mock Vogue cover, dubbed "Dogue."

Rob Wile contributed earlier reporting to this article.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Here are the 10 Super Bowl commercials that have generated the most buzz online

super bowl lv
  • iSpot provided data on the top Super Bowl commercials trending on social media.
  • Some brands that have advertised in the past are sitting this year out. 
  • Top ads on the list found success by focusing on nostalgia and making the planet a better place.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Even Super Bowl commercials look different this year.

The Super Bowl venue in Tampa, Florida, will be at a fraction of its normal capacity on Sunday -- and that's not the only difference because of the coronavirus pandemic. Even the commercial lineup will look and feel a bit different for those watching the game at home, ad-tracking company Amobee told Insider.

Some brands -- like Budweiser, who is skipping the Super Bowl for the first time in nearly 40 years - have decided to forego the game this year. Other companies, like Chipotle and DoorDash, have launched Super Bowl advertising campaigns for the first time.  

Interest in Super Bowl related content is down 10% from last year, according to Amobee analysts.  

"Recent interest in Super Bowl party-related content has barely risen above where it was throughout 2020, confirming that the much-loved American tradition of Super Bowl parties will be forfeited to maintain social distancing," Amobee brand analyst Avalon Harder told Insider.

Despite the changes, some Super Bowl ads have already begun to pick up steam online. TV ad measurement company, iSpot tracked engagement around the digital content put out by brands ahead of the Super Bowl and compiled a list of the top 10 brands getting the most buzz on social media. 

Many of the commercials that have been trending on the internet focus on nostalgia, whether for old songs, NFL players, or 90's movies. Other brands captured people's attention with their focus on social responsibility, as companies like General Motors and Chipotle look to increase sustainability.

Here are some of the brands that have been creating the most buzz, according to iSpot's data.

10. Cheetos

The Cheetos commercial packs a punch.

The snack company released three Super Bowl teasers for their Crunch Pop Mix ahead of the big game. The saga follows actor Ashton Kutcher as he investigates the case of the missing Cheetos.

Kutcher searches the house for clues regarding the missing snack, while a revamped version of Shaggy 's hit song from the early 2000's, "It Wasn't Me" plays in the background.

The video ends with Kutcher's wife, Mila Kunis, telling her husband Shaggy's catchphrase - "It wasn't me," when he confronts her about the snack.

9.  Jimmy John's

Jimmy John's ad takes on a mob theme.

The commercial features actor Brad Garrett as Tony Bologavich, a type of sandwhich mob boss, who calls himself the "King of Cold Cuts."

The mob boss takes on the sandwhich giant with stale bread and cold cuts made out of a science laboratory.

8. Doritos

The Doritos ad is star studded.

The commercial features, Hollywood heavy-hitters including Matthew McConaughey, Mindy Kaling, and Jimmy Kimmel.

The advertisement shows Matthew McConaughey as a two-dimensional character, struggling to lead his life until he eats the company's 3D Crunch Chili Cheese Nachos.

Doritos has long been known for their Super Bowl commercials. The snack company, owned by Frito Lay, has been a part of game day for nearly 15 years.

7. General Motors

GM's new commercial focuses on their move toward electric vehicles.

The ad features Will Ferrell, Kenan Thompson, and Awkwafina. It follows Ferrell's antics as he decides to go after Norway for beating the US in electric vehicle sales.

The Super Bowl ad is just one of many steps that GM has taken to indicate how serious the company is about pursuing electric cars. In January, the company changed its brand logo to highlight their EV future.

6. Doritos

The snack company's 18-second teaser shows Mindy Kaling on Jimmy Kimmel's "Our Next Guest is." 

The ad cuts off with #FlatMatthew. The hashtag is a reference to Doritos other commercial that depicts McConaughey in 2-D.

5. Frito Lay

The snack company's nearly two minute commercial is jam-packed with NFL legends.

The ad "Twas the Night Before Super Bowl," has football player, Marshawn Lynch narrating the night before the Big Game.

The video shows numerous Super Bowl legends preparing to watch, including Eli and Peyton Manning, as well as Joe Montana, and Deion Sanders.

4. Uber Eats

Uber Eats focuses on nostalgia and is one of the only commercials on the list to touch on the impact of 2020.

The Uber Eats ad stars Wayne and Garth from the 90's hit "Wayne's World." The two characters reflect on the difficulties of 2020.

The video is the first in a series for Uber Eats featuring the two characters.

