Archive for Emily Walsh

Intel CEO reveals how he plans to rebuild the struggling chip industry by creating ‘the largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet’ here on US soil

Intel CEO Patrick Gelsinger (R) speaks alongside U.S. President Joe Biden during an event on the ongoing supply chain problems in the South Court Auditorium of the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on January 21, 2022 in Washington, DC
Intel CEO Patrick Gelsinger speaks alongside U.S. President Joe Biden during an event on the ongoing supply chain problems on January 21, 2022 in Washington, DC.
  • Intel CEO Patrick Gelsinger plans on making the world's largest semiconductor manufacturing plant in Ohio.
  • Gelsinger spoke with TIME about Intel's plans to move the semiconductor chip supply chain to Ohio by 2025.
  • Intel's $20 billion and 1,000-acre plant will be the "largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet," according to Gelsinger.

Intel CEO Patrick Gelsinger believes the best solution for the global chip shortage is building the world's largest semiconductor manufacturing plant right here on US soil. 

In an interview with Time, Gelsinger said his aim in developing Intel's forthcoming $20 billion mega-factory in New Albany, Ohio — which was announced earlier this week at a news conference with President Joe Biden — is to rebuild "a complete supply chain" for semiconductors in the US. 

 "When we look to 2030 and beyond, we could be at a dramatically different view of our national supply chains," Gelsinger told Time. "And, as we've said, COVID has induced us to think about these things differently."

The plant, which is slated to be operational in 2025, will include two semiconductor fabrication plants where Intel will research, develop, and manufacture computer chips. The effort is expected to employ approximately 3,000 people to produce the chips, which power everything from cars to gadgets like iPhones, gaming consoles, and computers.

Companies like Intel had been plagued by supply chain shortages and constraints around chips even before the pandemic, though factory shutdowns and increased demand exacerbated the problem. 

According to Gelsinger, the best way to alleviate the crunch is to bring the supply chain stateside. The CEO told Time that Intel plans to implement its most cutting-edge technology at the plant, adding that the plant could expand up to 2,000 acres.

"Our expectation is that this becomes the largest silicon manufacturing location on the planet," Gelsinger said. 

Although Ohio may seem like an unexpected choice for Intel, given its main hubs are primarily located on the West Coast, Gelsinger told TIME that Intel's move to the Midwest is strategic as the region attempts a comeback in manufacturing.

"Ohio has a great reputation as a manufacturing site," Gelsinger said. "For other industries, it's been well leveraged in that regard — manufacturing is hard work. It is just very disciplined execution."

Intel's announcement is the largest private-sector investment in Ohio history, according to the magazine. Gelsinger has repeatedly met with various leaders in Washington, DC, to discuss moving semiconductor manufacturing to the US in order to alleviate supply chain bottlenecks as part of the CHIPS for America Act.

Passed last year, the CHIPS Act authorized federal investments in chip manufacturing to incentivize chip makers in the US. However, the CHIPS act does not provide funding for the incentives. While the Senate passed $52 billion in funding in June, the House has not passed the legislation.

"[The CHIPS Act] allows us to go bigger and faster, but we're not waiting on its passage to get underway," Gelsinger told Time. "We're running a company. We're not running a political process. We're getting going."

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Kohl’s reportedly receives $9 billion bid from hedge fund Starboard Value Group as Wall Street pressures the retailer to make major changes or sell

kohl's
  • A Wall Street consortium offered approximately $9 billion to purchase department store chain Kohl's.
  • Kohl's faces pressure from activist investors to sell or make significant changes to the company.
  • The company had largely been able to avoid the retail apocalypse, but saw slumping sales during the pandemic. 

Acacia Research Corp. — a consortium backed by the hedge fund Starboard Value Group — placed an offer on Friday to purchase Kohl's for approximately $9 billion, the Wall Street Journal reported

The consortium offered to buy the department store chain for $64 a share on Friday, sources told the Wall Street Journal's Cara Lombardo. Although it is unknown if Kohl's will accept the offer, bankers assured Acacia that the consortium would receive the funding needed for the buy. 

