Archive for Amanda Perelli

The key details to know about Instagram Reels, the app’s TikTok competitor

Instagram Reels Users
Three Instagram influencers use Reels (from left to right): Anna OBrien, Eitan Bernath, and Chriselle Lim.

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli. Welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the influencer and creator economy. Sign up for the newsletter here.

Platforms like Instagram and YouTube have been rushing to compete with TikTok's success by launching their own short-form video features.

As TikTok continues to face threats of a potential US ban, Instagram Reels has developed more creator and marketer interest. 

My colleagues Sydney Bradley, Dan Whateley, and I broke down what content creators, brands, and anyone in influencer marketing should know about Instagram's new feature. 

Although the feature has been dubbed a "TikTok copycat," marketers told us that Reels doesn't have to replace TikTok for it to be a success. If Reels appeals to Instagram-first creators who aren't using TikTok, then the feature could drive revenue — similar to how the Snapchat-copying "Stories" format worked starting in 2016. 

Some creators have already found that certain content performs better on Reels than on TikTok.

Eitan Bernath, a viral teen chef with over 1.3 million followers on TikTok and 409,000 followers on Instagram, told Business Insider that posting Reels helped his Instagram account double in followers in just one month. 

He repurposes a lot of his content between TikTok and Reels, but for Reels specifically, he will make sure there is something visually enticing at the start, since the sound is not automatically turned on (like on TikTok) to order to grab viewers' attention. 

Aside from growth, Reels has also helped creators earn extra income on some brand deals.

Influencers with around 100,000 followers or more could charge between $5,000 and $40,000 for a sponsored Reel, according to Reesa Lake, partner and executive vice president of brand partnerships at the talent agency Digital Brand Architects. And Britney Turner, a fashion and lifestyle "micro" influencer with 27,000 followers, has a starting rate of $2,000 for a Reel.

Read more about Reels and all of the ways marketers and brands are using the new feature, here

A TikTok 'skinfluencer' with over 1 million followers breaks down his daily routine 

Young Yuh Skincare Influencer
Young Yuh is a skincare influencer on TikTok with 1.2 million followers.

Young Yuh, known as yayayayoung, is a TikTok skincare influencer with over 1 million followers.

Sydney spoke with Yuh about his account surging in popularity online, his own skincare routine, and inside his growing business. 

Yuh is part of a surge in skincare content across social media, a category which saw a 197% increase in engagements between the first half of 2019 and the first half of 2020, according to data from Traackr, an influencer-marketing platform.

In May, skincare brands started reaching out to Yuh for potential partnerships on TikTok, he said. After researching on Craigslist and Indeed about how much money videographers and production assistants make hourly, he calculated his starting rates for his content: between $1,000 and $3,000. 

His morning skincare routine includes using a cleansing foam and exfoliating. He also applies a sunscreen after moisturizing. 

Check out his full routine, from skincare to work, here

A YouTube creator with about 380,000 subscribers shares the media kit she uses to land brand deals

Jade Darmawangsa media kit

Jade Darmawangsa has 381,000 YouTube subscribers and has expanded her channel into a full-time business by working with brands on sponsorships and collaborations.

I spoke with Darmawangsa about how she lands brand deals and how much she charges on average. 

Darmawangsa shared that she uses a media kit, a document that showcase an influencer's value to a brand or company, to land sponsorships on YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok. 

On average, she charges between $2,000 and $5,000 for a YouTube brand sponsorship, and between $500 and $2,000 for a sponsored Instagram post, she said.

Darmawangsa's media kit highlights her audience demographics and some of her past work.

Check out her exact 4-page media kit, here.

How Instagram Reels' new audio features will help it compete with TikTok for marketing dollars

Instagram Reels - audio features.
Instagram Reels introduced new audio features to make songs more discoverable and shareable on Thursday, October 8, 2020.

Instagram introduced a series of product updates last week to make trending songs on its short-form video feature Reels more discoverable.

Dan reported that the audio-focused updates should appease the music marketers who told Business Insider that Reels' lack of a robust song discovery system made it difficult to promote tracks on the app.

