Archive for Amanda Perelli

Why a YouTube creator has focused on email as a way to connect directly with her fans

Erika Kullberg
  • YouTuber Erika Kullberg believes creating an email list is an important business tool for creators.
  • Email is one way for influencers to communicate directly with their fans off social media.
  • This tool offers a more direct way for influencers to promote something, and earn money.
  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

Building an email list is one major way some influencers are communicating directly with fans and earning money beyond social media.

Having access to a fan's personal email is a more direct way to promote something as an influencer and sell a product or service to followers.

Erika Kullberg, an attorney who runs a personal-finance YouTube channel with 76,000 subscribers, told Insider that an email list is the most valuable asset a creator can have since it gives the creator a direct line of access to their audience.

"I think of other platforms, like YouTube, as rented land," Kullberg said. "The YouTube algorithm controls the reach. Over the past six months or so, I've put much more focus on growing my email list and have now grown it to over 20,000."

Kullberg used her email list to promote and sell a course on mastering YouTube. Over 100 people have enrolled in the course since she launched it late last year, and she has earned over $36,000 in sales, she said.

To grow her email list, she created a free 12-page PDF with some tips related to YouTube. Followers can download the guide on her website, and after they do, she will send them a series of emails with additional YouTube tips and promote the course within the emails.

"I found that this results in higher conversions rather than trying to sell the course directly," she said.

Read more on how Kullberg used an email list to market and sell a course:

How to create and sell an online course, according to a YouTuber who has made $36,000 in revenue from her first one

Read the original article on Business Insider

The top PR pros for influencers on Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok

top PR pros for influencers and social media 4x3

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the business of influencers, creators, and social-media platforms. Sign up for the newsletter here.

In this week's edition:

The top 18 PR pros and publicists for influencers

Influencers famous for their work on YouTube, Instagram, and YouTube are landing late-night TV spots and appearing on the cover of magazines.

To make it happen, many hire publicists with experience representing Hollywood actors and musicians.

Dan Whateley, Sydney Bradley, and I are recognizing the top PR pros who work with influencers and digital creators.

Here are some of the executives highlighted in our second annual power list:

  • Nicole Perez-Krueger, founder of Align Public Relations, represents Charli D'Amelio and her family.

  • Cole Chasen Trider, founder and CEO of Chasen Creative Media, worked with top YouTube and beauty influencer Jackie Aina on promoting her lifestyle brand FORVR mood.

  • Dave Kim, founder and CEO of Dave Kim PR, has secured his clients coverage in the The Wall Street Journal, Forbes Magazine, and Billboard. He represents creators of the influencer collab house Team RAR.

Check out the full list of top publicists, here.

Influencers are rushing to make money on NFTs using virtual avatars, digital collectibles, and one-off art

Jake Paul as a 3D influencer
Jake Paul launched a 3D avatar with the company, Genies, as he plans to begin selling NFTs to fans.

Some influencers are rushing to cash in on non-fungible tokens (NFTs) as the market heats up.

NFT platforms are reporting a spike in sales and for some, the internet trend can bring a big payday.

Dan wrote that influencers Logan Paul, Zach "ZHC" Hsieh, and the virtual influencer Miquela have all experimented with NFTs:

  • Creators are hoping that NFTs will offer another way to interact directly with fans and earn money.

  • The barriers to entry for creators looking to test out NFTs are relatively low, and some platforms have set up ways to make it easier to get started.

  • Jake Paul launched his own virtual avatar on Tuesday and plans to sell digital items like boxing gloves to fans soon.

"Of course influencers are showing up, there's a lot of money to be made," said Kayvon Tehranian, the founder and CEO of the NFT auction platform Foundation.

Have more information on NFTs? Email Dan: [email protected]

Read more about NFTs, here.

Inside Dunkin's influencer-marketing strategy, from hiring Charli D'Amelio to employees posting on TikTok

Charli D'Amelio / Dunkin

After Charli D'Amelio gave Dunkin' millions of free video impressions, the brand decided to hire her as an official brand ambassador.

"What we've noticed is, in order for us to be successful, we really need to tap into what's already happening around our brand," said Melanie Cohn Rabino, the director of brand engagement at Dunkin'.

Dunkin' has used social media to help promote products by hiring influencers, employees, and fans to film content for TikTok.

I spoke with Dunkin' about the company's TikTok strategy and partnership with D'Amelio:

  • The brand only follows die-hard Dunkin' fans on TikTok, and has turned the act of finding new people to follow into a way to boost engagement, launching contests around it on the app.

  • Dunkin' launched a crew-ambassador program as a way to pay its employees to post TikTok videos while on the job.

  • It has leaned into hiring micro influencers who specialize in a particular niche, such as food, to help introduce a new product.

Read more about the brand's social-media strategy here.

How influencers and marketers are using Clubhouse to strike brand deals and make new connections

clubhouse app
Clubhouse Drop-in audio chat app logo on the App Store is seen displayed on a phone screen in this illustration photo taken in Poland on February 3, 2021.

Influencers are landing brand deals by networking on the audio-only app Clubhouse.