The possible deal comes following a Reuters report earlier this week that found the retailer was in talks with Acacia about a bid. Although Acacia has a market value of $215 million, the group told Kohl's it received a "highly confident" letter from a bank stating it will be able to attain a debt-financing package for a portion of the bid, sources told the Journal.

Starboard and Kohl's did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment on the deal.

In recent weeks, Wall Street activist investors have put pressure on Kohl's to sell or make stark changes to the company, according to previous reporting by Insider

In a public letter to shareholders on Tuesday, activist investor Macellum Advisors – which owns a 5% stake in Kohl's – accused the retailer's executive team and board of directors of mismanagement and asked the company to make substantial changes or else sell the business.

"We firmly believe that without significantly more change to the Board, the Company will fail to deliver acceptable value creation in the years to come," the letter stated. "Absent more Board change, we believe the Board must pursue strategic alternatives."

While the company had largely been able to avoid the demise of peers like JCPenney and Sears that were particularly hard hit by the retail apocalypse, Kohl's performance began to falter during the pandemic.

"In our view, the business is falling short of its potential," GlobalData managing director Neil Saunders wrote in a note to clients in August.

Kohl's plans to share an updated financial plan and capital allocation strategy to improve its long-term profitability at the company's forthcoming "Investor Day" at the beginning of March. 

 

 

 

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A massive asteroid the size of the Empire State Building is about to pass Earth. Here’s how to track it.

A screenshot of NASA's Eyes on Asteroids which lets you track the asteroid as it passes by Earth.
A screenshot of NASA's Eyes website which lets you track asteroids as they pass by Earth.
  • An asteroid the size of the Empire State Building is expected to fly past Earth next week. 
  • NASA has classified the huge space rock as "potentially hazardous." 
  • The asteroid will stay 1.2 million miles away from Earth and can be tracked online.

A massive asteroid is heading towards Earth.

But don't worry, the asteroid won't hit the planet like in the Netflix movie "Don't Look Up." In fact, it will travel approximately 1.2 million miles away from Earth-- that's over five times the distance between the Earth and the moon-- and is expected to pass by on Tuesday.

Asteroid 7482 (1994 PC1), is a little over a half-mile wide, around the size of the Empire State Building, and has been tracked by NASA scientists since it was discovered by astronomer RH McNaught in 1994. The asteroid is one of several large asteroids to pass by Earth in recent weeks

"Near-Earth asteroid 1994 PC1 is very well known and has been studied for decades by our planetary defense experts," NASA posted to Twitter on Wednesday. "Rest assured, 1994 PC1 will safely fly past our planet."

1994 PC1 is considered "potentially hazardous" by NASA because it crosses Earth's orbit, according to USA TODAY.

The asteroid would cause a "complete catastrophe" if it were to hit the Earth because it has more energy than a nuclear blast, Franck Marchis, the Chief Scientific Officer at Unistellar and Senior Planetary Astronomer at the SETI Institute, explained to USA TODAY. Although 1994 PC1 sounds dangerous, there is no need to be concerned.

To watch 1994 PC1 pass by Earth, anyone with a backyard telescope of about 6 inches or wider in diameter and an app to help watch the sky should be able to see the asteroid pass at about 43,754 miles per hour, according to CNET.

For those without a telescope, NASA's Eyes website will also offer a visual and a count down to help track the passing of the asteroid. The Virtual Telescope Project will also offer a live stream of the asteroid passing by.

1994 PC1 orbits the sun every 1.5 years, according to NASA. The asteroid won't come this close to Earth again until 2105.

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John Deere gets close to self-farming farms with autonomous tractors coming later this year

A John Deere Tractor in a field.
  • John Deere recently unveiled its new autonomous tractor that's ready for large-scale production.
  • The tractors will be able to operate without a driver vis mobile device.
  • While the farming industry has lost workers over the years, some farmers are debating if this technology is necessary.

Self-driving tractors are coming to plow a field near you.

Acruculrual manufacturer John Deere unveiled its new autonomous tractor that's ready for large-scale production at a press conference last week. The company hopes to have the tractors available for sale sometime later in the year.

Farming with these self-driving tractors will look a little different and John Deere hopes the new machinery will help fill the gap between the world's growing population and the dwindling number of workers on farms.