Music is a core part of TikTok's user experience.

To bring Reels up to par, Instagram developed a new song discovery page featuring "trending" tracks, added the ability to share audio pages with friends in direct messages, and created an option for users to bookmark songs for later use (similar to the "favorite" feature in TikTok).

Read more about the new music features here

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  • We are still seeking nominations for the influencer "collab" houses that have had the greatest impact on the creator industry this year. Submit your ideas here.

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Jeffree Star poses for photos at Cosmoprof at BolognaFiere Exhibition Centre on March 17, 2018 in Bologna, Italy.
Jeffree Star.

Leaked Jeffree Star messages show he deleted more than 400 crude tweets as he accused rival YouTuber James Charles of sexual misconduct

Controversial makeup influencer Jeffree Star – who has more than 44 million followers across his social media platforms – hired a fan to help him delete crude tweets and direct messages. 

Insider reporter Kat Tenbarge wrote that the makeup mogul deleted more than 400 old, potentially offensive tweets in the days after he accused rival YouTuber and beauty guru James Charles of sexual misconduct. 

Insider learned of the coordinated effort to delete the tweets after a former fan of Star's shared a series of direct messages with Star that appear to show him helping Star identify which tweets to delete.

In exchange for his assistance, Star promised in the leaked messages, but later rescinded, tickets to one of Star's Masterclass events. Insider was able to confirm the identity of the former fan, who asked to remain anonymous for fear of professional repercussions, through his verified accounts.

Insider confirmed the exchange began one day after Star had accused Charles of being a "predator" and a "danger to society."

Read the full story here

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8-year-old Ryan Kaji is the world’s top-earning YouTube star. His parents took us inside his business, which had over $200 million in retail sales last year and employs a 30-person production team.

Ryan
Ryan Kaji

 

 

The 8-year-old YouTuber Ryan Kaji has transformed the future of kids entertainment by becoming a new model of cross-platform child star.

Kaji now earns millions each year from his lucrative business empire across YouTube, TV, and the shelves of major retailers like Target and Walmart. 

But his rise to fame started on YouTube in 2015, with videos of him unboxing toys. 

"Viewership doubled and tripled each month after that point," Ryan's father, Shion, told Business Insider. "More than just in the US, we see that growth globally. At first, I was very confused and surprised to see our homemade-quality videos being watched by so many kids around the world." 

With the help of his business-savvy parents and Pocket.Watch, a studio that represents the family, Kaji has expanded beyond YouTube by starring in shows on Nickelodeon and Roku, and selling branded products in stores.

In 2019, Ryan's family renamed the YouTube channel to "Ryan's World," a franchise they started that has continued to grow, earning more than $20 million a year in advertising revenue from YouTube, and generating more than $200 million in retail sales from branded products that year, according to a family spokesperson.

Business Insider spoke with Ryan's father, Shion, and mother, Loann, about their business and how they manage Ryan's personal life and YouTube fame.

Ryan
Ryan's World YouTube channel

Building a 30-person production company and filming shows for Nickelodeon and Roku

Ryan's channel started with videos of him opening and reviewing toys. In July 2015, one of his early "unboxing videos" went viral. The video, which now has more than 1 billion views, featured Ryan opening and reviewing a box containing more than 100 toys from Pixar's "Cars" series.

Shortly after, Ryan grew a name for himself online as the boy on YouTube who reviews toys, and throughout the years his videos have shifted from toys to challenges and educational videos, like DIY science experiments.

"I feel like Ryan's relationship with his fans is very unique and different from talent on TV," Shion said. "His relationship with his fans is more of a friendship where every time we meet Ryan's fans and their family, they always mention, 'Oh, my son or daughter thinks they are Ryan's best friend.'"

In 2017, the family signed with the full-service entertainment studio for internet creators, Pocket.Watch. The company acts as an agent for Ryan's brand, Ryan's World, and has invested in building an empire around the YouTube star.

But as Ryan's fame grew, his parents recognized the need to create a larger team around him and make the filming process more efficient for Ryan.

