Archive for Amanda Perelli

A rare Roman mosaic was discovered buried beneath a farmer’s field in the UK

Roman Mosaic
Mosaic stock image.
  • A Roman mosaic and villa was discovered beneath a farmer's field in the UK.
  • The mosaic depicts scenes from Homer's "The Iliad" and lies within an elaborate villa complex.
  • The rare mosaic was found by the family that owns the land during lockdown last year.

The first Roman mosaic of its kind in the UK has been discovered. 

The initial discovery of the rare mosaic was made during the 2020 lockdown by Jim Irvine, son of the landowner, Brian Naylor.

The mosaic depicts scenes from Homer's "The Iliad," and part of the story of the Greek hero Achilles. Along with the mosaic, lies a surrounding villa complex.

John Thomas, deputy director of University of Leicester Archaeological Services and project manager on the excavations, called it "the most exciting Roman mosaic discovery in the UK in the last century," according to The Guardian.

Both have been protected as a scheduled monument, and during the 2020 lockdown, Historic England was able to secure funding for urgent archaeological investigations of the site.

Staff and students from the University of Leicester's School of Archaeology and Ancient History further examined the site in September 2021.

The rare art lies on the floor of what is thought to be a dining or entertaining area, according to the site Historic England.

Mosaics were often used in private and public buildings across the Roman Empire. Some feature famous figures from history and mythology. This mosaic is particularly unique to the UK because in it features Achilles and his battle with Hector at the conclusion of the Trojan War, making it one of only a handful of examples from across Europe.

The villa that was discovered is also surrounded by a range of other buildings and features, including aisled barns, circular structures and a possible bath house.

The complex is likely to have been occupied by a wealthy individual, from the late Roman period, with a knowledge of classical literature.

The site is on private land and not accessible to the public.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Amsterdam airport officials employed a herd of pigs to stop birds flying into plane engines, risking crashes and engine damage

Schiphol pigs
Schiphol International Airport in Amsterdam launched a pilot program to find out whether pigs might be able to help ward off birds on airport grounds.
  • Pigs were used to fend off birds around the main international airport of the Netherlands.
  • The pilot program launched in Amsterdam was established to reduce the number of bird strikes.
  • About 20 farm animals were used to chase away larger birds from aircrafts.

In Amsterdam, pigs were recently used to help fend off birds from airport grounds. 

About 20 farm animals were used to chase off larger birds, such as geese, in the area surrounding Schiphol International Airport in Amsterdam, the airport said in a press release.

The pilot project was conducted in September to find out whether pigs might be able to help ward off birds from aircrafts. Birds are a danger for airports and planes because they can cause damage if they get sucked into plane engines. They can also damage to the plane exterior, cause crashes, and harm passengers. 

How it works: the pigs would be able to come and eat the crop leftovers, which attract birds, removing a source of food.

The pigs grazed on a plot of land between two runways where sugar beets were recently harvested. Bird activity in the area with the pigs was compared to a plot without pigs. 

Schiphol is the main international airport of the Netherlands, and one of the biggest transport hubs in Europe. It's the third busiest airport in Europe, following London Heathrow and Paris Charles de Gaulle.

The six-week pilot project ended in the first week of November, Schiphol spokeswoman Willemeike Koster told CNN.

Koster said that the project was "informative," and that the data collected will be examined in the coming months, and a decision on the longer-term use of pigs is expected early next year.

In 2020, the airport saw around 150 bird strikes, Koster told CNN. Birds tend to cause serious danger to aircrafts when the animals are sucked into the engines.

Schiphol is also taking structural measures to keep birds away from aircrafts. For instance, 20 bird controllers were set up to keep track of bird activity at the airport.

The controllers work throughout the airfield to keep the birds away at all hours of the night and day by using special sounds and laser beams. Other measures are also in place, like using special types of grass that's unappealing for birds.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Pinterest will start paying creators to post content

Creator Rewards on Pinterest pay influencers for content

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the business of influencers, creators, and social-media platforms.

Before we begin, some news: This is the last edition before our newsletter goes on hiatus.

Thank you so much for reading and following our coverage of the industry! While we're on hiatus, you can keep up with me on Twitter at @arperelli. Plus, be sure to follow the rest of our team: Dan Whateley @dwhate, Sydney Bradley @SydneyKBradley, JP Mangalindan @JPManga, and Michael Espinosa @Michael__Esp.

And to get "Insider Exclusives," our email alerts - sign up here by topic.

Insider will be in touch soon with some newsletter updates. In the meantime, please take this brief survey to help us improve our newsletters. But until then, let's get right to this week's edition.