Sydney wrote that some "rooms" on the app are connecting industry professionals such as social-media managers, casting agents, and brand executives with influencers.

  • Within these rooms, influencers are pitching themselves to marketers or simply chatting about their careers and interests.

  • Then, they move those conversations from Clubhouse to DMs or emails to start talking business.

  • Some have used Clubhouse to get hired for campaigns on other platforms, such as Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok.

Read more about how influencers and marketers use Clubhouse, here.

More creator industry coverage from Insider:

TikTok

Media kits

This week from Insider's digital culture team:

vlog squad rape accusations david dobrik durte dom 4x3

A woman featured on YouTube star David Dobrik's channel says she was raped by a Vlog Squad member in 2018 the night they filmed a video about group sex

David Dobrik's Vlog Squad is one of the most beloved friend groups on YouTube.

Now, an extra in a 2018 vlog says she was too intoxicated to consent to sex with Dominykas Zeglaitis, aka Durte Dom, during the night they were filming for the vlog.

The same woman says she was raped and that she believes the video's portrayal of the sex as consensual is inaccurate.

Read the full investigation by Insider reporter Kat Tenbarge, here.

More on digital culture:

schuyler mckinley squishmalllow collection
Schuyler McKinley's Squishmallow collection.

Here's what else we're reading:

Subscribe to the newsletter here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Influencers react to an Instagram test that removed public ‘like’ counts

Instagram app
Instagram.

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the business of influencers, creators, and social-media platforms. Sign up for the newsletter here.

In this week's edition:

An Instagram test gave a glimpse of a world without public 'like' counts and some influencers say it would be better

Many users found out what Instagram looks like without "like" counts on Tuesday after the app accidentally widely expanded a test to remove the public displays of the number of likes.

The wide rollout was because of a bug, but signals Instagram is still testing removing like counts.

Sydney Bradley broke down how a change like this could impact the influencer industry: 

  • Seeing the number of likes is a constant source of competition for many creators, influencer Andrea Pion Pierre said.

  • Influencer Khadijah Lacey-Taylor said removing like counts could be an opportunity for creators to look more holistically at how engaging and enjoyable their content is.

  • A downside: for emerging creators who've quickly gained a following but aren't on brands' radars yet, their number of likes is one of the few ways to show influence (before sending screenshots of metrics).

Read the full post with more reactions here.

Instagram takes on Clubhouse by letting up to 4 speakers livestream together and make money from tips and brand deals

instagram live clubhouse feature

Instagram has expanded its livestreaming feature, which now allows up to four speakers.

The update comes as the live-discussion app Clubhouse surges in popularity.

Sydney reported on what the new update entails and how it could impact creators' businesses:

  • Instagram is expanding livestreaming by doubling Instagram Live's capacity to four speakers at once with the introduction of "Live Rooms."

  • The host can add or remove any of three speakers throughout a livestream, similar to how moderators maintain the "stage" on Clubhouse.

  • Creators will also be able to use "Badges," Instagram's tipping feature, in these rooms. And there's brand deal potential.

Read the full post here.

How influencers are using a new affiliate-marketing tool to text message their fans and drive sales

MagicLinks

Social-media influencers are using text messages to connect with fans and drive affiliate-marketing sales.

Affiliate marketing platform MagicLinks is testing a tool, called Text2Shop, that lets influencers mass send shoppable links to fans.

Sydney and I reported on how influencers are using this new tool:

  • Text2Shop was created by MagicLinks in partnership with the text-marketing startup Community.

  • College student Nazjaa Hughson has driven over $15,000 in sales since she started using Text2Shop with an average conversion rate of 6%. 

  • Hughson wants her fans to feel like they are getting "exclusive content," different from what's on her social channels. She dedicates time every now and then to directly chat back and forth with her followers.

Check out the full post here.

17 YouTube stars break down how much they get paid per month for their videos

Maya Lee

Creators who are a part of YouTube's Partner Program can monetize their YouTube videos with ads.

Factors like whether a video went viral, or whether the audience that watches their content is valuable to advertisers, will determine what a creator earns per paycheck.

Sydney and I spoke with 17 influencers on how much they'd earned in a month on YouTube, ranging from $82 to $141,356. 

Check out the full post here.

More creator industry coverage from Insider:

This week from Insider's digital culture team:

David Dobrik Jason Nash

David Dobrik talked about a prank that a former Vlog Squad member now calls sexual assault in an old podcast episode

In resurfaced podcast audio, David Dobrik talked about a prank on Seth Francois.

Insider reporter Lindsay Dodgson reported that Francois now says he considers the incident, where Jason Nash kissed him, sexual assault.

In the clip, Dobrik confirms that Francois had no prior knowledge that he would be kissing Nash.

Read the full post here.

More on digital culture: 

jackie aina makeup

Here's what else we're reading: 

Subscribe to the newsletter here. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

Influencers react to an Instagram test that removed public ‘like’ counts

Instagram app
Instagram.

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the business of influencers, creators, and social-media platforms. Sign up for the newsletter here.