"So he can still enjoy the life of a normal kid," Shion said. 

Now the family manages a 30-person production company, Sunlight Entertainment, in their home state of Texas. 

"What we thought is best for him, would be starting out a production company to help streamline the workflow on the channel and also minimize Ryan's participation in the videos," Shion said. "The main thing is Ryan's privacy and his childhood. And we also wanted to prioritize Ryan's education over anything else."

When Ryan is attending school during the day, Shion and Loann will usually head to their office and work with their team of editors, animators, and voice actors to produce content. The team works on developing live-action and animated content across the company's nine multilingual YouTube channels: Ryan's World, Ryan's World Español, Ryan's World in Japanese, EK Doodles, Ryan's Family Review, VTubers, Combo Panda, Gus the Gummy Gator and The Studio Space. (Since the coronavirus outbreak the family has been working from home, they said.)

"When we started our own company, the first thing we did was make sure Ryan was always the central part of the brand," Shion said. "We tried to create a universe around Ryan but within that universe there are animated characters that are friends of Ryan and their personalities are based on Ryan's basic attributes. When [fans] watch the content through those characters they still feel the connection they have with Ryan."

There is a universe of products around Ryan, as well.

Pocket.Watch brought the Ryan's World brand to Colgate, Nickelodeon, Roku, and Walmart. Pocket.Watch has developed over 100 licensees, from launching an entire line of Ryan's World consumer products with toy-manufacturing company Bonkers, to creating and producing "Ryan's Mystery Playdate," which airs on Nickelodeon. The company recently launched an ad-supported channel called "Ryan and Friends," available to stream on The Roku Channel.

bonkers toys
Ryan Kaji's YouTube channel "Ryan ToysReview," has 21 million subscribers.

Managing Ryan's personal life, YouTube, and TV show

Typically, Shion said they will film content with Ryan for about one hour during the weekday (some weeks Ryan doesn't film at all during the week), and about three hours on the weekend.

"With traditional media, kids are on set all day," Loann said. "What we are trying to do is give him a normal childhood. He has plenty of time to do and explore other interests." 

"We felt like that really helped us not burn out – not just Ryan but Loann and myself too were able to balance out our personal lives and work," Shion added. 

Before stay-at-home orders, Ryan was involved in several after-school activities – like swimming, computer coding, and taekwondo – Loann said.

"Whatever Ryan wants to film we always make sure we can accomplish it," Shion said. "The second thing is, Loann used to teach high school chemistry and her passion has always been teaching children. After some time, we felt like that was a very important component on YouTube: education. Over time, we've changed our brand focusing more and more on educational content." 

Shion also said the family's goal is to expand their reach into new places like Japan (Ryan is half Japanese), as well as Spanish-speaking countries. 

"We want to make sure Ryan understands and learns the history of his background too," Shion said. "So, we are trying to get more and more projects in Japan as well." 


For more on the business of Ryan's World, read these interviews on Business Insider:

Read the original article on Business Insider

Federal authorities ordered a Texas woman to pay $3.8 million for selling stolen goods on eBay for 19 years

ebay seller business owner package box shipping
  • A Texas woman has to pay $3.8 million for selling shoplifted merchandise on eBay for 19 years, the Department of Justice said. 
  • Kim Richardson, a 63-year-old Dallas resident, pleaded guilty in December and was ordered on Thursday to serve 54 months in federal prison.
  • Richardson "used shoplifting tools to disable security devices and would exit the store by placing the stolen merchandise in a large black bag she carried," a department release said
  • She participated in a "multi-million dollar interstate theft ring" that spanned from August 2000 through April 2019, according to federal authorities.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A Texas woman will serve prison time and has to pay $3.8 million in damages for selling shoplifted merchandise on eBay for 19 years, the Department of Justice said. 

Kim Richardson, a 63-year-old Dallas resident, participated in a "multi-million dollar interstate theft ring" that spanned from August 2000 through April 2019, according to a press release. In that time, federal investigators said she traveled around the United States and shoplifted merchandise that she later sold directly to customers on eBay. 