In this week's edition:


Colleen Stauffer, Pinterest exec headshot smiling

A Pinterest exec explains the details of its new $20 million investment into paying creators

Pinterest will start paying eligible creators in the US for posting content.

The blogger-beloved platform is the latest to reveal a flashy monetization program similar to programs from Snapchat, Instagram, and even LinkedIn.

Sydney Bradley spoke with a Pinterest exec about the platform's $20 million payout that will fund "Creator Rewards."

Here's what you need to know about the roll-out:

  • The fund will pay creators if they participate in "reward goals" or various themed posting challenges.

  • These incentives come with end dates, and creators will be paid according to the number of engagements a post gets.

  • Eligible creators can access these rewards in a new dashboard called the "Creator Hub."

"It is really our first big initiative for monetization for creators," said Colleen Stauffer, Pinterest's global head of creator marketing.

Check out more on the new fund and how creators can get paid, here.

Cameo CEO Steven Galanis
Cameo CEO Steven Galanis

Why the shout-out app Cameo is open to deepfake technology on its platform

Cameo CEO Steven Galanis said the company is open to deceased celebrities joining its platform using deepfake technology.

"We could go to their estate and offer a great new income stream for people that have passed away," he said.

Dan Whateley wrote that the remarks came during an interview at the Wall Street Journal's Tech Live event.

Galanis said Cameo would only consider adding a celebrity to its platform if it was something their estate endorsed.

"If their estate is like, 'Hey we would not want to do that,' like of course we wouldn't do it without their permission," he said.

Check out more on Galanis' thoughts on deepfake shout-outs, here.

Here's what else you need to know this week:

What's trending

Creator earnings

Market moves


Instagram creator and model Amy Lefevre
Instagram creator and model Amy Lefevre

Instagram creator and model Amy Lefévre took us inside her fashion collection with INSPR

Instagram creator Amy Lefévre, who modeled for Chanel and Dior, is releasing a fashion line with INSPR.

JP Mangalindan wrote that Lefévre's knitwear collection, due out in October, was the product of a seven-month collaboration.

Founded in 2018 by Chantel Waterbury, INSPR has developed and released seven limited-edition capsule collections to date with creators. Lefévre's upcoming line is one of 11 influencer collaborations in the works at INSPR.

Here's more on the upcoming capsule collection.

A composite image of Jake Aronow and Alexander Levenson with both wearing dark t-shirts and hats
Jake Aronow and Alexander Levenson

How a gaming startup is looking to launch Twitch's next streaming stars by helping them get discovered

Hover is a startup hoping to help solve Twitch's discoverability problem.

Michael Espinosa wrote that on the platform, users can scroll through gaming clips, with the option to like, comment, and share, and it allows users to quickly follow streamers on Twitch and tune into Twitch streams without leaving the app.

So far, the platform's userbase is small, with only about 27,000 mobile app downloads, but it boasts high engagement.

Katherine "Katliente" Pan, a streamer who judged one of the "Next Top Streamer" broadcasts, told Insider that Hover had been an effective place to network with other creators and find partners to collaborate on content with.

Read more on the gaming startup, here.


using smartphone texting social media in city

Seeking nominations: Top women personal-finance influencers

We want to hear from you! What are the top women-led financial accounts on social media?

To highlight the women making an impact in the space, I am working on a new power list with my colleague Laila Maidan of the top women personal-finance influencers.

Please submit your ideas through this form.


TikTok

TikTok hashtag of the week:

Every week, we highlight a top trending hashtag on TikTok, according to data provided by Kyra IQ.

This week's hashtag: NoBones

  • Percentage uptick over the last 7 days: 8,072%

  • The latest viral hashtag is centered around a popular series of videos from TikTok creator Jonathan Graziano and his pug, Noodle. "No-bones days" are named after Noodle flopping back into bed in the mornings. These videos have been taken as predictions about how the day will go.


cocomelon

What else we're reading and watching:

Subscribe to the newsletter here.

And before you go, check out the top trending songs on TikTok this week to add to your playlist. The data was collected by UTA IQ, the research, analytics, and digital strategy division of United Talent Agency.

UTA IQ

Subscribe to the newsletter here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Seeking nominations for the top women personal-finance influencers

using smartphone texting social media in city
  • Insider is compiling a list of the top women-led financial accounts on social media.
  • We are looking for women who are helping to recenter the narrative of personal finance.
  • Please submit your ideas or nominations through this form (or below) by October 21.

There's a growing class of breakout stars who are gaining popularity online by sharing personal-finance advice.

On YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok, these influencers give tips on how to save money and invest.

To highlight the women making an impact in the space, Insider is launching a new power list of the top women personal-finance influencers.

We want to know: What are the must-follow personal-finance accounts run by women?

We will feature women creators on YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok. The list will be determined by Insider based on our reporting and the nominations that we receive, and we'll take into consideration factors like audience size, advice, and impact on the influencer business as a whole.

Please submit your ideas through this form by October 21, or enter the information below:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How much influencers get paid on Instagram, TikTok, and YouTube

Charli Prangley
Charli Prangley.
  • Influencers get paid a number of ways, from sponsorships to ad revenue.
  • How much creators earn depends on factors like following size, engagement, and content category.
  • We spoke with dozens of influencers who shared how much money they'd earned on social media.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Influencers earn money a number of ways, from sponsorships to selling merchandise.

How much money different creators make depends on a variety of factors, from content category to what platform the influencer is prominent on.

For Jehava Brown, a stay-at-home mom who runs a full-time influencer business, her monthly income comes from working with brands like Walmart, Amazon, and Disney on paid partnerships.

Brown has 196,000 followers on Instagram. She recently told Insider that she charges an average $5,000 for a single Instagram post and $3,000 for an Instagram Story.

Insider has spoken with dozens of other influencers on Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok about how much each of them makes from videos, sponsorships, and other revenue streams.

Here's a breakdown of our coverage:

Jehava Brown
Jehava Brown.

How much influencers earn from brand deals

Many influencers rely on sponsored content - from a set of Instagram posts and Stories to a dedicated YouTube video promoting a company - to earn money.

Rates for these types of brand deals vary based on an influencer's engagement rate, platform, and other factors like usage rights.

Here's a breakdown of our coverage of how much influencers make for brand deals and sponsorships.

YouTube

Instagram

TikTok

How much influencers earn from affiliate links

Some influencers use platforms like LiketoKnow.it and ShopStyle to generate affiliate links, or discount codes provided by brands, to earn a percentage of sales.

Read more about how much influencers make from affiliates:

How much influencers make selling direct-to-consumer products and merch

Social-media stars are increasingly leveraging their presence online to create consumer products to sell directly to their followers.

Influencer-lead DTC brands first began popping up earnest in 2012, with companies like the fitness program, "EmFitChallenge"; the phone case company, Wildflower Cases; and the cold-press juice line, Suja.

Read more:

How much influencers make reselling clothing

Resale apps like Poshmark, Depop, and Etsy have become lucrative small businesses for many creators, particularly on Instagram.

Read more:

How much influencers make promoting songs, especially on TikTok

One of the most popular ways to earn money as a TikToker is by promoting songs in videos. Music marketers and record labels regularly pay TikTok users to post on the app in an attempt to make a new track go viral.

Read more about how TikTok creators make money from song promotions:

Tomi Obebe
Tomi Obebe.

How influencers make money directly from Instagram

Getting tips via Instagram Badges

In 2020, Instagram announced "Badges," which allows fans to tip creators who livestream on the app. Instagram also started paying some creators who use Badges with "Bonuses" in June.

Read more:

Graham Stephan
Graham Stephan.

How influencers make money directly from YouTube

Many YouTube creators earn money off the ads that play in their videos and receive a monthly payout.

Creators who are part of the Partner Program can monetize their videos with Google-placed ads. Creators must have at least 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 watch hours in the past year to apply for the Partner Program. Google then pays creators 55% of the revenue their channels earn from the ads that run on them.

Here's a breakdown of how much money YouTubers make in a month from the Partner Program:

YouTube's central creator monetization metric is called revenue per mille (RPM). That rate shows how much revenue a creator earns per every 1,000 video views (after YouTube's 45% cut). No creator consistently makes the same rate, which depends on factors like the viewers and advertisers the video attracts.

Here's a breakdown of how much money some YouTubers have made for 1,000 views (RPM), for 100,000 views, 1 million views, and the most they've made from a single video:

Symphony Clarke Thrift TikTok
Symphony Clarke.

How influencers make money directly from TikTok

To earn money directly from TikTok, users must be 18 years or older, meet a baseline of 10,000 followers, and have accrued at least 100,000 video views in the last 30 days. Once they reach that threshold, they can apply for TikTok's Creator Fund through the app.

Read more about how much TikTok creators make from the Creator Fund:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How much money YouTubers make, according to dozens of creators

Charlie Chang
Charlie Chang.
  • YouTube creators who are part of the Partner Program can monetize their videos with ads.
  • The amount of money different creators make per video varies based on a variety of factors.
  • We spoke with dozens of creators who shared how much money they've earned on YouTube.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

This is the latest installment of Insider's YouTube money logs, where creators break down how much they earn.