In this week's edition:

An Instagram test gave a glimpse of a world without public 'like' counts and some influencers say it would be better

Many users found out what Instagram looks like without "like" counts on Tuesday after the app accidentally widely expanded a test to remove the public displays of the number of likes.

The wide rollout was because of a bug, but signals Instagram is still testing removing like counts.

Sydney Bradley broke down how a change like this could impact the influencer industry: 

  • Seeing the number of likes is a constant source of competition for many creators, influencer Andrea Pion Pierre said.

  • Influencer Khadijah Lacey-Taylor said removing like counts could be an opportunity for creators to look more holistically at how engaging and enjoyable their content is.

  • A downside: for emerging creators who've quickly gained a following but aren't on brands' radars yet, their number of likes is one of the few ways to show influence (before sending screenshots of metrics).

Read the full post with more reactions here.

Instagram takes on Clubhouse by letting up to 4 speakers livestream together and make money from tips and brand deals

instagram live clubhouse feature

Instagram has expanded its livestreaming feature, which now allows up to four speakers.

The update comes as the live-discussion app Clubhouse surges in popularity.

Sydney reported on what the new update entails and how it could impact creators' businesses:

  • Instagram is expanding livestreaming by doubling Instagram Live's capacity to four speakers at once with the introduction of "Live Rooms."

  • The host can add or remove any of three speakers throughout a livestream, similar to how moderators maintain the "stage" on Clubhouse.

  • Creators will also be able to use "Badges," Instagram's tipping feature, in these rooms. And there's brand deal potential.

Read the full post here.

How influencers are using a new affiliate-marketing tool to text message their fans and drive sales

MagicLinks

Social-media influencers are using text messages to connect with fans and drive affiliate-marketing sales.

Affiliate marketing platform MagicLinks is testing a tool, called Text2Shop, that lets influencers mass send shoppable links to fans.

Sydney and I reported on how influencers are using this new tool:

  • Text2Shop was created by MagicLinks in partnership with the text-marketing startup Community.

  • College student Nazjaa Hughson has driven over $15,000 in sales since she started using Text2Shop with an average conversion rate of 6%. 

  • Hughson wants her fans to feel like they are getting "exclusive content," different from what's on her social channels. She dedicates time every now and then to directly chat back and forth with her followers.

Check out the full post here.

17 YouTube stars break down how much they get paid per month for their videos

Maya Lee

Creators who are a part of YouTube's Partner Program can monetize their YouTube videos with ads.

Factors like whether a video went viral, or whether the audience that watches their content is valuable to advertisers, will determine what a creator earns per paycheck.

Sydney and I spoke with 17 influencers on how much they'd earned in a month on YouTube, ranging from $82 to $141,356. 

Check out the full post here.

More creator industry coverage from Insider:

This week from Insider's digital culture team:

David Dobrik Jason Nash

David Dobrik talked about a prank that a former Vlog Squad member now calls sexual assault in an old podcast episode

In resurfaced podcast audio, David Dobrik talked about a prank on Seth Francois.

Insider reporter Lindsay Dodgson reported that Francois now says he considers the incident, where Jason Nash kissed him, sexual assault.

In the clip, Dobrik confirms that Francois had no prior knowledge that he would be kissing Nash.

Read the full post here.

More on digital culture: 

jackie aina makeup

Here's what else we're reading: 

Subscribe to the newsletter here. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

The top influencer mansions where creators make content for TikTok and YouTube

creator house database 4x3

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the influencer and creator economy. Sign up for the newsletter here.

In this week's edition:

Team RAR

The top influencer mansions and who lives in them

Lavish creator mansions extend far beyond prominent groups like The Hype House and Sway House, and this trend is surging across the world, from Los Angeles to London.

We put together an interactive database of the top influencer mansions and who lives in them.

Content houses aren't new, and top gaming creators, Vine stars, and YouTubers have led the trend for years.

But the concept found new relevancy among TikTok stars starting with The Hype House, which brought together 19 influencers in an LA mansion in 2019. 

Here are some highlights from our database:

  • The Wave House, based in London, gained two million followers within three weeks of its launch. Now, the group works with brands like Pretty Little Thing.

  • Based in Atlanta, The Valid Crib started as a group of 20 creators messaging over Instagram and Snapchat.

  • ByteHouse is a group of UK-based TikTok stars and the creators have worked with Nickelodeon and Boohoo.

Looking forward: The trend isn't slowing down and creators are quickly scaling business by collaborating together and pitching themselves to brands as a bundle.

Check out the interactive database here.

Have more information on creator houses? Email me: [email protected]

How fast-fashion brand Princess Polly became a Gen-Z favorite

Princess Polly TikTok Influencers
Carolina Freixa (left) and Demi Diamandis (right) are influencers that Princess Polly works with.

Australian fast-fashion brand Princess Polly became a favorite among US teens in 2020, partly thanks to TikTok.

My colleague Sydney Bradley created a case study of the brand:

  • It was at the right place at the right time when it joined TikTok in October 2019. 