"She used shoplifting tools to disable security devices and would exit the store by placing the stolen merchandise in a large black bag she carried," the release said. "Richardson assisted in the sale of the items on the internet as well as packaging and mailing the stolen items."

About $3.8 million was sent in total to four PayPal accounts linked to Richardson from buyers, throughout the 19 years.

The Secret Service and FBI investigated the case and assistant US Attorney Belinda Beek of the Southern District of Texas prosecuted the case.

Richardson pleaded guilty in December. She was ordered to serve 54 months in federal prison and her sentence will be followed by three years of supervised release.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A man attempted to steal $6 million in PPP loans after submitting applications for companies with names from ‘Game of Thrones’: report

Daenerys outside Meereen Game of Thrones season four
Emilia Clark as Daenerys Targaryen in season four.
  • A North Carolina man was charged after reportedly trying to steal over $6 million in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans for submitting applications for companies with names from "Game of Thrones."
  • In April, the US government launched the PPP as a way to help small businesses financially amid the pandemic. These loans must be used for payroll costs, rent and utilities. 
  • Tristan Bishop Pan was charged with wire fraud, bank fraud, and engaging in unlawful monetary transactions on September 29 for false companies named White Walker, Khaleesi, and The Night's Watch, according to the Department of Justice.  
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

A North Carolina man was charged after reportedly trying to steal over $6 million in Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans for companies with names from "Game of Thrones." 

Tristan Bishop Pan, 38, was charged with wire fraud, bank fraud, and engaging in unlawful monetary transactions on September 29 after submitting applications for companies named White Walker, Khaleesi, and The Night's Watch (all references to the popular HBO show), according to the Department of Justice.  

"Pan made false statements about the companies' employees and payroll expenses," according to the DOJ. "The PPP loan applications were supported by fake documents, including falsified tax filings, according to the indictment."

He reportedly submitted 14 PPP loan applications over $6.1 million, and he received more than $1.7 million in benefits after being approved for two applications. The government seized some of the allegedly fraudulent loan benefits, according to the DOJ. 

In April, the US government launched the PPP as a way to help small businesses financially amid the pandemic. These loans must be used for payroll costs, rent, and utilities. 

The US Small Business Administration guarantees PPP loans under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, and they released the names of hundreds of thousands of small businesses that received funding from the PPP in July.

The CARES Act was built to provide emergency financial assistance to Americans who are suffering economically from the coronavirus pandemic. But the program has been under scrutiny over the possibility of fraud.

In July, some banks filed a record-high number of claims of suspected business-loan fraud, according to a report from The Project on Government Oversight.

The report analyzed previously unreported government data to the Treasury Department, stating that they are uncertain that there has been "minimal fraud in the Paycheck Protection Program" the report said. 

Several other people have reportedly submitted fake applications. 

Recently, a prominent Hawaii defense contractor was charged with bank fraud and money laundering for stealing more than $12.8 million in PPP loans, as 

Read the original article on Business Insider

Trump’s Hollywood star vandalized with a pickaxe hours after he tests positive for COVID-19

President Trump's Hollywood Walk of Fame star.
Workers reconstruct Trump's star after it was destroyed early Friday morning.
  • President Trump's Hollywood Walk of Fame star was vandalized on Friday, hours after the announcement that he and Melania tested positive for the coronavirus, according to the LA Police Department. 
  • The star was vandalized with a pickax by someone dressed in a Hulk costume, TMZ reported
  • In the last few years, Trump's Hollywood star has been vandalized several times with a sledgehammer and pickax.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump's Hollywood Walk of Fame star was vandalized again, this time on Friday morning.

Police responded to around 5:50 a.m. and a vandalism report was taken, according to the LA Police Department. 

TMZ reported that the star was destroyed by a person dressed in an Incredible Hulk costume. 

The person smashed Trump's star with a pickaxe hours after the announcement that the president and First lady Melania Trump tested positive for the coronavirus. Trump has since been transferred to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, just outside of Washington, D.C.