Social-media creators who are part of the YouTube Partner Program can earn money off their videos with Google-placed ads.

To start earning money directly from YouTube, creators must have at least 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 watch hours in the past year. Once they reach that threshold, they can apply for YouTube's Partner Program, which allows creators to start monetizing their channels through ads, subscriptions, and channel memberships.

Creators on YouTube can earn their money a number of ways, from sponsorships to selling merchandise.

But revenue from Google ads is a big chunk of many YouTube stars' incomes.

For instance, finance YouTuber Nate O'Brien made $444,000 in revenue from YouTube ads in a year with about 1 million subscribers. Those Google-placed ads were his top source of income.

But YouTube creators can make money with far fewer followers. Nano influencer Jen Lauren, who had 1,900 YouTube subscribers when she spoke with Insider, earned $195 in a recent month.

When it comes to a viral video, how much money a YouTube creator makes can vary wildly. We spoke with YouTubers who broke down how much they'd made on videos with 1 million views, and their answers ranged from about $3,400 to $40,000, depending on the type of content and viewer demographics.

In all, Insider has spoken with dozens of YouTube creators about how much each of them made per month, on videos with 100,000 or 1 million views, and other financial topics.

Here's a comprehensive breakdown of Insider's YouTube money logs series:

How much money YouTubers make a month

Many YouTube creators earn money off the ads that play in their videos and receive a monthly payout.

So how much do YouTubers generally make per month?

Here's a full breakdown of our coverage of how much YouTuber creators earn monthly:

How much money YouTubers make per 1,000 views (RPM)

For every 1,000 ad views, advertisers pay a certain rate to YouTube. YouTube then takes 45% and the creator gets the rest.

Some subjects, like talking about money on YouTube, often can boost a creator's ad rate by attracting a lucrative audience.

How much do creators earn per 1,000 views (called the RPM rate)?

Here's a full breakdown of our coverage of what YouTube creators earn per 1,000 views:

How much money YouTubers make on a single video

Creators on YouTube often have no idea how much money they will earn off a single video after they upload it to the platform.

Many creators also try to avoid swearing or copyrighted music in their content because those factors can increase a video's chance of getting flagged by YouTube and demonetized.

So if a creator does everything right in the eyes of YouTube, how much can they expect to make at the top end?

We asked 17 YouTube creators what the most money they'd made of a single video was.

Read the full post: YouTube stars reveal the most money they've made from a single video

How much money YouTubers make for 100,000 views

How much money a single YouTube video with 100,000 views makes from Google-placed ads depends on the content of the video and the audience who watches.

The amount of money a video will earn also depends on its watch time, length, and video type, among other factors.

Here's a full breakdown of our coverage on how much YouTube creators make for 100,000 views:

How much money YouTubers make for 1 million views

Though making money from YouTube depends on a variety of factors, amassing 1 million views can often net a creator a big payday.

Here's a full breakdown of our coverage of how much YouTube creators make for 1 million views:

Read the original article on Business Insider

Seeking nominations for the leading women in gaming and esports

Gaming

Navigating the gaming industry can be particularly challenging for women.

The male-dominated space has faced a slew of problems, from a lack of diversity and inclusion to continued sexism and harassment.

Just last month, California's Department of Fair Employment and Housing filed a lawsuit against Activision Blizzard claiming the company fostered a culture of sexual harassment. As a result, employees staged a walkout at the company's headquarters in Los Angeles and J. Allen Brack stepped down from his role of CEO at Blizzard.

To highlight the women making an impact in the space, Insider is launching a power list of the leading women in the esports and gaming industries. In this list, we will feature women creators and execs who are driving change and helping build successful businesses.

We want to hear from you for nominations. Please submit your ideas through this form by August 13, or enter the information below:

The list will be determined by Insider based on our reporting and the nominations that we receive.

The rankings will factor in the exec or creator's role, responsibility, and impact on the space broadly.

Check out our previous power list highlighting the top 16 talent managers and agents for gaming creators for a sense of how this list will look.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to create an influencer media kit to get brand deals

Marina Mogilko
Marina Mogilko
  • Social-media influencers use media kits to pitch themselves to brands.
  • These documents often provide metrics and some kits also include pay rates.
  • We spoke with a dozen creators who shared the exact media kits they use.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Many social-media creators rely on brand deals as their main source of income.

Influencers can offer advertisers a range of content types - like in-feed posts on Instagram, a 30-second TikTok, or a mention on YouTube.