  • The brand benefitted from the rise of TikTok "try-on hauls" and an army of influencers it had built up over the past few years.

  • Beyond influencers, Princess Polly has also found success through paid ads on TikTok.

Read more about the brand's social media strategy here.

The top platforms influencers are using to sell online courses

top platforms companies influencers courses webinars 4x3

During the pandemic, many creators have embraced selling courses as a new revenue stream.

Fitness influencers are launching at-home workouts and food bloggers are hosting their own cooking classes.

Sydney Bradley and Mark Stenberg broke down the top platforms for building courses.

Plant influencer Darryl Cheng said he earned about $2,000 per month from his course hosted on Teachable, one of the platforms.

Check out the 10 platforms here.

Yahoo News is surging on TikTok

Yahoo! News TikTok account.

Yahoo News recently hit 1 million followers on TikTok.

My colleague Dan Whateley wrote that the outlet's success shows how interest in news content is on the rise on TikTok.

He spoke with the team behind the account to learn more about Yahoo's TikTok strategy:

  • TikTok has helped Yahoo News reach a new Gen-Z audience. 

  • The team uses TikTok's livestreaming feature to broadcast events like the White House press briefing.

  • Yahoo News uses the comments section to gather questions and then host Q&As with reporters.

  • The team uses TikTok's "green screen," "duet," and "stitch" effects to drive engagement on the app.

Read more about Yahoo News' TikTok account here.

More creator industry coverage from Insider:

Brittany Broski attends The 9th Annual Streamy Awards on December 13, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (
Brittany Broski attends The 9th Annual Streamy Awards on December 13, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.

Industry updates:

  • TikTok launched a weekly podcast hosted by Brittany Broski, call the For You Podcast. Episodes can be found on TikTok (@TikTok) and all of the major streaming platforms.

  • A new management firm launched: Underscore Talent Management Agency. Founding members include industry execs Michael Green, Reza Izad, Dan Weinstein, Austin Mayster, Linnea Toney, and Megan Brown.

This week from Insider's digital culture team:

LovelyPeaches_Header
Lovely Peaches

Controversial influencer Lovely Peaches told her arresting officer that she sprayed perfume in her dog's eyes to get followers, according to police report

Influencer Lovely Peaches was recently arrested on suspicion of animal cruelty.

Brittany Johnson, aka Lovely Peaches, has been a controversial social-media figure for almost five years.

Insider reporters Moises Mendez II and Kat Tenbarge reported that Johnson told police that she sprayed her dog in the eyes with perfume to gain followers.

The report says she made "statements about harming or killing her dog" to earn followers.

Read more here.

More on digital culture: 

  • Insider's digital culture team is hosting a Clubhouse panel on Thursday at 1 p.m. EST about the recent feud between Jeffree Star, Shane Dawson, and Trisha Paytas. More info here.
League of Legends

Here's what else we're reading: 

One last thing!

We are considering starting an Insider Influencers Discord server. Is that something you'd be interested in joining? Are there any other platforms you think we should be on? Let me know: [email protected]

Subscribe to the newsletter here. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

The top influencer mansions where creators make content for TikTok and YouTube

creator house database 4x3

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the influencer and creator economy. Sign up for the newsletter here.

In this week's edition:

Team RAR

The top influencer mansions and who lives in them

Lavish creator mansions extend far beyond prominent groups like The Hype House and Sway House, and this trend is surging across the world, from Los Angeles to London.

We put together an interactive database of the top influencer mansions and who lives in them.

Content houses aren't new, and top gaming creators, Vine stars, and YouTubers have led the trend for years.

But the concept found new relevancy among TikTok stars starting with The Hype House, which brought together 19 influencers in an LA mansion in 2019. 

Here are some highlights from our database:

  • The Wave House, based in London, gained two million followers within three weeks of its launch. Now, the group works with brands like Pretty Little Thing.

  • Based in Atlanta, The Valid Crib started as a group of 20 creators messaging over Instagram and Snapchat.

  • ByteHouse is a group of UK-based TikTok stars and the creators have worked with Nickelodeon and Boohoo.

Looking forward: The trend isn't slowing down and creators are quickly scaling business by collaborating together and pitching themselves to brands as a bundle.

Check out the interactive database here.

Have more information on creator houses? Email me: [email protected]

How fast-fashion brand Princess Polly became a Gen-Z favorite

Princess Polly TikTok Influencers
Carolina Freixa (left) and Demi Diamandis (right) are influencers that Princess Polly works with.

Australian fast-fashion brand Princess Polly became a favorite among US teens in 2020, partly thanks to TikTok.

My colleague Sydney Bradley created a case study of the brand:

  • It was at the right place at the right time when it joined TikTok in October 2019. 

  • The brand benefitted from the rise of TikTok "try-on hauls" and an army of influencers it had built up over the past few years.

  • Beyond influencers, Princess Polly has also found success through paid ads on TikTok.

Read more about the brand's social media strategy here.

The top platforms influencers are using to sell online courses

top platforms companies influencers courses webinars 4x3

During the pandemic, many creators have embraced selling courses as a new revenue stream.