Workers began reconstructing Trump's star on Friday afternoon after it was destroyed early that morning. 

USA Today reported that any vandalized or destroyed star is replaced by the Hollywood Historic Trust.

Since being elected, Trump's Hollywood star has been vandalized several times with spray paint, a sledgehammer and pickax. 

In 2007, the star was dedicated to Trump for his NBC show, "The Apprentice," and for his work as a producer for the beauty pageant franchises he owned. And in 2018, Comedian George Lopez pretended to urinate on the star using a water bottle

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to land a job at Instagram, according to insiders

Instagram NYC office
Instagram.

Happy October! This is Amanda Perelli. Welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the influencer and creator economy. Sign up for the newsletter here.

It can be hard to land a job at Instagram, and some candidates have found creative ways to get a hiring manager's attention.

Instagram offers perks and benefits like free food and long paid leave programsIts New York headquarters features a gelato bar, library, and made-for-Instagram backdrops.

My colleagues Sydney Bradley and Lauren Johnson spoke with a handful of former employees about what it takes to get through the interview process and land a job at Instagram. 

Some key takeaways: 

  • Hiring managers look for candidates who understand Instagram's products as well as its competitors like TikTok and Snap.
  • A former Instagram recruiter from 2016-2019 recommended candidates understand the problems the company is facing and come with solutions to those problems.
  • One former employee advised being able to talk about what the company was focused on so they can discuss them in the interview. 

Pre-pandemic, candidates would usually be invited to an on-site interview on one day, since applicants may be coming from different cities, with three to five interviews scheduled that day, a former Instagram recruiter said.

Hiring managers are interested in seeing how candidates creatively solve problems and are passionate about working at Instagram. 

Read more on how to land a job at Instagram, according to former employees here

How influencers make money on Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok

Brianna Nichole
Brianna Nichole.

Some top influencers are earning huge paychecks.

Brand partnerships are the best known way that influencers make money. But there are many others. My colleagues Dan Whateley, Sydney Bradley, and I broke down the main ways influencers make money online. 

Some of the ways influencers earn money on and off those platforms include: 

  • Sponsored content
  • Joining a Partner Program or Creator Fund
  • Selling branded merchandise or apparel

Many creators go beyond a platforms built-in monetization features, earning additional revenue through app marketing and promoting product sales on other websites like Etsy and Depop. And with the help of a manager or agent, creators can get lucrative sponsorship deals with big consumer brands.

Check out the nine main ways influencers earn money here

New data shows activewear brands spiking on social media

instagram igtv ads monetization
Instagram influencer Charlee Atkins.

While the fashion industry at large struggles in the pandemic, activewear is thriving, with sales and engagement spikes across social media.

Sydney broke down key findings from Traackr's latest report, including top activewear brands and fashion influencer content by category.

The number of influencers mentioning activewear brands rose 101% in the first half of 2020 versus the year-ago period, Traackr reported.

Here's a look at how fashion influencer content has been performing by category, according to Traackr's analysis of the first half of 2020 versus a year earlier:

  • Activewear (+331% engagements)
  • Sleepwear (+177%)
  • Sustainable (+81%)

Read more for the full list and data on the activewear boom here

5 top-performing skincare brands on social media in the last year

Skincare

"Skinfluencers" like Skincare By Hyram have gone viral in recent months, promoting brands like CeraVe and The Ordinary in their content.

Sydney broke down the key findings from Traackr's latest report, including the top five skincare brands and "up and coming" skincare influencers with high engagement.

In the first half of 2020, the total number of engagements on skincare-related content increased by 197% versus a year ago, according to Traackr. 

"Skinfluencer" favorites, CeraVe and Vaseline led the way and had the highest increase in engagement among the brands in Traackr's data, with CeraVe increasing its engagements by 309% and Vaseline by 377%. 

Creators on TikTok have been sharing their skin before and afters using the regimen Skincare By Hyram recommends in his videos. 

"He was promoting us as part of a regimen to treat what I would call teenage acne," said Tom Allison, CeraVe's cofounder, and the company has since hired Hyram. "A lot of his followers are that Gen Z-er that's going through those skin issues."