"The global population is expected to grow from about 8 billion to nearly 10 billion people by 2050, increasing the global food demand by 50%," according to a press release from John Deere. "Furthermore, farmers must feed this growing population with less available land and skilled labor, and work through the variables inherent in farming like changing weather conditions and climate, variations in soil quality and the presence of weeds and pests."

The tractor combines technology already in John Deere tractors like GPS navigation, horsepower, and plows with newer innovations that allow it to be autonomous. All that farmers need to do to operate the equipment is set in their field and use their mobile device to start the tractor, according to John Deere. While the machine is on, the farmer can then leave the field.

From their mobile device, farmers will be able to monitor the tractor and see things such as live video, images, data, and metrics that will allow the farmer to make any adjustments as needed.

Although this may seem like a big step for farmers, John Deere has been automating much of its equipment for nearly two decades. Much of the company's machinery today has an auto-steer system that uses GPS to locate and guide tractors. While these tractors still need a driver to correct and missteps and watch the direction of the plow, a lot has been taken off of farmers' hands. This new tractor is just taking these existing technologies to the next level.

"This is not a demo. It's not a concept machine. It's something we've had in the field with farmers for years and will be taking to production in fall," Deanna Kovar, vice president of production and precision ag production systems at John Deere, said to The Verge

For certain tractor models, farmers can expect to spend over $600,000. While John Deere is selling the automation system separately so it can be downloaded into tractors they already own, some farmers are still worried about the costs.

Many farmers say they can't even repair their John Deere tractors on their own, they have to find a John Deere authorized repair shop to do the work for them which can be expensive. The company even has the availability to remotely shut down many of its tractors using cloud technology if a farmer has modified their equipment or has missed a lease payment on their machine.

"I'm all for innovation, and I think John Deere is a helluva company, but they're trying to be the Facebook of farming," Kevin Kenney, an agricultural engineer who believes farmers have the right to repair their own equipment, told Wired.

While self-driving machinery could help farmers save money in the long term by limiting the number of workers they need on their farms, the necessity of the involvement of artificial intelligence in farming is still debated amongst farmers. 

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Walmart, Kroger, and Albertsons recall over 28,000 pounds of ground beef over possible E. coli contamination

Ground beef for sale at Walmart.
Ground beef for sale at Walmart.
  • More than 28,000 pounds of ground beef is being recalled after possible E. coli contamination. 
  • Customers who purchased ground beef from Kroger, Walmart, Albertsons, and WinCo Foods in several states are encouraged to check their products.
  • E. coli infection can cause severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting, according to the CDC.

Retailers Kroger, Walmart, Albertsons, and WinCo Foods are recalling more than 28,000 pounds of ground beef over possible E. coli contamination. 

Packages of ground beef, produced by Interstate Meat Dist. Inc. of Clackamas, Oregon on December 20, are being recalled after a sample tested positive for E. coli, according to a statement released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service website on Thursday.

The beef was shipped out to retailers in Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming, according to the FSIS.

"FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers' refrigerators or freezers," the statement says. "Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase."

The recalled beef has the establishment number "EST.965" inside the USDA mark of inspection or printed next to the time stamp and use or freeze by date. All recalled product labels can be found on the USDA's website.

E. coli infection can cause severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Some may experience a mild fever, and most people infected typically get better within five to seven days. Most people start to feel ill within three to four days of consuming contaminated products, according to the CDC.

 

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Walmart, Kroger, and Albertsons recall over 28,000 pounds of ground beef over possible E. coli contamination

Ground beef for sale at Walmart.
Ground beef for sale at Walmart.
  • More than 28,000 pounds of ground beef is being recalled after possible E. coli contamination. 
  • Customers who purchased ground beef from Kroger, Walmart, Albertsons, and WinCo Foods in several states are encouraged to check their products.
  • E. coli infection can cause severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting, according to the CDC.

Retailers Kroger, Walmart, Albertsons, and WinCo Foods are recalling more than 28,000 pounds of ground beef over possible E. coli contamination. 

Packages of ground beef, produced by Interstate Meat Dist. Inc. of Clackamas, Oregon on December 20, are being recalled after a sample tested positive for E. coli, according to a statement released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service website on Thursday.

The beef was shipped out to retailers in Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming, according to the FSIS.

"FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers' refrigerators or freezers," the statement says. "Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase."

The recalled beef has the establishment number "EST.965" inside the USDA mark of inspection or printed next to the time stamp and use or freeze by date. All recalled product labels can be found on the USDA's website.

E. coli infection can cause severe stomach cramps, diarrhea, and vomiting, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Some may experience a mild fever, and most people infected typically get better within five to seven days. Most people start to feel ill within three to four days of consuming contaminated products, according to the CDC.

 

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Experts predict gift returns will reach record highs this holiday season, contributing to more supply chain backlogs

FedEx worker sort through a pile of boxes at the FedEx sort facility at the Oakland International Airport
FedEx workers sort through a pile of boxes at the FedEx sort facility at the Oakland International Airport.
  • Holiday gift returns are expected to be higher than ever this year as online shopping sales surge.
  • Two out of three consumers will return at least one gift during the holiday season this year, according to Optoro.
  • A shopping habit called "bracketing," where customers buy multiple colors or sizes of the same item, is contributing to returns.

Holiday gift returns are expected to be higher than ever this year as online shopping sales surge despite supply chain constraints

An estimated two out of three consumers will return at least one gift during the holiday season this year, according to Optoro, a company that manages returns and excess inventory. Approximately $66.7 billion worth of product is forecasted to be returned by the end of 2021, potentially causing additional supply chain constraints as retailers face shipping delays, increased transportation costs, and labor shortages.

The National Retail Federation expects 2021 online sales this holiday season to reach $222.3 billion, a 13% increase compared to last year. And while the cost of returning purchases has increased by about 33% for retailers compared to last year, free product returns are still a large incentive for customers' online shopping habits, according to Optoro.

Since more consumers began their holiday shopping early this year to account for supply chain disruptions, retailers are seeing returns earlier than usual, according to the commercial real estate services and investment firm CBRE.

In a report published this week, CBRE predicted that early returns may ultimately benefit consumers, as hard-to-find and "top quality merchandise" could make its way back into stores before the Christmas holiday. It could also help retailers trying to avoid losses by making more full margin sales while cutting down on discounting and return rates, CBRE wrote. 

Meanwhile, the growing trend of "bracketing" — in which a customer buys multiple sizes or colors of a single item, chooses the version they like best, and sends the rest back to the retailer — is also contributing to increased returns. Bracketing is especially common when retailers offer free shipping and free returns because customers deem the practice low risk, Insider previously reported. 

While the practice is nothing new, bracketing has been on the rise in recent years. A 2017 survey of 677 US shoppers conducted by the customer-experience platform Narvar, revealed that 40% of respondents bracketed their purchases at least occasionally. Meanwhile, a Narvar survey of 1,004 shoppers from last month showed that percentage has increased, with 58% of respondents stating they bracket their online purchases. 

Although bracketing purchases is convenient for shoppers, last year's product returns generated 5.8 billion pounds of waste and 16 million metric tons of carbon emissions, according to Optoro. With an increase in returns this year, experts expect that number will go up.

"Retailers are increasingly attempting to balance consumer demand with sustainability, while still providing a returns experience that protects brand and customer loyalty," CBRE wrote in its report. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

Experts predict gift returns will reach record highs this holiday season, contributing to more supply chain backlogs

FedEx worker sort through a pile of boxes at the FedEx sort facility at the Oakland International Airport
FedEx workers sort through a pile of boxes at the FedEx sort facility at the Oakland International Airport.
  • Holiday gift returns are expected to be higher than ever this year as online shopping sales surge.
  • Two out of three consumers will return at least one gift during the holiday season this year, according to Optoro.
  • A shopping habit called "bracketing," where customers buy multiple colors or sizes of the same item, is contributing to returns.

Holiday gift returns are expected to be higher than ever this year as online shopping sales surge despite supply chain constraints

An estimated two out of three consumers will return at least one gift during the holiday season this year, according to Optoro, a company that manages returns and excess inventory. Approximately $66.7 billion worth of product is forecasted to be returned by the end of 2021, potentially causing additional supply chain constraints as retailers face shipping delays, increased transportation costs, and labor shortages.