Fitness influencers are launching at-home workouts and food bloggers are hosting their own cooking classes.

Sydney Bradley and Mark Stenberg broke down the top platforms for building courses.

Plant influencer Darryl Cheng said he earned about $2,000 per month from his course hosted on Teachable, one of the platforms.

Check out the 10 platforms here.

Yahoo News is surging on TikTok

Yahoo! News TikTok account.

Yahoo News recently hit 1 million followers on TikTok.

My colleague Dan Whateley wrote that the outlet's success shows how interest in news content is on the rise on TikTok.

He spoke with the team behind the account to learn more about Yahoo's TikTok strategy:

  • TikTok has helped Yahoo News reach a new Gen-Z audience. 

  • The team uses TikTok's livestreaming feature to broadcast events like the White House press briefing.

  • Yahoo News uses the comments section to gather questions and then host Q&As with reporters.

  • The team uses TikTok's "green screen," "duet," and "stitch" effects to drive engagement on the app.

Read more about Yahoo News' TikTok account here.

More creator industry coverage from Insider:

Brittany Broski attends The 9th Annual Streamy Awards on December 13, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (
Brittany Broski attends The 9th Annual Streamy Awards on December 13, 2019 in Los Angeles, California.

Industry updates:

  • TikTok launched a weekly podcast hosted by Brittany Broski, call the For You Podcast. Episodes can be found on TikTok (@TikTok) and all of the major streaming platforms.

  • A new management firm launched: Underscore Talent Management Agency. Founding members include industry execs Michael Green, Reza Izad, Dan Weinstein, Austin Mayster, Linnea Toney, and Megan Brown.

This week from Insider's digital culture team:

LovelyPeaches_Header
Lovely Peaches

Controversial influencer Lovely Peaches told her arresting officer that she sprayed perfume in her dog's eyes to get followers, according to police report

Influencer Lovely Peaches was recently arrested on suspicion of animal cruelty.

Brittany Johnson, aka Lovely Peaches, has been a controversial social-media figure for almost five years.

Insider reporters Moises Mendez II and Kat Tenbarge reported that Johnson told police that she sprayed her dog in the eyes with perfume to gain followers.

The report says she made "statements about harming or killing her dog" to earn followers.

Read more here.

More on digital culture: 

  • Insider's digital culture team is hosting a Clubhouse panel on Thursday at 1 p.m. EST about the recent feud between Jeffree Star, Shane Dawson, and Trisha Paytas. More info here.
League of Legends

Here's what else we're reading: 

One last thing!

We are considering starting an Insider Influencers Discord server. Is that something you'd be interested in joining? Are there any other platforms you think we should be on? Let me know: [email protected]

Subscribe to the newsletter here. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

Marques Brownlee details his business as a tech YouTuber and how he makes money on the platform

Marques Brownlee
Marques Brownlee.
  • Marques Brownlee, known as MKBHD online, has 13 million YouTube subscribers. 
  • Brownlee is a tech YouTube creator, and his videos include reviews on the latest smartphones, tech unboxings, and smartphone-camera tests.
  • Brownlee on a recent podcast discussed his business as a digital creator and how he makes money.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Marques Brownlee was saving up his allowance money in high school when he decided to launch a YouTube channel. 

The money he was saving up would help him buy a new laptop, where he could film and edit videos.

In 2009, he filmed his first tech-review video, which focused on the media-center remote that came with his new laptop. Now 12 years later, his channel has become one of the top tech channels on YouTube and has 13 million subscribers.

Brownlee's videos on YouTube include reviews on the latest smartphones, tech unboxings, and smartphone-camera tests. He has interviewed top tech CEOs from Elon Musk, Bill Gates to Mark Zuckerberg.

To help run the day-to-day of his creator business, Brownlee signed with the talent agency WME, and he has a small team of motion graphics artists, cinematographers, and assistants. 

But, how does a digital creator on YouTube earn money? 

"Oh, this is the number one holiday family reunion question," Brownlee told Nilay Patel in a recent episode of The Verge's podcast "Decoder."

Digital creators like Brownlee often have several revenue streams, as they typically don't rely on just one form of income.

Read more: A 5-step guide to making the most money possible from YouTube video ads, with advice from top creators

For most YouTubers, their main source of revenue comes from the ads placed in their videos by Google.

"So, YouTube ads is the primary, fundamental way that YouTubers make money," Brownlee said on the Verge podcast. "You upload a video, there's ads somewhere on it or in it, and the YouTuber gets paid for the placement of those ads because they brought the eyeballs to the video."

But YouTube ad rates fluctuate month to month, and at the start of the coronavirus pandemic, some YouTube creators saw a decline in their March earnings as advertisers pulled campaigns and lowered budgets. That is why most creators have several different streams of income that all connect back to their larger online business. 

Here is a breakdown of the main ways Brownlee makes money as a creator:

YouTube

Google's AdSense program

Creators who are part of YouTube's Partner Program are able to make money from their YouTube channels by placing ads within a video. These ads are filtered through Google's AdSense program.