Read more on the top performing skincare brands in the last year here

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This week from Insider's digital culture team:

QAnon Trump
A Donald Trump supporter holding a QAnon flag visits Mount Rushmore National Monument on July 01, 2020 in Keystone, South Dakota. President Donald Trump is expected to visit the monument and speak before the start of a fireworks display on July 3.

How QAnon is hooking Americans with its 'save the children' anti-pedophilia rhetoric

QAnon is a conspiracy movement that's spread among extremists and the far-right. 

Their theories center on Donald Trump as the protagonist breaking up a sprawling child trafficking ring run by powerful media figures and Democrats. 

Rachel Greenspan from Insider wrote that experts in human trafficking say the QAnon-led charge to save the children is misguided and misinformed. 

As early as April, several popular lifestyle influencers on Instagram were spreading the conspiracy theory's messaging by repackaging it as a call to end human trafficking.

The influencers, most of whom are white women, pivoted their content from lifestyle, parenting, and fashion, to home in on QAnon talking points, emphasizing religious or child-rearing angles. 

Read the full analysis here

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How Instagram Reels compares to TikTok for influencer brand deals

influencer ambassador programas 4x3

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the influencer and creator economy. Sign up for the newsletter here.

When an influencer becomes a "brand ambassador," they are often signing up for a long-term partnership with several exclusive perks that can help their career.

But what exactly does a brand ambassador get and how can someone apply?

My colleague Sydney Bradley and I decided to look deeper into what some top fashion and beauty brands offer brand ambassadors and how to get into their programs. 

We found that while the terms of these programs vary widely, what usually separates a brand ambassador program from other brand sponsorships or affiliate programs is the length, as an ambassador program can often can last several months to over a year.

Some offer tropical beach vacations and access to other exclusive events, but usually the most valuable perks are the free products and inside access to the brand, industry insiders said.

Check out the top 9 fashion and beauty ambassador programs in 2020 and the perks they offer, here.

A lawyer explains why influencers should always pay close attention to 'usage rights'

Amanda Schreyer
Amanda Schreyer

Influencers who create content for brands own the legal rights to that content. This means that without permission, brands cannot re-post or repurpose that influencer's content elsewhere.

That's what makes "usage rights" — which refers to the ways brands seek to re-use the influencer's content — such a hot topic in influencer contracts.

Sydney spoke with with several influencers, managers, and lawyer Amanda Schreyer (who works closely with content creators), about what usage rights mean, what to look for in contracts, and how to negotiate extra fees.

Veronica Bonilla, a content creator on Instagram with around 50,000 followers, said a brand requested usage rights to her images for three years as part of a recent campaign and her management negotiated payment of over $20,000. The added usage rights for three years tripled her base rate for this partnership, she said.

But sometimes usage rights can be tricky to navigate, and influencers should always make sure they know what they are agreeing to before they sign a contract.

Read more about how "usage rights" work and what to look out for, here.

How Instagram Reels compares to TikTok for brand deals 

Chriselle_Lim
Chriselle Lim posted the same video on TikTok and Instagram, which performed better on Reels.

Instagram introduced its short-form video feature Reels on August 5, and although it looks at first glance like a TikTok copycat, influencers say Reels is already showing signs of being different in fundamental ways.

Sydney spoke with creators and industry professionals about why some think Instagram has an advantage over TikTok when it comes to brand partnerships with influencers, especially in the fashion, beauty, and luxury spaces.

Influencer Chriselle Lim, who has around 1 million followers on Instagram and 2 million on TikTok, said she sees more revenue potential in Reels, even though she's built a wildly popular "Rich TikTok Mom" character on TikTok.

She said she thinks Reels will perform well for brands, especially those in fashion, as it's a "great way to show collections in very short-form content, which they didn't have before."

Read more about how Reels compares to TikTok for brand deals, here.

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meteor meatier lizemopetey dinosaur tiktok
Eliza Petersen acts out a tragic misunderstanding between God and an angel in a now-viral TikTok.