The National Retail Federation expects 2021 online sales this holiday season to reach $222.3 billion, a 13% increase compared to last year. And while the cost of returning purchases has increased by about 33% for retailers compared to last year, free product returns are still a large incentive for customers' online shopping habits, according to Optoro.

Since more consumers began their holiday shopping early this year to account for supply chain disruptions, retailers are seeing returns earlier than usual, according to the commercial real estate services and investment firm CBRE.

In a report published this week, CBRE predicted that early returns may ultimately benefit consumers, as hard-to-find and "top quality merchandise" could make its way back into stores before the Christmas holiday. It could also help retailers trying to avoid losses by making more full margin sales while cutting down on discounting and return rates, CBRE wrote. 

Meanwhile, the growing trend of "bracketing" — in which a customer buys multiple sizes or colors of a single item, chooses the version they like best, and sends the rest back to the retailer — is also contributing to increased returns. Bracketing is especially common when retailers offer free shipping and free returns because customers deem the practice low risk, Insider previously reported. 

While the practice is nothing new, bracketing has been on the rise in recent years. A 2017 survey of 677 US shoppers conducted by the customer-experience platform Narvar, revealed that 40% of respondents bracketed their purchases at least occasionally. Meanwhile, a Narvar survey of 1,004 shoppers from last month showed that percentage has increased, with 58% of respondents stating they bracket their online purchases. 

Although bracketing purchases is convenient for shoppers, last year's product returns generated 5.8 billion pounds of waste and 16 million metric tons of carbon emissions, according to Optoro. With an increase in returns this year, experts expect that number will go up.

"Retailers are increasingly attempting to balance consumer demand with sustainability, while still providing a returns experience that protects brand and customer loyalty," CBRE wrote in its report. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

Weather forces backlog of container ships at California ports to move further out to sea

An overhead shot of the shipping backlog off the coast of Long Beach, California.
An overview of the shipping backlog off the coast of Long Beach, California.
  • Winter weather is causing the backlog of ships at the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles to move further offshore.
  • The ships waiting to dock off California's coast are complying with a new voluntary queuing system to improve safety conditions.
  • The ships are now required to idle between 50 and 150 miles off of the coasts of California and Mexico.

Winter weather is causing the backlog of ships at California's ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles to move further offshore.

High winds and choppy seas can create dangerous situations for cargo ships, forcing the ships waiting to dock at the US's busiest port complex to move further from the coast for safety purposes.

Approximately 30 ships sat off the coast of Southern California this week waiting to unload their cargo, while nearly 60 more stayed in waters further out to sea, according to the Wall Street Journal. Some ships have even reduced their speed to delay their arrival at the ports to reduce wait times.

The ships waiting to dock off California's coast are complying with a new voluntary queuing system to improve safety conditions and air quality around Southern California's ports while also increasing the efficiency of the ports, according to a statement from Pacific Maritime Association, Pacific Merchant Marine Shipping Association, and Marine Exchange of Southern California who worked together to develop the plan last month.

"This system delivers a pragmatic solution through order and predictability that will reduce the number of ships idling off the coast in the coming months, improve safety, and support the efficient movement of container-based goods," PMSA President John McLaurin said in the statement.

Depending on the direction they are coming from, the ships are required to idle between 50 and 150 miles off of the coasts of California and Mexico. While the vessels can still come into the harbor for fuel and crew changes and normal, the change hopes to reduce the "the historic supply chain congestion that continues to slow trade," according to the statement.

Empty shipping containers gathering near the ports are also adding to the congestion, Insider's Grace Kay reported.

The congestion of the nearly 110,000 empty containers spans up to 80 miles away from the port, filling nearby streets and yards and making it more difficult for supply-chain workers to move goods efficiently. 

The empty shipping containers represent another bottleneck in the supply chain and an additional hurdle for ports and warehouses that are running out of space, according to Insider.

The Southern California ports have been struggling to get companies to pick up their goods, while at the same time carriers have faced difficulty returning empty containers.

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5 of the top Twitter moments and trends of the year and what they say about 2021, according to the social platform

A smartphone with the Twitter logo being held in front of the Twitter bird icon.

  • Twitter compiled its most popular tweets, hashtags, and topics of 2021.
  • Many of the top tweets and trends reflect current news and events from the year.
  • Some of this year's most popular tweets came from notable figures including President Joe Biden and K-Pop group BTS.