"High interest in the appearance of Wayne and Garth from Wayne's World in Uber Eats' upcoming ad further indicates that audiences are especially in need of the familiar and nostalgic during a period of uncertainty in America," Harder told Insider.

3. Cheetos

Cheetos' top commercial focuses on Mila Kunis.

The ad sets up the longer commercial. Kunis gets advice from Shaggy, who tells her to "Just stick to the line I gave you."

 

2. Chipotle

In its first Super Bowl advertisement the company takes on a lofty goal. 

The little boy who stars in the commercial asks, "Can a Burrito Change the World?"

Chipotle launched the ad as a part of a bigger initiative aiming to focus on sustainable food sources and supporting young farmers.

1. Amazon

Amazon's commercial turns its own practices on its head - challenging the stereotype that makes most virtual assistants use a feminine voice and persona.

The advertisement "Alexa's Body," features Michael B. Jordan in the parody of female personal assistant's like Alexa and Siri.

Jordan embodies Alexa's persona in the commercial, showing how the Amazon assistant can do anything from read books outloud to add items to a shopping list.

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Jordan shared the Super Bowl ad on social media Wednesday and the video has taken off since then.

 

Read the original article on Business Insider

The Vermont teacher who made Bernie Sanders’ inauguration mittens plans to mass produce them

bernie sanders inauguration meme
Bernie Sanders is making money for charity thanks to his virtual inauguration meme.
  • The teacher who made Sander's mittens, Jen Ellis, is partnering with Vermont Teddy Bear Company to mass produce the viral mittens.
  • A portion of the profit from the mitten sales will go to Make a Wish Vermont.
  • Merchandise from Sanders' inauguration outfit has sold out across the board.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The Vermont teacher known for giving Bernie Sander his inauguration mittens, Jen Ellis, announced Monday she is planning to create an entire mitten line through a partnership with Vermont Teddy Bear Company.

Jen Ellis has struggled to meet demand since her mittens helped spawn a meme that has taken over the internet. Last week, the now-iconic mittens worn by Sanders sold out.

Over the weekend, Ellis announced on Twitter that the mittens will be available to everyone, as the teddy-bear maker will help her mass produce the product.

Ellis originally made the mittens for Sanders as a gift. They were crafted by hand and made from recycled sweaters. 

 

Read more: We tracked down the political diaspora of 2020 Democratic presidential candidates and 25 of their key staffers to see what they are up to now

Ellis did not comment on when the mittens would be available for sale or share more details on their production, though the teddy-bear maker told ABC News they would be working closely with Ellis.

It will represent the company's first attempt at producing mittens. 

"Jen is going to work hand-in-hand - mitten-in-hand - with each one of our designers," the company's vice president of product innovation, Hayes McCarthy, told ABC News. "We're excited to be in the mittens category."

A portion of the profits from the mitten sales will be donated to Make a Wish Vermont. Vermont Teddy Bear Company has contributed to the foundation in the past. The company, which crafts handmade teddy bears, also has one of Sanders himself. 

See also: These 32 progressive power players are ready to push for big changes in the Biden administration

Products related to Sander's inauguration outfit and meme have spurred sales across the board.

Sanders' Burton jacket sold out days after the inauguration as social media channels were inundated with images of Sanders in the jacket.

Sanders himself has also turned the meme into an opportunity to benefit charity. He has raised $1.8 million for Vermont's Meals on Wheels by selling merchandise with the meme on it through his campaign store website. 

His first product, a $45 sweatshirt, sold out in under 30 minutes. Additional merchandise was added and sold out days later on the site.

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The Vermont teacher who made Bernie Sanders’ inauguration mittens plans to mass produce them

bernie sanders inauguration meme
Bernie Sanders is making money for charity thanks to his virtual inauguration meme.
  • The teacher who made Sander's mittens, Jen Ellis, is partnering with Vermont Teddy Bear Company to mass produce the viral mittens.
  • A portion of the profit from the mitten sales will go to Make a Wish Vermont.
  • Merchandise from Sanders' inauguration outfit has sold out across the board.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The Vermont teacher known for giving Bernie Sander his inauguration mittens, Jen Ellis, announced Monday she is planning to create an entire mitten line through a partnership with Vermont Teddy Bear Company.

Jen Ellis has struggled to meet demand since her mittens helped spawn a meme that has taken over the internet. Last week, the now-iconic mittens worn by Sanders sold out.

Over the weekend, Ellis announced on Twitter that the mittens will be available to everyone, as the teddy-bear maker will help her mass produce the product.