This week from Insider's digital culture team: 

Industry updates: 

mrbeast jeffree star faze clan ppp loans
MrBeast YouTube LLC, Jeffree Star Cosmetics, and FaZe Clan Inc. all reportedly received PPP loans.

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How much money a thrifting YouTube creator makes per month on the platform

Alexa Hollander youtube
Alexa Hollander

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the influencer and creator economy. Sign up for the newsletter here.

This week, my colleague Sydney Bradley interviewed Alexa Hollander, who is known as Alexa Sunshine on her YouTube channel, about how she makes money from thrift-store shopping videos and how she built a career around sustainable fashion.

Hollander turned her YouTube channel into a full-time job last September, signing with a management team and quitting her job in retail to focus on social media. 

She's part of a trend of "thrift with me" YouTube videos, which have surged in popularity in the last few years. Videos with "thrifting in" or "how to thrift" in the title increased by 10X between 2017 and 2019, according to YouTube's culture and trends data.

She has around 230,000 subscribers and generally makes between $3,000 and $6,000 each month in pre-tax revenue from Google-placed ads placed on her YouTube videos.

Hollander has also partnered with a few brands — like ThredUp (an online thrift store and resale company) and Goodwill — but she said these deals can be tricky to navigate because of how central the values of sustainability and minimizing consumption are to her brand.

"It made it hard for me to work with brands," Hollander said of shifting her content more toward sustainability and thrifting and actively speaking out against fast fashion.

Still, Hollander frequently receives new offers from fast-fashion brands. 

"Like, did you watch my videos?" she laughed. "Because if you would watch my videos, you probably wouldn't want to work with me."

Read the full post here for more about Hollander and her strategies for earning ad revenue on her videos

TikTok has been testing in-video shopping starting with Shopify and Teespring

TikTok Teespring integration.
A TikTok video featuring a shopping button.

TikTok recently introduced the ability for some users to add shopping buttons that link to e-commerce platforms like Shopify and Teespring in their videos. 

My colleague Dan Whateley spoke with creators who have been testing out the new feature to learn more about how it works.

This feature could help boost merch and direct-to-consumer sales for TikTok's creators – a key source of income for some influencers.

But some creators who spoke with Dan said adding the shopping link to a post hurt video performance when compared to non-promotional posts.

"For some reason, at least on our channel and in our experience, when we use the shop button in our videos to promote Teespring or other brand deals or ads or use the sponsored tab, the videos do not get pushed by the algorithm," said Sergio Rodriguez, a creator who has been using TikTok's new shopping feature to link to Teespring merchandise that he created with his twin brother.

TikTok said its recommendation system relies on a variety of factors that are unique to each individual user when determining what videos they see. The company said it was still evaluating how users engage with e-commerce links, and should have a clearer idea on functionality and discoverability for these posts once the feature is fully rolled out. 

Read the full post here.

How much money an Instagram plant influencer charges for a sponsorship

Nick Cutsumpas plantfluencer
Nick Cutsumpas, Nick Cutsumpas, @FarmerNickNYC

Nick Cutsumpas is a part-time creator with over 63,000 followers on Instagram. He posts content about houseplants and sustainability. 

Sydney spoke with Cutsumpas about how he negotiates his brand deals, what his content strategies are, and what his standard rates are for sponsored content on Instagram.

Throughout the week, he balances creating sponsored content for brands on Instagram (and sometimes TikTok), while still operating his own client-based plant coaching and landscaping business. 

With houseplant sales and interest rising, Custumpas's growing audience has increased his reach. His Instagram follower count has been growing at around 8% per month, compared to a 5% rate prior to March.

"I've had to turn down 75% of the companies that want to work with me just because they don't share those same sustainability values and are greenwashing," he said.

A fun fact: Typically, any post with him posing with a monstera plant (the popular houseplants with split leaves) is guaranteed to do well on Instagram, he said. 

Read the full post here.

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Tanya Zuckerbrot F-Factor
F-Factor CEO Tanya Zuckerbrot.

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