To be accepted into YouTube's Partner Program, creators must have 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 watch hours, and once they are in, their videos are monetized with ads filtered by Google. How much money a creator earns (called AdSense) depends on the video's watch time, length, video type, and viewer demographics, among other factors. YouTube also keeps 45% of the ad revenue, with the creator keeping the rest. 

"Generally, the fundamental building blocks of making money as a YouTuber, and for me, come from AdSense built into YouTube, sponsored integrations built into the videos and on the channel, and merch stuff, too," Brownlee said on the Verge podcast.

Promoting brands through sponsorships 

Brownlee said on the Verge podcast that he also earns money by promoting brands in his YouTube videos. 

For mega YouTubers like Brownlee, brand deals are often negotiated with an agent or manager. 

"I negotiate the rate," Brownlee said on the Verge podcast. "The contract is usually built by my agent. I work with WME. And so, their lawyers will look over the contract and negotiate the terms, so I'm not literally reading the contracts. That's an arm I chopped off. I used to do that, too. They take their cut, obviously, for also bringing some of those contracts and companies to my inbox. But at the end of the day, if you could see the amount of stuff we say no to - it's just like a constant flow of, 'We want to be on the channel. We want to be in a video' - to find the stuff that really makes sense. And then, that's just me going, 'Let's see how we can make this work best.'"

Read more: 9 real media kit examples that influencers on YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok use to get brand sponsorships

mkbhd marques brownlee

Selling branded merchandise 

Some influencers own a warehouse from which they ship T-shirts, hoodies, and other branded accessories, and then they will sell those online through an e-commerce platform, like Shopify.

But influencers don't have to run their own merch operation to take advantage of the business opportunity. Many, like Brownlee, partner with a company (he sells merch through the site Cotton Bureau.)

"For example, we have a merch store. You can buy apparel that has our cool designs on it," Brownlee said on the Verge podcast.

When a revenue stream dips or advertising budgets dry out, merch sales can make up for a loss in revenue.

Read more: The top 7 merchandise companies helping creators on YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok earn money without relying on ads

Read the original article on Business Insider

Elon Musk’s SpaceX reportedly plans to drill near a Texas launchpad for natural gas

FILE PHOTO: SpaceX founder and chief engineer Elon Musk speaks at a post-launch news conference to discuss the  SpaceX Crew Dragon astronaut capsule in-flight abort test at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S. January 19, 2020. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
SpaceX founder and chief engineer Elon Musk speaks at a post-launch news conference to discuss the SpaceX Crew Dragon astronaut capsule in-flight abort test at the Kennedy Space Center.

Elon Musk, who recently relocated to Texas, now reportedly has plans to to drill for natural gas there, too. 

SpaceX, Musk's space company, is looking to drill wells close to the company's Boca Chica, Texas, launchpad, according to Bloomberg. The site in Boca Chica previously hosted prototype launches for the company. 

The billionaire's plan was revealed during a recent hearing before the Railroad Commission of Texas, the state's energy regulator, Bloomberg reported.

Read more: Tesla has accused an engineer of downloading about 26,000 sensitive files in his first week

Production plans are on hold due to a legal dispute between the SpaceX subsidiary Lone Star Mineral Development and Dallas Petroleum Group, which claims ownership of some inactive wells sitting on the same land.

Dallas Petroleum Group claims it has ownership of both the wells, as well as surrounding acres, according to Bloomberg. 

Although it's unclear what exactly the gas would be used for, Tim George, an attorney representing Lone Star, said at the hearing that SpaceX plans to use the methane it extracts from the ground "in connection with their rocket facility operations," Bloomberg reported. 

Insider previously reported that SpaceX CEO Elon Musk had moved from California to Texas, a common path for tech CEOs looking to save on state income taxes. He has also said he would relocate Tesla to Nevada and the Lone Star State. 

In December, Musk, said the reason behind his move to Texas was so that he could focus on SpaceX's Starship vehicle and Tesla's new Gigafactory.

Musk tweeted on Thursday that he will give $100 million to whoever creates the best carbon-capture technology. Carbon capture could play a major role in President Joe Biden's plans to address climate change, and Musk's comments have suggested that he wants to produce synthetic carbon-neutral rocket fuel to power SpaceX rockets.

 

Read more: Elon Musk says he will give $100 million to whoever creates the best carbon-capture technology

The surrounding SpaceX land has had little oil and gas development, and nearby there are almost a dozen wells classified as either abandoned or dry holes, Railroad Commission Records show. 

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Larry King was known for interviewing celebrities and politicians, but he also had some unforgettable interviews with business leaders. Here’s a roundup.

Larry King
Larry King is known for interviewing everyone from presidents to business leaders.
  • Television legend Larry King died on Saturday, and he left behind a 60-year career with 40,000 interviews.
  • King is known for his interviews with major celebrities and politicians, but he also interviewed top business leaders and CEOs. 
  • We broke down five of his most significant interviews with top business leaders. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Emmy-winning broadcaster Larry King may be known for his interviews with major celebrities and politicians, but the television legend also interviewed top business leaders and CEOs. 