Ellis originally made the mittens for Sanders as a gift. They were crafted by hand and made from recycled sweaters. 

 

Read more: We tracked down the political diaspora of 2020 Democratic presidential candidates and 25 of their key staffers to see what they are up to now

Ellis did not comment on when the mittens would be available for sale or share more details on their production, though the teddy-bear maker told ABC News they would be working closely with Ellis.

It will represent the company's first attempt at producing mittens. 

"Jen is going to work hand-in-hand - mitten-in-hand - with each one of our designers," the company's vice president of product innovation, Hayes McCarthy, told ABC News. "We're excited to be in the mittens category."

A portion of the profits from the mitten sales will be donated to Make a Wish Vermont. Vermont Teddy Bear Company has contributed to the foundation in the past. The company, which crafts handmade teddy bears, also has one of Sanders himself. 

See also: These 32 progressive power players are ready to push for big changes in the Biden administration

Products related to Sander's inauguration outfit and meme have spurred sales across the board.

Sanders' Burton jacket sold out days after the inauguration as social media channels were inundated with images of Sanders in the jacket.

Sanders himself has also turned the meme into an opportunity to benefit charity. He has raised $1.8 million for Vermont's Meals on Wheels by selling merchandise with the meme on it through his campaign store website. 

His first product, a $45 sweatshirt, sold out in under 30 minutes. Additional merchandise was added and sold out days later on the site.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Invite-only chat app Clubhouse, which Elon Musk used over the weekend, says it plans to open its doors to everyone as soon as possible

Paul Davison
  • Clubhouse's CEO said the currently invite-only platform will open to all users as soon as possible.
  • Clubhouse operates as a real time, audio-only application which allows users to go into individual "rooms" and have open conversations.
  • The site has generated headlines after hosting conversations with public figures like Oprah Winfrey and Elon Musk.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Clubhouse CEO Paul Davison told CNBC on Monday that he plans to open the currently invite-only application - known for hosting celebrities and Silicon Valley leaders - to all users when it launches.

 "We're working to open up to everyone as fast as we can" Davison said in an appearance on CNBC's "Squawk Box."

Davison said he wants to make sure they "get the product right" before releasing it to the public, making sure the platform is the best it can be for facilitating constructive conversations and eliminating the pitfalls of other social-media applications.

Clubhouse operates as a real time, audio-only application which allows users to go into individual "rooms" and discuss anything from politics, to social justice to pop culture.

Read more: I caved and tried Clubhouse, a 10-month-old startup with a $1 billion valuation. I'm not sure I'll use it, but at least now I get what all the fuss is about.

Davison says the app is designed to foster real communication during a time when other social media networks like Twitter and Facebook have become increasingly toxic.

"The focus is on authentic human connection and dialogue, rather than likes or follows, and it's all using your voice," Davison said.

Other social-media networks like Parler have had difficulty monitoring conversations, and platforms like Facebook and Twitter have been forced to increase moderating efforts, even suspending former President Donald Trump from their sites.

Davison plans to moderate conversations in real time, but the app has had trouble with moderation in the past. Users have reported misinformation on vaccination, as well as hate speech. During Yom Kippur, the holiest day of the year for Judaism, users reported a chatroom that turned into a string of anti-Semitic hate speech.

See also: The unofficial story of how Clubhouse founders Paul Davison and Rohan Seth failed their way to a $1 billion app

Clubhouse has strict guidelines on hate speech and harassment, according to Davison. The site has moderators that are equipped to step in on difficult conversations and allows users to report conversations that violate the site's policies.

"Any social network needs to make moderation a top priority," Davison said.  "We have very strict guidelines in place that explicitly tell you what's not okay."

 He says the social media network centers on the importance of free speech and dialogue.

"We believe in the power of voice," Davison said. "The fact that anyone can go there without a following, without an audience and create conversations like that, that's what gets us excited."

The company also plans to allow users to make money directly from the site through subscriptions, ticketed events, and tipping.

The social-media application has gained public attention over the past year for hosting public figures like Oprah Winfrey and Jared Leto, as well as many Silicon Valley leaders. Clubhouse has over a $1 billion valuation even though it has yet to post any revenue and was founded less than a year ago.

On Sunday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk conducted an interview with Robinhood CEO Vlad Tenev, questioning the CEO regarding his decision to limit the trading of more volatile stocks like GameStop and AMC on the app.

 

Read the original article on Business Insider