3 nightmares to keep Salesforce’s Marc Benioff up at night

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I'm Insider Tech Features Editor Alexei Oreskovic, and I'm always eager to hear your thoughts, feedback and tips, so hit me up at [email protected]

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This week: The Salesforce Nightmares

Salesforce founder Marc Benioff, wearing a sports coat jacket and in front of a blue background on a stage, extends his hands forward during a talk.
Marc Benioff

Salesforce made the tech world do a double-take this week when it announced plans to launch Salesforce+, a video streaming service with original content. The videos on Salesforce+ will likely be aimed at an office-worker audience, and designed to promote the company's tools rather than to win Emmys.

But since we're on the subject of plots, let's consider some "nightmare" scenarios relating to Salesforce's business. As Salesforce pushes forward on a mission to ring up $50 billion in revenue by 2025, and as it expands into new markets with its acquisition of Slack, the company will need to execute flawlessly on its gameplan - and be prepared for unexpected challenges. Here's how things could go wrong.

Read the full story here:

Experts say these are the 3 nightmare scenarios for Salesforce


GoPuff scores an own goal

Don't be surprised if GoPuff, the convenience store delivery startup, becomes the next hot spot in the gig economy worker fight.

On July 30, GoPuff raised a hefty $1 billion of fresh funding. One week later it cut hourly pay for workers at its Philadelphia home base, in at least one case, by 30%. As you might expect that didn't go over well. Employees have started meeting with worker advocacy groups and there's talk of a work stoppage.


Venture Capitalists vs Hedge Funds

Rahul Vohra CEO of Superhuman
Rahul Vohra is the CEO and cofounder of the email provider Superhuman.

Venture capital firms and hedge funds have very different approaches to startup investing. There's no better illustration than Superhuman's recent $75 million funding round, in which the email startup raised cash from IVP, an elite Silicon Valley VC firm, and Tiger Global, the New York hedge fund that's plowing money into tech.

How different were the two investors? One of the investors committed to the deal in two months, the other did it in two days.


Bezos, Branson, and Musk - the space follies

star wars celebration cantina

Disney is getting closer to opening the doors to its very-cool looking Star Wars-themed hotel in Florida. But the company wants to avoid any misunderstandings - while the hotel is called the Galactic Starcruiser, Disney stresses that it's not an actual spaceship and guests will not be leaving the planet Earth.

Meanwhile, Elon Musk's SpaceX launch site in Texas, which really does send rockets into the skies, has a unique job opening: spaceport mixologist.

And finally, something strange is afoot on the planet Mars. The NASA Perseverance rover drilled into the red planet's surface for the first time this month, carrying out a mission to collect rock samples for future analysis. But for reasons unclear, the sample of Martian soil has vanished.

There's probably a perfectly reasonable explanation, even if it sounds like the premise for a sci-fi thriller.


Recommended readings:

Cisco employees are bracing for layoffs, which have become a dreaded summer tradition at the company

53 startups hit $1 billion valuations in July as 'hot unicorn summer' rages. Here are all of them.

Sellers on Amazon and Etsy can have their businesses shut down instantly by ruthless rivals and scammers using a clever loophole

Fair Financial investors say SoftBank drove the startup into the ground so it could gain full control through bankruptcy

How an anonymous crypto founder convinced heavyweights like Andreessen Horowitz and Sequoia to invest over $40 million into his startup

Cybersecurity pros are burning out faster than ever as threats rise. Here's how experts say firms should cope.

Leaked documents reveal Amazon's new 'Rules of Engagement' to address rising tension with AWS cloud partners


Not necessarily in tech:

The Insurrectionists in the Boardroom - Dozens of people who publicly supported radical right-wing efforts to overturn the 2020 election hold roles as federal appointees at places like the Kennedy Center and the Holocaust Memorial Council


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- Alexei

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