King, who died on Saturday morning in Los Angeles, was best known for hosting the talk show "Larry King Live." It was reported that King had been in the hospital battling COVID-19 since the start of January. He passed away at the age of 87, his company Ora Media said in a statement.

The talk show was CNN's most-watched and longest-running show. It ran nightly for over two decades.

Throughout his 63-year career, King conducted 40,000 interviews and spoke with everyone from Frank Sinatra to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

King was famous for interviews with politicians and other notable figures. But he also interviewed various notable business leaders, like the cofounder of Microsoft, Bill Gates.

We took a look at some of his most significant interviews with top business leaders. 

The five interviews are listed below by date: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bill Gates: 2000
Bill Gates

Bill Gates, co-founder of Microsoft Corporation, has an estimated net worth of $129 billion.

He is the world's third-richest person, and he spends his billions on charity through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Gates spoke with King on January 1, 2000 about the future of computers. He made a second appearance on the show in 2010, alongside his father. 

In his first interview, King asked Gates if there had been a turning point for Microsoft. 

Gates responded: "Well, it's hard to say. The most important thing we did is figure out how we could take all these computers from different companies, what are now called personal computers, and make them compatible, so you could buy from Dell, Compaq, Hewlett-Packard, any of the manufacturer, and run all the same software. And that was a huge risk, because before that, all the computer had made incompatible machines."

 

Martha Stewart: 2004
Martha Stewart

Known for her DIY crafts and home decor tips, Martha Stewart is a businesswoman, writer, and television personality.

She founded the media and merchandising company, Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia.

Stewart was sentenced to five months in jail in 2004, after being charged and convicted of a number of financial crimes.

Days after her sentencing, she appeared on the show, and spoke about the verdict. 

King asked Stewart if she was surprised by the sentence.

Stewart responded: "You're always surprised at something like that, I would think. And you can't say that you're happy. You can't say, I mean, I'm happy that it's five months in, and five months house arrest. Rather than 16 months in prison. Which -- that was the sentencing guidelines. And the judge stayed within the minimum. I'm grateful for that."

 

Ken Lay: 2004
Kenneth Lay
Kenneth Lay speaks during an interview in his office at the company's headquarters February 5, 1996 in Houston, Texas.

Ken Lay was the founder and CEO of the energy company Enron Corporation.

He was found guilty on 10 counts of securities fraud and related charges in 2001. He passed away in 2006 while on vacation before serving time.

Enron's collapse was among the biggest corporate scandals in United States history.

In 2004, King went to Houston and interviewed Lay days after he pled not guilty. 

"So you still had some faith in the company?" King asked Lay

Lay responded: "I had a lot of faith in the company. Larry, when we went bankrupt, I still had about over a million shares of Enron stock I owned outright, and had about six million options, which up until late 2001 were very valuable."

 

Jeffrey Skilling: 2004
Jeffrey Skilling
Former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling walks to the federal courthouse for his sentencing hearing October 23, 2006 in Houston, Texas.

Jeffrey Skilling was the former CEO of the energy company Enron Corporation.

He pled not guilty to 36 charges, including multiple counts of insider trading, securities fraud and making false statements stemming from the company's stunning collapse. 

In 2006, Skillings was sentenced to 24 years in prison. 

The scandal led to several reforms, including making CEO's personally verify corporate earnings reports.

When asked what he wants to do with his life, Skillings responded:

"I don't know, Larry. You know, at this point, I think my purpose, right now, in life -- what gets me up in the morning, which, some mornings, it's pretty tough to get up, but my purpose in life right now, getting up in the morning, is I want to be someone that goes out and helps explain what happened.

There are a lot of employees out there that, I imagine, have children that go to them and say, Mom or dad, did you work for a criminal organization -- a bad company? We weren't' a bad company. We were -- we were -- we thought we were building a great company. We thought we were building a company that was helping to open and create new competitive markets, give customers choice where choice never existed before. We felt good, all of us, and I think if I can do anything to get the message out so that -- so that our employees can look at their children and they can say we were part of a good organization. Something happened. It was -- you know, and we will find out what happened, but it was not because of the motives of the people that were involved, either their motives or certainly my motives. We were trying to build a great company."

Carlos Slim: 2010
Carlos Slim
Carlos Slim Helu speaks during a press conference of VII Symposium of Historic Centers at Palacio de Mineria on May 23, 2019 in Mexico City, Mexico.

Carlos Slim, is an influential Mexican businessman, investor, philanthropist, and is among the world's wealthiest individuals.

Mexico's richest man, he has an estimated net worth of $59 billion. 

He was number one on the "Forbes" 2010 list of the wealthiest people.

Slim is the chairman and CEO of telecom giant Telmex and his family controls America Movil, Latin America's biggest mobile telecom firm.

When asked by King how stays on top of his business, Slim answered

"Well, how can you be on top of the things you do? I think when you are involved in a business, first of all you need to know the business. After that you know the business, you can -- the numbers tell you what is happening. You can read with the numbers.