Brands are hiring creators with nano (fewer than 10,000 followers) to mega audiences across a wide range of categories.

To land these deals, some influencers will use a media kit to showcase their value to a company.

Many media kits include:

  • A cover page
  • Audience metrics, like core follower demographics
  • A list of advertisers the influencer has worked with
  • Past campaign case studies
  • Pay rates
  • And contact information

Some influencers will send a media kit to every advertiser they work with. They keep this document up-to-date by adding new metrics and collaborations every few months.

Marina Mogilko
Mogilko uses a 24-page media kit.

Here are 12 examples of real media kits that influencers use to land brand deals

YouTube:

Roberto Blake
Roberto Blake

Instagram:

Alexa Collins - Instagram influencer
Alexa Collins

TikTok:

"I think it's super important if you want to take this seriously," Macy Mariano said of media kits. "I send them now to everyone I get in touch with. It's just a good way to express who you are and what you've done so they can see your past and current work."

Read the original article on Business Insider

Venmo added new privacy options after President Joe Biden’s account was discovered

GettyImages 1227801650
In this photo illustration the Venmo - Share Payments logo seen displayed on a smartphone.
  • Venmo added new added in-app privacy controls after President Joe Biden's account was discovered.
  • The president's account was discovered earlier this month by reporters in just minutes of searching.
  • The new update lets users set their friends list to be public, visible to friends, or private.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Venmo has added new privacy options after reporters found President Joe Biden's account in "less than 10 minutes" of searching.

Venmo, an app for digitally transferring money to and from people you know, added in-app privacy controls which let users set their friends list to be public, visible to friends, or private.

This change comes after the President's Venmo account was discovered after just a few minutes of searching, Buzzfeed News reported on May 14.

Venmo accounts by default display connections, or "friends." Accounts for Biden's children and grandchildren were among those connected to the president's account, according to Buzzfeed.

The search for Biden's account began after The New York Times on Friday published an inside look at Biden's time in the White House. The story said: "One advisor said he had sent the grandchildren money using Venmo."

A Venmo spokesperson told Insider the company is "consistently evolving and strengthening the Venmo platform for all of our customers."

" As part of these ongoing efforts, we have added in-app controls providing customers an option to select a public, friends-only, or private setting for their friends list. We look forward to continuing to provide customers with a seamless payments experience," the spokesperson said.

Software developer Jane Manchun Wong was first to share the news on Friday: "Venmo is working on friends list privacy settings after Joe Biden's Venmo friend list was uncovered. Users will also be able to choose whether to appear in other users' friends lists."

"As of now, Venmo's Friends List Privacy is on "Public" by default The screenshot shows "Private" was picked because I tapped the option as soon as I saw it," Wong added.

Wong doesn't work for Venmo, but she's built a following among tech workers, journalists, and enthusiasts for digging up and publicizing unreleased features long before they're officially announced.

To set your friends list to be private, tap the three stacked lines on the upper right of the main feed, then tap "Settings," "Privacy," and then "Friends List." From here, you can make your friends list visible to any logged in Venmo user, your friends, or only you. You can also choose if you want to appear in other users' friends lists.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Twitter is pausing its new public verification program a week after relaunching the process

Twitter
Twitter is already pausing public verification.
  • Twitter is pausing public verification requests to review the ones that have been submitted.
  • This comes eight days after announcing it was reopening the process for the first time since 2017.
  • Twitter's blue check mark has long been a status symbol, and marks the authenticity of an account.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Twitter is pausing public verification requests for the coveted blue check.

This comes eight days after the company announced it was reopening its verification process for the first time since 2017.

Twitter announced on Friday that the public process has been paused to review the requests that have been submitted.

The company announced the update in a Tweet on May 28: "We're rolling in verification requests. So we gotta hit pause on accepting any more for now while we review the ones that have been submitted. We'll reopen requests soon! (we pinky swear)."

Twitter's blue check mark has long been a status symbol, and is designed to mark the authenticity of a user's account.

The company originally said it would gradually roll the application out to users within the next few weeks.

With this new process, anyone can apply to be verified under the account settings section of the app.

In order to qualify for verification, the user must have adhered to Twitter's rules within the past 12 months and been active on the platform within the last six months.

Twitter said users who are approved will immediately receive a blue check mark, while those who are rejected can apply again after a 30-day waiting period.

The public application system was paused in 2017, with high profile figures still able to receive verification on the app. This came after the company gave one of the "verified" badges to the organizer of the Charlottesville "Unite the Right" rally.

Read the original article on Business Insider