As 2021 comes to a close, we have a lot to reflect on — especially when it comes to viral social media moments.

To commemorate an eventful year, Twitter compiled 2021's most popular tweets, hashtags, and topics across the platform. Some of this year's most popular tweets may not be a surprise to avid internet users, but in true 2021 fashion, a few unexpected posts and trends topped Twitter this year.

Although there are parts of this year we may wish to forget, users never stopped liking, retweeting, and sharing their thoughts and quips. Here are the top Twitter trends of the year, according to the company.

President Joe Biden had the most liked Tweet of 2021

On the morning of his inauguration, President Joe Biden tweeted "It's a new day in America," ushering in role as the 46th president of the United States. More than four million people liked it. 

The tweet came as Biden — who beat out former President Donald Trump in the tumultuous 2020 presidential election in November — prepared for inaugural ceremonies that spanned a five-day period with multiple virtual and socially-distanced in-person celebrations.

After Biden's victory, and weeks before his inauguration, Trump claimed the election was fraudulent and encouraged his supporters to "stop the steal" at a rally on January 6 that preceded the Capitol insurrection. Trump's voter fraud claims have since been debunked.

The tweet with the most RTs this year was a message from BTS

 

A tweet from the popular K-Pop group BTS encouraging its followers to #StopAsianHate was the most retweeted post of 2021, with over a million retweets, according to Twitter.

BTS currently has more than 42 million followers on Twitter worldwide and fans of the group, known as the A.R.M.Y., were also responsible for making #BTS the top hashtag of 2021, Twitter reported. 

The BTS tweet came a few weeks after a 21-year-old white man shot and killed eight people, six of whom were Asian women, at three spas in the greater Atlanta, Georgia area.

Violence and hate against Asian Americans skyrocketed during the first year of the pandemic. In response, people took to social media using the hashtag #StopAsianHate to spread awareness of the rampant discrimination against Asian American and Pacific Islander communities in the US.

Using the hashtag, notable figures and groups like BTS shared their own experiences with racism, calling on followers to stand up and speak out for groups who are vulnerable to discrimination and violence. "We cannot put into words the pain of becoming the subjects of hatred and violence," BTS tweeted. "You, and I we all have the right to be respected. We will stand together."

In May, President Biden signed a bill into law that addressed the spike in anti-Asian hate crimes over the past year. The COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act directs the Department of Justice to expedite the review of coronavirus-related hate crimes, provide guidance to state and local governments to improve public reporting on hate crimes, and raises awareness about hate crimes during the public-health crisis, Insider reported.

Everyone was talking about trending TV shows this year

 

Staying at home and quarantining during the pandemic changed the way we watch and discuss television shows. 

Reality TV was one of the most tweeted about television genres this year, according to Twitter. The reality competition show Big Brother Brasil was the most tweeted about show this year.

Meanwhile, Squid Game, the Netflix series that took the internet by storm, was the third most discussed TV show worldwide, Twitter reported. Squid Game generated nearly $900 million for Netflix and became the streaming platform's most-watched original show, with over 132 million people watching at least two minutes. 

The Olympics was Twitter's top sporting event

 

After the 2020 Tokyo summer Olympics were originally postponed because of the pandemic, the 2021 games quickly took over Twitter to become the most discussed sports match and event worldwide, according to the social media platform.

The Tokyo games became the most expensive summer games in Olympic history, according to Insider. The games cost more than $26 billion to produce this year.

Twitter's top emojis helped users share their feelings

The "crying face" and "tears of joy" emoji were the top-used emojis on Twitter this year, the social media platform reported.

The laugh-cry emoji, or 😂, was also the most-used emoji in the world this year, according to the Unicode Consortium, the organization responsible for encoding universal characters for the web.

In a study published earlier this month, Unicode reported that 92% of the online population worldwide use emojis, noting that the laugh-cry emoji accounts for 5% of that use. The emoji has been the most popular icon on iOS and macOS devices since at least 2017, according to the data.

The 10 most-used emojis worldwide this year included: 😂 ❤️ 🤣 👍 😭 🙏 😘 🥰 😍 😊 .

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