If things are going well, if are not going well. You make cooperation with your competitors. You look at the international references to try to achieve the best reference nationally. And you are following the business not necessarily going to the -- go to America to see what is happening and what our thinking. The numbers talk to you."

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Meet the new influencer company working with top creators and models on OnlyFans

unruly agency influencer onlyfans accounts 4x3

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the influencer and creator economy. Sign up for the newsletter here.

Before we get started, I want to first introduce a new reporter on the business of influencers team, Mark Stenberg!

You can reach Mark at [email protected] and on Twitter @MarkStenberg3. He will be covering all things related to the creator economy and new media models.

Now onto the news. 

A new influencer agency has climbed to prominence in the industry by helping creators and models manage their OnlyFans accounts.

Unruly Agency works with top influencers like Tana Mongeau and Daisy Keech, offering a full-service approach to OnlyFans.

I spoke with the founders of Unruly and industry insiders to learn how the agency works and the services it provides.

Here are a few key takeaways:

  • Unruly helps clients set up content shoots and an OnlyFans posting schedule.

  • Unruly also works with some influencers on incorporating integrative marketing on OnlyFans through product placement.

  • The company has connected clients with brands like Fashion Nova, Pretty Little Thing, and Manscaped for brand partnerships.

  • Some other talent managers don't want to work with OnlyFans, so their clients are jumping directly to Unruly.

"We look at ourselves as a concierge service for influencers," Unruly said in a statement. "We take the talent's ideas and help them roll them into production to bring them to life."

Read the full story on Unruly Agency here.

An LA landlord is suing a TikTok influencer group after months of conflict

Drip Crib LA - TikTok house
(L-R) Drip Crib residents Dedrick Spence, Abel Carden, Chris Weaver, Desmond Spence and Emiliano Decontreras Jr. make a TikTok video on May 08, 2020.

During the rise of TikTok, a wave of social-media stars moved into Los Angeles mansions to live together and make content.

But it hasn't been all smooth sailing.

My colleague Dan Whateley wrote that an LA landlord is suing the TikTok collective "Drip Crib," launched by Devion Young. 

  • Young spent tens of thousands of dollars to form the house, renting a mansion for himself and creators and moving into it in March. But he soon fell behind on rent.

  • The property's owner alleged in the lawsuit that the group unlawfully conducted business at the house.

  • In the suit, the landlord also alleged the group had violated LA's health and safety code during the coronavirus pandemic.

Read more on the lawsuit here.

Leaked slides from a recent Instagram presentation reveal the advice it's giving to creators on what to post

Instagram reels

Instagram has been meeting with creators in the last several months and sharing advice about what to post.

My colleague Sydney Bradley wrote about a recent Instagram presentation, whose slides were leaked to Insider.

It included advice like this: 

  • Stories: "Behind the scenes of your daily life" or "In-the-moment updates"

  • Reels: "Entertaining, short videos" or "Your take on trending content"

  • Live: "Direct conversations with your audience" or "Invite friends"

For Feed posts, Instagram recommends to "Use carousels for more engagement in one post" [Carousel posts can feature up to 10 slides] and to "Stay active in the comments to stay engaged with your community."

Read more on the leaked slides here.

How the 9-publication cooperative Brick House designed a revenue splitting system

Maria Bustillos
Brick House Cooperative founding member Maria Bustillos says the goal of the project longevity, not profit.

The Brick House Cooperative is a group of nine independent publications that operate under one umbrella.

The media collective is worker-owned, subscription-based, and free of formal investment.

Mark wrote that the group created a 25-page legal document that lays out how the publications divide revenue and split ownership.

"The entire structure is dedicated to: If it grows, the people who are in it are the ones who are going to benefit," said the group's founder, Maria Bustillos.

Read more about Brick House's revenue splitting system here.

More creator industry coverage from Business Insider:

SeatGeek
SeatGeek's "behind the scenes," video with David Dobrik at his NYC pop-up shop.

Seeking nominations for the top executives in influencer marketing

TikTok logo
FILE PHOTO: The TikTok logo is pictured outside the company's U.S. head office in Culver City, California, U.S., Sept. 15, 2020.

Industry updates: 

This week from Insider's digital culture team:

olivia josh hsmtmts
Olivia Rodrigo and Joshua Bassett of High School Musical: The Musical: The Series perform onstage during the 5th Annual Elsie Fest: Broadway's Outdoor Music Festival on October 5, 2019 in New York City.

'Drivers License' by Olivia Rodrigo is TikTok's latest obsession. A speculated love triangle is fueling its popularity.

Actress Olivia Rodrigo's debut single "Drivers License" has exploded on TikTok.

Insider reporters Rachel E. Greenspan, Palmer Haasch, and Kat Tenbarge wrote that the song's appeal is partly thanks to its Taylor Swift-esque storytelling.

TikTok users have latched onto the song, making videos speculating about its meaning, praising its lyricism, and creating memes.

Read more about the viral hit here.

More from Insider: 

Cameo

Here's what else we're reading: 

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